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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1897)"

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«* r -!»L LU283 



NEIL'S- PESTER 




FoJ.ZiK. 



Silff FRANCISCO, JANUARY 2, 1897. 



Number 1. 



Printed and Published erery Saturday by the proprietor, FBED MARRIOTT 
64 Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office a* Second-date Matter. 

The office of the A'EWS LETTER in Mm York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building, {Frank E. Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), ichere information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rales. 

THE New Year is greeted hopefully by many a man 
who believes it cannot bring him worse luck than he 
had in 1896. 

THE excommunication of Tolstoi by the Holy Synod of 
the Greek church may be expected to have about as 
much effect as the famous ban laid upon the jackdaw of 
Rheims. 



GOVERNOR BUDD favors some radical changes in the 
laws relative to the commitment of insane persons, 
and to the management of the State asylums. It is high 
time for some remedial legislation in this respect. 

THE late train-wrecking in Alabama, with its awful 
loss of life, indicates not only the necessity of making 
this atrocious crime punishable with death, but also the 
need of a rigorous enforcement of the penalty. A due re- 
gard for the safety of the public makes this imperative. 

KEAL estate men say, with good reason, that there 
was never a better time than this for investment in 
San Francisco. Property has suffered a downward 
tendency for three years past, but the indications are now 
decidedly favorable for a general improvement in this 
regard. 

ACCORDING to reports received by the State Board of 
Trade, more people are coming into California this 
winter than for many years past. This is gratifying in- 
telligence. With this immigration of homeseekers, and 
improved prices for wheat, land values should rise and 
there should be a general return of pi-osperity. 



THE learned gentlemen who attempt to substitute 
reason and analysis for authority and faith, as found- 
ations for the Christian religion, merely create alarm and 
uncertainty where before there was serene, if unthinking, 
confidence and belief. It is but a step from the so-called 
"rational" Christianity to complete agnosticism. 

A TREATY of arbitration between England and 
America, if agreed upon as reported, will rank as 
one of the most notable achievements of the present Ad- 
ministration. It may not be an absolute safeguard 
against war, .but it gives to both countries assurances of a 
long continuance of their present peaceful relations. 

THERE is bitter complaint in Germany that the 
aristocracy have a monopoly of official positions in 
the civil service, as well as in the army and navy. The 
mutterings of discontent among the masses, and the rapid 
growth of socialism and democracy, indicate that the im- 
perial Government is more in danger from the German 
people than from its foreign enemies. 

THE experiment of rural mail delivery is shortly to be 
tried in a district of Santa Clara county, by order of 
the postal authorities. Should the results be satisfactory, 
farmers and fruit growers in all well populated localities 
will, we hope, be afforded the same facilities. They are 
entitled to all the conveniences the Government may be 
enabled to furnish. 



IT is not always wise to give advice about making money, 
but to those who are seeking a profitable rural indus- 
try it seems perfectly safe to recommend the cultivation 
of the orange in suitable localities of Northern California. 
The fruit matures so early, in the foothills of this division 
of the State, that it comes into market in November, thus 
securing to the grower much better prices than can be 
had for the bulk of the Southern California crop. 



NEWS comes from Berlin that three hundred German 
factories have resumed work, in consequence of the 
election of McKinley. This is rather curious. His 
victory, the Protectionists assured us, would reopen the 
mills and factories in this country — not in Europe. The 
explanation may be that the German manufacturers ex- 
pect to sell goods in America, despite the tariff, and to 
get their pay in sound money. 



THE low price of silver has led to increase of gold min- 
ing in Nevada, where many promising auriferous 
properties are being developed. It is of course well 
known that a large percentage of the Comstock bullion 
has been gold, but Nevada has been generally regarded as 
identified with the one great mining interest of silver. In 
the future, however, it may be that her output of gold 
will exceed that of the white metal. 



THE darkest blot in the history of California politics is 
undoubtedly the treachery of U. S. Senator George 
C. Perkins towards the Hon. James C. Waymire, in not 
exerting his influence to secure for him, as California's 
representative, a position to MoKinley's cabinet. Judge 
Waymire has hosts of friends in this State who had hoped 
to see him thus honored in return for his invaluable ser- 
vices to his party. A better man could not be found, and 
that he has been turned down by the delegation at Wash- 
ington goes far to prove that Senator Perkins is unaware 
of the desires of the party he is supposed to represent, 
and with which he is expected to be in accord. 

IP such sensational journals as the Examiner could be 
believed, a large part of the business of the American 
courts consists in invalidating laws on the pretense that 
they are unconstitutional, the true reason being that the 
acts in question do not suit the judges. There is very 
little foundation for such sweeping strictures. It would 
be wholly useless to have written constitutions, unless 
their terms are to be enforced, and necessarily this 
power can be exercised only through the courts. If 
judges are not to follow their honest opinions, and are to 
be governed by popular sentiment of the clamor of news- 
papers, our constitutions would better be abolished alto- 
gether. 

THE grave charges preferred by Mr. Frank Schmidt 
against those in authority at the City and County 
Hospital, and accusing certain doctors there (whose 
names are unfortunately unknown) of improperly treating 
and insulting his wife while undergoing an operation, must 
not be allowed to pass unnoticed. Not only the press of 
this city, but also all reputable practitioners, should de- 
mand that the matter be looked into immediately and that 
the guilty parties, if convicted upon investigation, receive 
commensurate punishment. The City and County Hospital 
has long been little less than a disgrace to the city, and if 
it be trugjkaji defenceless women are insulted there, then 
the^nol^man^gement must be changed. As taxpayers, 
w / Oa>N3 a right to defiaand it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 



THE OPENING YEAR. 

THE old year is out, and the new year is in. The king 
is dead; long live the king! It may well be believed 
that most of our people took leave of the " dear departed " 
without one sigh of regret. 1896 brought many trying 
per] .exilics. much that was evil, and little that was good 
to cither our Government or people. It was ushered in 
during an era of hard times, such as the United States 
not known during the present generation, and, dining 
four-fifths of its existence, it witnessed those times grow 
from bad to worse. There can be no doubt at all about 
that. The publicists of the period, perhaps wisely, en- 
deavored to blink at the facts, and industriously whistled in 
order to keep their own and the people's courage up, but 
the bitter experiences of the time are too deeply seared 
into the hearts of the masses to leave the least lingering 
doubt behind as to the gravity of the pressure that has 
ndured. We are but repeating history, not making 
it. It is not the purpose here to discuss why, in this land 
of plenty, these things should have been so. Nor is it 
necessary now to consider whether legislation has been at 
fault, or the extravagant habits of our people to blame, 
are matters worthy of the most serious consider- 
ation that can be given them — at the right time. To-day 
it is more to our purpose to decently bury the dead past, 
and see what of promise, of hopefulness, and of good cheer 
.v year opens with. With the departure of the old 
year most men have balanced their accounts as best they 
could, and it is meet and right that they should take stock 
of the future. The holidays, having been fairly well en- 
joyed, are over, and the cry of the hour is — "now to 
business. " 

Happily, it is no longer a temptation to evade and avoid 
looking at the prospects around us. On every hand, and 
along the whole line of our industrial activities, there are 
evidences of improving times that will bear the test of 
examination. This is true of the country as a whole, but 
specially true of California. All our products are to-day 
bringing much higher prices than a year ago. Some of 
them, and those the principal ones, are realizing from 50 
to 7."> per cent, more than they did a few months since. 
Wheal and fruit, the two great staple products of our 
State, have advanced so materially as to make all the dif- 
ference between financial distress and financial prosperity. 
With something like 30,000,000 bushels of wheat to sell, it 
ought to be cheering to our farmers to know that it is 
now worth 97 cents a bushel, instead of the 55 cents which 
ruled during the greater part of 189ti. The total enhance- 
ment in value of that one staple alone is about $12,600,000, 
which is certainly a very nice sum to have widely distrib- 
uted around among our people. It should cause the 
grumbling of the farmers to cease, enable them to make 
prompt payments to their creditors, and so make money 
"iiably plentiful in all our borders. What is true of 
the improved condition of the farmers is almost equally 
true of the better status of the orchardists. Dried fruits 
are. on an average, fifty per cent, higher than last year. 
With the best quality of dried apricots selling at 13 cents 
per pound, by the carload, instead of 7 cents, a year 
since, and with oranges finding a ready export sale at 
from t2 00 to 12.50 per box, there can be no doubt about 
the enhanced value of the vast fruit crop of California. 
With wheat and fruit selling readily at remunerative 
rates, and for spot cash, there must, necessarily, soon be 
plenty of money in circulation, and with that, of course, 
there will come that relief from financial pressure and 
hard times which we are all so ardently hoping for. We 
tion wheat and fruit because they form the bulk of our 
exports, but the improvement is by no means confined to 
those two important staples. Our wines, hops, wools, and 
almost everything we produce, are yielding much better 
returns than we have been accustomed to for some time, 
1 the profits of every kind of industry are on the 
up grade, and, than that, no better indications are possi- 
1 return to normal times. 
With the country around us prosperous, the city cannot 
fail to do well. San Francisco, like almost all large cities, 
depends very much upon its back country. The more pro- 
ducts that pass through our hands, the more profit will 
stick to them. The better the prices the larger the mar- 
gin of gain to the great army of middlemen in our city. 



Our business men are, perhaps, not as mindful of their de- 
pendence upon the producers in the interior counties as 
they ought to be. Our banks certainly have not been 
since the better days of the broadminded Ralston. It was 
his custom to notify business men who had dealings with 
his bank that "money must be on hand with which to move 
the crops." Farmers in those days had no trouble in 
obtaining advances through their city brokers. In more 
recent times, both our commercial and savings banks have 
looked askance at country securities of every kind. Full- 
bearing orchards, productive lands, substantial home- 
steads, and growing crops, ought to be specially attract- 
ive to investors who can appreciate the difference between 
an unimproved city lot and a reproductive farm or orchard. 
The indications to-day are that ranches are going up to 
normal figures quicker than city property. The reason 
for this is the most natural in the world. The ranchers 
have, despite the inadequacy of prices, weathered the 
financial storms of the past three years with a freedom 
from worries, harassments, and distress, to which all too 
many dwellers in our city have been strangers. If the 
tillers of the soil have, during that period, made no money, 
they have at least found no difficulty in living on the fat of 
their land. Hereafter, country homes are going to be 
more soughjt after in all parts of California, and that is 
well, because in that direction sure and certain prosperity 
lies. Our State needs nothing so much as population of 
the right kind. It wants more people who will go into the 
country and produce something. Of the classes that 
neither toil nor spin, but who live on others who do both, 
we have more than enough already. If we would do the 
one thing which above all others is most calculated to ex- 
pand our city and increase values, we would devote our- 
selves to the great purpose of filling up and building up 
the country. That truth is to-day more realized than it 
was, and in that fact there is much hope for the near 
future. 

It is a promising sign that the opening of the new year 
finds San Francisco full of civic pride and enthusiastically 
bent upon lighting her darkness, mending her ways, and 
improving her prospects generally. There is an ap- 
parent awakening that has not come one moment too soon. 
If this new-born spirit of progress shall prove enduring, 
good citizens may well thank God and take courage. Here- 
tofore, the management of municipal affairs has not been 
a matter that we could point to with anything like pride. 
The worst, rather than the best, elements of our stangely 
mixed population have up to now run things, and run them 
badly. At last the outlook is more promising. We have 
got an undoubtedly good Mayor, and it is believed that we 
have a fairly good Board of Supervisors. The daily press 
no longer stands in the way of public improvements. 
Taxes will be much less than last year, whilst there will 
probably be more to show for them. We think San Fran- 
cisco is on the eve of a new departure along the lines of 
progress and prosperity. The new year opens auspiciously, 
and, we think, can be depended upon to bring us better 
times. 

The Cuban Notwithstanding the rash talk in Congress. 

Question. and the frantic appeals of the press that 
Spanish rule be at once obliterated 
from the soil of Cuba, there is a possibility that Spain has 
some good reasons to justify her in making strenuous 
efforts to retain possession of the island. Calmly con- 
sidered, some of the reasons should appeal powerfully to 
the judgment of business men, if they do not to politicians. 
Suppose, for instance, that a land-owner has rented a 
farm to one party and mortgaged it for a large sum to 
another. W T ould the tenant be justified in seizing the land 
for his own use and so desolating it as to make it worth- 
less as a security? Should the landlord be denied the 
right to protect himself and his property to the limit of 
his right under the law/ Spain has mortgaged Cuba to 
theextentof 1200,000,000 at least. No one disputes her 
right to have done so, and none should dispute her right to 
protect herself and her creditors. If the island is lost or 
destroyed, the debt will not be cancelled. It is not enough 
to say that Spain is not a beneficent mother to her 
colonies. Many a farmer ruins his laud through ignorance 
or greed, but he does not forfeit it on that account. War 
is a legal method for proceeding against rebellion. The 



January a 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



• not in a position to controvert 
that statement. Spain's manner of prosecuting war would 
not worry us so much if there were not two Cuban Juntas 
in this country— one in New York ami one in the Senate 
at Washington, both keeping an alreadv too sensational a 

- hot. It seems puerile for our public men to fume 

- old over every dispatch from Cuba, [f there is any 

one thing certain about the Cuban war. it is that no news, 
from whichever side it emanates, is reliable. President 
and must have had the best information to be bad 
so far, and he remains calm enough to attend quietly to 
his cluck shooting. But they say Cuba is a necessity to 
the Doited States as the key to the Gulf. Nonsense. 
There are duplicate keys to the Gulf. Cuba is no more a 
key to the Gulf than Florida — not so good a key, for 
Florida is backed by a base for land operations. Cuba is 
no more a key than is Yucataa. Must we have that too? 
England holds another key in the Bahamas. Must we 
dispossess her'.' We have flourished without Cuba for lL'O 
years, and it really looks as though we might survive 
another century without the island if we can suppress the 
visionary sentimentalists who see more glory in conouest 
and dominion than in improving the Government we have; 
more excitement in foreign wars and entanglements, than 
in the development of our own peaceful domain. It is 
possible, too, that real public sentiment in this question is 
misjudged, and that if the sense of the people were taken 
it would be discovered that the great majority are not in 
favor of war, carnage and conquest. We have just re- 
corded such an experience in connection with the silver 
issue. The people were against it notwithstanding that 
we had been pledged to free coinage by the press, the 
politicians and the legislature. 

The Prospects The opponents of the Pacific Bailroads' 
of the refunding bill have an immense advan- 

Refunding Bill, tage at this short session. Only seven 
weeks remain in which to pass it. It is 
quite within the power of its enemies to talk it to death. 
If it could reach a final vote it would undoubtedly pass 
both houses by substantial majorities. But obstructing 
the will of the majority has come to be one of the privi- 
leges of Congress. It is a curious commentary upon the 
pass to which parliamentary obstruction has brought us. 
As it seems to be settled that there will be an extra 
session, it may be that the refunding bill will go over as 
unfinished business, and be passed before foreclosure pro- 
ceedings can have made much headway. If we cared less 
for California and more for the humiliation of a demagogic 
press, we should like to see the refunding bill beaten and 
watch the consequences. In the first place, foreclosure is 
not as easy of accomplishment as some people suppose, 
and, if it were, what would be foreclosed? Simply a sec- 
ond mortgage on a road-bed from Ogden, by way of Niles, 
to San Jose. Such a road would not be worth operating. 
Then the first mortgage bonds would still remain and the 
Government would have to assume responsibility for them, 
or witness its own claim entirely extinguished. The 
Springfield Republican well says that "in case of a sale to 
private bidders there would be little chance for the Gov- 
ernment to get back a dollar. These are steps which call 
for some hesitation in face of the possibility of extending 
and securing the debt." That fairly expresses the feeling 
of the Eastern press. It is only local jealousy and malice 
that desire to defeat the only practicable scheme for ad- 
justing the railroad difficulty. 

The Veterans' Governor Budd is, we believe, sincerely 
Home. desirous of reducing the cost whilst in- 

creasing the efficiency of the State's 
many charitable institutions. He devotes much of his 
time to visiting them, and it is not too much to say that 
his vigilance in this direction has resulted in good. As a 
rule he has looked into things for himself, and he has been 
at pains to avoid being deceived by officials. We know of 
but one exception to his general rule, but it is a very bad 
exception. The Veterans' Home at Yountville continues 
as it began. From its inception it has been an institution 
where jobbery, and even robbery, ran riot. Royce's em- 
bezzlements made that so painfully apparent that the 
marvel is that matters were not righted then and there. 
Yet we know how strong the disposition was to cover up 



.it period, and how difficult it proved lobe 
to lot a little light Into exceedingly dark ways. The bad in 
fluence then exercised, as might ha. ed, has 

■ lone the Home no good, A veteran writes the 
Litter that it is to-day "a sink of iniquity, and a dif 

to the State, that ought cither to be reformed or 
ished." He supplies many details that go far to jl 

this sweeping denunciation. If only a tithe.. 

true, Governor Budd cannot any loo soon see to it tl 

sweep is made at Yountville. There can lie no 
doubt but that the State's appropriation is in distim I 
lation of the Constitution, which forbids the spending ,,f 
public money upon any institution not under exclusive 
State control. Officials sworn to uphold the law ought to 
obey their oaths. At present the title to the Home prop- 
erty is iu an irresponsible body known as the "Veterans' 
Home Association." Both the property and the manage- 
ment must be brought under State control, or the State 
must cease to supply funds to maintain "a sink of iniquity." 
To-day there is no direct responsibility attaching to any- 
body. Quite a large sum of money belonging to the vet- 
erans is supposed to be in somebody's hands, but thereby 
hangs a tale. That money should be inquired about. Its 
whereabouts ought not to be in doubt. The same Directors 
ought not to be on both the purchasing and auditing com- 
mittees, and, when they are, there is at least cause for re- 
mark, and, perhaps, even for suspicion. That wretched 
canteen nets somebody several hundred dollars a month, 
and that whilst its surroundings, accompaniments, and in- 
fluences are demoralizing to the entire institution. At 
best a canteen is but a doubtful benefit, whilst at worst it 
may be a gambling den, a death trap, and we hesitate to 
say what else. The Medical Director is said to run the 
institution, and Directors Currier and Blinn are said to 
run him. The belief obtains among those who ought to 
know that these three men could be replaced with advan- 
tage to the Home. During the coming session of the Leg- 
islature the News Letter will refer to this subject again. 

The Board A bill for the creation of a State Board of 
Of Tonsorialists, or a State Tonsorial Board, 

Tonsorialists. whichever it may be called, is to be 
presented to the Legislature. A like 
measure is to be introduced in Illinois and probably also 
in other States, for the consideration of the law-makers. 
Its purpose is to require all aspirants to membership in 
the ancient and honorable profession of the barber to pass 
an examination before a State Board. This examination 
will not be confined to mere mechanical skill 
with t razor and the shears, but will include know- 
ledge of contagious diseases of the skin and the blood. 
The bill requires a professional training of three years, 
with a "registered tonsorialist," as a preliminary to ex- 
amination, and no one without a certificate of competency 
and good moral character, from the Board, shall be 
allowed to practice the tonsorial art in this State. Penal- 
ties are provided for the use of soiled towels, dull razors, 
rusty shears, and so forth. The measure, as framed in 
California, contains no provision as to conversational 
qualifications, but this defect may be supplied by amend- 
ment. In addition to a knowledge of dermatology, a fair 
degree of proficiency in modern languages should be re- 
quired, in order that the tonsorialist may converse 
fluently with all his clients, ours being a cosmopolitan 
population. In fact, the measure should be greatly 
amplified, so as to have a more truly paternal character. 
And the Legislature should not confine its attention to 
the tonsorial art. There should be a State Board of Plumb- 
ing, to hold examinations in sanitation, knowledge of germ 
diseases, microscopy, mathematics, etc., on the part of 
plumbers' apprentices; a Board of Dairymen, with examin- 
ations as to bovine diseases, comparative dietetic value of 
the various foods for cows, etc.; a Board of Butchers, a 
Board of Bakers, a Board of Grocers, and various other 
Boards, so that the watchful care of the State over its 
citizens may be extended through all professions, trades 
and callings. The members of these Boards would all ' 
draw comfortable salaries from the State, and thus a 
large number of worthy persons, more or less politically 
useful to the appointing power, would be provided for. 
By all means, let us have more Boards — the more the 
merrier. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 



Truth About The Bryanite orators during the late cam- 
Our Farmers, paign worked the country into almost 
sadness over the condition of the Western 
farmers. On the highest official authority, we now Know 
that there was more fiction than fact in the oratory of 
that time. The report of the Secretary of Agriculture, 
just issued, tells us that seventy-two percent of the farms 
in the United States, occupied by their owners, are abso- 
lutely free from mortgages or other incumbrances, and 
that three-fourths of the borrowings have gone either for 
the purchase of farms or their improvement. The West 
and South, he shows, are comparatively free from mort- 
gages, and that it is the older and poorer farms along the 
north Atlantic that are in debt. This is particularly true 
of iNew Jersey, which, in proportion to its farm values, car- 
ries a greater burden of indebtedness than any other 
State in the union. The recent claims that the farmers 
are almost universally in debt, despondent and suffering, 
the Secretary declares to be without any foundation, a be- 
littlement of agriculture, and an indignity to every intelli- 
gent and practical farmer. The tillers of the soil, "be says, 
are not mendicants, nor wards of the Government, to be 
treated to annuities, but the representatives of the oldest, 
most honorable, and most essential occupation of the 
human race, upon which all other vocations depend for 
subsistence and prosperity. Farmers are proverbially 
grumblers, and as such, too frequently mislead people not 
over familiar with their ways. Most of them have a snug 
little sum put away to meet any emergency, and with 
those who have not there is no need to waste sympathy. 
The man who has a farm fairly well stocked is about as 
securely and certainly provided for as any man can be in 
this world. He can live on his own, even though he see 
not a dollar of money. City life has its charms for men 
who like excitement, more or less unhealthy, but for sober 
satisfaction and true comfort the life of the husbandman is 
much to be preferred. Nowhere else in this wide world 
are his lines cast in more pleasant places than in this fair 
California of ours. 

Who Shall Be The loyalty of Californians to deserving 

Our Senator? Californians is proverbial. This is proba- 
bly due to the fact that, as a rule, Cali- 
fornians are hard workers, and Btruggles that culminate 
in success are ever respected. Few of our leading men 
were nursed in the lap of luxury; nearly all of them have 
swung themselves into prominence by continued applica- 
tion. With our young men to-day this is as much a truth 
as it was of their sires in the days of '49. And the young 
men are the Jones, especially in politics, who are to the 
fore at present. In the Republican party there are many 
young men worthy and able of taking a position beside the 
Honorable Stephen M. White in the United States Senate. 
It only remains to be settled which one is most worthy of 
being sent there. 

We run through with pride the recognition extended in 
the past to such men as Sargent, Miller, Williams, Felton, 
all men of strong individuality. Then comes Perkins, who 
has been honored as Governor and Senator, but has al- 
ways filled his positions with indifference, and has never 
been bold enough a statesman to carry the confidence of 
his whole State. He has always had about him a little 
clique or private combination that he makes use of, and 
whom he has always repaid with some small place, or, 
more frequently, with a promise unfulfilled. In the last 
campaign he was unmindful of the pre-eminent and all- 
absorbing consideration that was McKinley and Hobart, 
and almost lost the State to the Party by getting up dissen- 
sions in trying to pledge the various County delegations 
to him for United States Seuator. In little or noth- 
ing did he advance the cause of the general ticket, either 
by personal effort or by contribution. In the last, as in 
other campaigns, he withheld himself, to use a common 
expression, to see which way the cat was going to jump. 
before he became active. Whenever he thought that the 
Republican party would be successful, then with a great 
hurrah and fuss and feathers he suddenly appeared upon 
the scene, and attempted to convey the impression that 
he had been doing everything necessary to carry the 
whole campaign. 

By singular contrast, we can name numbers of men who 
have been unsclfihhly devoted to the RupubHcau party, 



and who for years have served it in season and out of sea- 
son, and who served it best when success seemed most 
doubtful. They were stimulated by the very possibility to 
their best efforts on account of impending defeat, and all 
for the love of party without the hope of reward, save the 
pride of party success. We recall a few instances of men 
who were not only prominent in the last campaign, but 
also in the campaigns of the last fifteen years. George 
Knight, General Barnes, General Chipman, Samuel M. 
Shortridge, Judge Carpenter, Frank Coombs, Colonel 
John P. Jackson, Judge James A. Waymire, Henry C. 
Dibble, Colonel H. I. Kowalsky. Hon. Frank McGowan, 
and others too numerous to mention. All of these gentle- 
men have labored unselfishly for the success of their party. 
And when a party has so many prominent men, such as 
those whose names we have just mentioned, and whose 
loyalty to the cause has gained them the love of the entire 
party throughout the State, we naturally look to the 
selection of one of their number as the man whom the 
party can best afford to appoint to do it honor as against 
the selfish cormorant who seeks to honor himself. Some 
of the men we mentioned, we think, are justly ambitious 
and should be recognized, and if the members of the pres- 
ent Legislature should see fit to honor, for instance, the 
Honorable Samuel M. Shortridge with the position of 
United States Senator, this State of California would feel 
that one of its brainiest and manliest representatives had 
been justly chosen. Wo purposely select the name of Mr. 
Shortridge because we have beard him spoken of for this 
position, and because California would have in him a cham- 
pion and a defender after her own heart, and one equal 
to the best talent now occupying like positions from other 
States. But whoever the Legislature selects, whether 
one of the gentlemen just mentioned or some other worthy 
person not yet spoken of, we will feel that it has done 
much towards striking down a selfish and unworthy man. 
We feel forced to say in conclusion that no matter who 
votes for the Honorable George C. Perkins for United 
States Senator, that there is one man more than others 
who cannot vote for him and yet maintain his self-respect, 
letting alone holding the esteem of his friends and neigh- 
bors. That man is Judge James A. Waymire. 

The Writing It behooves the merchants of this city to 
On bestir themselves if they do not wish to 

The Wall. see what little trade is still theirs diverted 
by the more enterprising cities in this 
State. We refer more especially to the city of Los 
Angeles, which is rapidly becoming a rival to San Fran- 
cisco in more senses of the word than one. That the 
rivalry is friendly makes it none the less dangerous. A 
city rises in importance according to the amount of 
business done in its limits. Its progress is determined by 
the enterprise and success of its individual merchants. 
Commercial apathy means ultimate ruin. The News Letter, 
while having the interests of all California at heart, is 
mainlv interested in San Francisco and would gladly see 
it maiutain that supremacy which has hitherto been 
accorded it. We repeat, however, that our title to this 
supremacy is being undermined by the sister city above 
mentioned, and unless our business men bestir themselves 
the commercial laurels may not much longer be ours. While 
our merchants sit in their dusty offices and complain about 
hard times, those of Los Angeles are busy attending to 
business or engaged in drumming it up. While five houses 
in nearly every one of our blocks are empty and idle, new 
buildings, imposing and substantially constructed, are 
springing up everywhere in the sister city. The general 
feeling about the place is one of energy and bustle and 
those who complain are usually the idlers found in every 
community. A message is being writ upon our walls. 
Will our merchants decipher and understand it in time? 
Or are they willing that the days of this great city, so 
rich in glorious possibilities, should be numbered'/ 

There all the It was a well-earned honor which has just 
Honor Lies, been tendered the Hon. Alexander K. 
McClure, editor of the Philadelphia Times, 
in the form of a public dinner, upon his completion of half 
a century's continuous labor in the field of journalism — a 
testimonial gained by the most arduous work and most 
faithful publio service. Colonel McClure is secure in the 



Januaiy 2, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO Nl-.WS LETTER. 



5 



title of tli. 

no living editor exceeds his length of sprviie in this coun- 
try, except Mr. Danaol the New York Sun, ami he !•;. 
two or three years. Krw. living or dead, have completed 
fifty consecutive years in the same profession. 1 

ire was born in 1828, and is therefore not an old man 
yet. His life work was begun by the establishment of a 
country newspaper in Terry County. Pennsylvania, in 
1846. He has lived in a period of the greatest historical 
importance, and of stupendous achievement in all lines of 
progress, which gave wide scope to his great ability. The 
friend and co-worker of Lincoln, of Grant, of the great 
war Governor Curtin of his own State, and of all the noted 
men of his time, Colonel McClure and his paper lni\ 
cepted the full share in the struggles of the nation in war 
and politics. It was natural, therefore, that Governors, 
Senators, Congressmen, and public servants generally, 
should have met to honor him and testify their apprecia- 
tion of his character. Officers and individuals, policies 
and parties, have risen in their turn, left their imprint on 
the pages of history, more or less indelibly, and have 
passed away since he begau the career which has brought 
him fame and honor, but his paper still remains, a power 
in our national life, and an evidence of the pre-eminence of 
his calling over mere politics. One note in his eloquent 
speech of acknowledgment is the key to his success, and 
voices a sentiment worthy of the attention of every jour- 
nalist. He said : " I have long held that the responsible 
direction of a widely read and respected newspaper is the 
highest trust under our free Government. I do not thus 
speak of it to claim for it honors that may be questioned, 
but to present the oppressive responsibilities which rest 
upon those who are to-day educating a nation of seventy 
millions of people under a Government where every citi- 
zen is a sovereign, and where the people hold in their own 
hands the destiny of the greatest republic of the world." 
Great thoughts are in those few words. The general 
adoption of their timely suggestions by those who control 
the press would raise tbe moral tone of the nation by leaps 
and bounds. Long may the genial Colonel live to set an 
example of clean, sturdy, patriotic journalism before his 
brethren of the pen. 

A History-Making One who reads the news of the world 
Epoch. from day to day, with its gradual 

movement here and there, scarcely 
realizes the momentous changes which are taking place. 
But let him sum up the events of a few years and add 
those which are transpiring, and he must be impressed 
with the fact that we are living in a rapid, history-making 
period. Looking no farther back than the Chinese-Japan- 
ese war, let us see what events of importance the short 
space includes merely in the world's political history. To 
begin with, we note the development of two Oriental 
nations into important powers; the absorption of Formosa 
by Japan, and the independence of Corea. Russia's de- 
sire for a better foot-hold on the Pacific, and her jealousy 
of Japan is prophetic of still greater changes in that re- 
gion in the near future. It may culminate in a seizure of 
Chinese territory or a war with Japan, or both. The 
French are practically forced out of Egypt, and the Sou- 
dan is rapidly falling under English ruie. Southern and 
Central Africa are being explored and colonized, while the 
Madagascar of the Hovas is already a French possession. 
The concert of Europe has declared that Turkey must 
sink to the level of a ward of the Powers, with a con- 
tinual threat of dismemberment hanging over her. The 
troubles of Spain are no small item in the general shaking 
up. Cuba, so long her much-abused colony, may try her 
hand at self-government. The Pearl of the Antilles might 
have been a polished pearl to-day, instead of the rough 
gem she is, if her fate had been in the hands of a more 
progressive power than Spain. The Philippine Islands are 
another proof of the same truth. There are 1400 of the 
islands, large and small, with an area of 115,000 square 
miles. They have a splendid climate, and are capable of 
vast development. They have belonged to Spain for three 
centuries, and to-day Spain cannot report their flora and 
fauna, their geological formation, nor even their popula- 
tion. She may now lose them — it is to be hoped she will — 
and when she does there will be a lively scramble for them, 
with Russia and Japan foremost in the race. Spain her- 



thrcatoned with revolution at borne, and ma 
becon I Republic. The fateof Hawaiian 

d through American influence. Will it be a Rep 
one of the Dnt ted States, or a county o( California.' 
of these three conditio to be its destiny. Before 

1900, all the impending changes we have noted mu 

worked out, with others, perhaps, which have not yet 

given evidence of their coming. When they are complete, 

what a stirring history can lie written of the compara- 
tively peaceful decade With which the century clo 

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SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 



MEN WHO POSE AS MINING PROMOTERS. 

M INI NO is again a popular fad in San Francisco, and 
J 1 for the time being every one who can make a con- 
nection of some kind with a movement which suggests the 
possibility of cleaning up a rapid fortune on a magnificent 
scale does so. Report has it that money is being made in the 
business, and this is enough to change the occupations of a 
large portion of the community which never proposes to 
let a chance escape to make a dollar, provided the chance 
does not involve any pecuniary outlay upon its own part. 
All that has to be done now, according to the views of 
many, is to get control of a piece of mining ground for a 
nominal sum, aud in turn dispose of it to some stranger, 
who later on is inveigled into the bargain by the promoter 
whose services have been enlisted for the occasion. 

During the coming year it is fondly expected that an 
army of men in search of California mines will invade the 
State. This belief is established beyond doubt in the minds 
of many by the millions which have been changing hands 
daily of late in mining transactions. It doesn't matter 
that the bulk of the sales are merely on paper. They 
loom up large, and that is enough to excite the acquisitive 
soul hungering after a wealth which has been too long 
coming in the past. To meet the demand for mines, every 
hole in the ground from Siskiyou to San Diego has been in- 
spected, and old records have been burnished up in a man- 
ner which dims effectually that portion bearing upon fail- 
ure in the past. If good intentions count for anything, 
the entire ownership of the State in everything which per- 
tains to mineral deposits will change hands during the 
coming twelve months. 

In order to facilitate matters, new mining companies 
are now being incorporated at a rate which is astonishing. 
The incorporators represent all classes, and consist in the 
main of men who know as much about a mine as it is 
likely to do about them. The weaving spider, however, is 
behind each and all of these apparently innocent-looking 
little associations of honest citizens. The man of affairs 
controlling the destiny of schemes launches with an airy 
capital of Moating millions, which it is proposed to solidify 
into cold, hard coin of the republic under the fostering 
manipulation of the mastermind. 

A motley crowd, it would appear, were the various occu- 
pations of new mining corporations segregated. All 
trades are represented, and for that matter every walk in 
life, no matter how humble it may be. Shares take the 
form of a lottery ticket with the promise of fortune on an 
equally elaborate scale. A few of the companies repre- 
sented start out with a bona-fide intention of seeking this 
fortune by legitimate work, and with chances for success 
in their case, while the others base their hopes of profit 
solely upon a sale to some liberally disposed buyer. 

The so-called promoters of mining sales here and in all 
the leading markets of the old and new world are alive to 
the situation. Voluminous correspondence goes on be- 
tween them, the objective point in all cases being to pro- 
vide alluring bait for the trap set for the unwary investor. 
The latter does not know, of course, that when it comes 
down to million dollar propositions California, even with all 
her store of gold, cannot produce more than half-a-dozen 
mines of the class, and that when they are marketed the 
itinerant peddler will not be engaged in the sale. For 
this reason he proves an easy victim to the alluring tales 
of ready-made bonanzas which do not exist, and turns his 
fortune over as plunder to the promoter and his clique of 
assistants. 

This city is simply alive with these sharks. Montgomery 
street is lined with them from early morning until the shad- 
ows fall and the mining offices close as a matter of economy 
in gas bills. Their game is the man from London or the East, 
the sleek, well-fed looking heavy-weight, who poses as 
confidential man of world-renowned banking firms. A nod 
fium this great man to one of the hungry-eyed parasites 
waiting to gel an audience, is enough to bring down upon 
his bead an anathema maranatha strong in feeling as it 
may be in invective. 

These imported accessories before the fact in the 

slaughter of innocents abroad, like any other class of 

ial operator, can be summed up as good, bad, and 

indifferent, with the good, as usual, in a very hopeless 

minority. The men of the latter type are difficult to reach. 



They are out of range of the mob, and keep there as much 
as possible. When you meet them you find a gentleman, 
and one who is well versed in every detail of the business 
in which he is engaged. He does not find it necessary to 
air his strong connections abroad, but any statements he 
may make, or arrangements, can be depended upon. 

The pompous, arrogant, self-sufficient, and loud-talking 
representative of the class can be safely catalogued indif- 
ferent. He has just brains enough to make a thorough- 
going ass of himself, and not enough to make him danger- 
ous to any one but himself. He knows all about mining, 
and can afford, from his lofty perch of superiority, to 
sneer at anything which does not suit his views or meet 
with his approval. This type of promoter is over plentiful 
just now; mostly foreign; is short-lived, however, fortun- 
ately, and apt to get mad at a moment's notice, and kick 
himself out of the State by mistake, to the satisfaction of 
all who happened to come in contact with him. 

The " bad " promoter, as be is now in evidence, is a 
suave article. "With a record for villainy in the past, 
this species is looked to for the assistance which exper- 
ience promises in carrying out some nefarious operations. 
A sneak of the lower order, he can be depended upon just 
so long as it pays to be true to any side. Mean enough 
for a spy, tout, or any other qualification of low-class ras- 
cality, involving doctored reports, salted mines, with a 
bogus reputation as a mining expert, the smiling syco- 
phant rubs shoulders with honest men, a living example 
of unjailcd corruption, an offense to public decency and 
morality. Knowing absolutely nothing of the mining pro- 
fession by practical experience, and caring loss, the sole 
forte of this predatory scamp is a brazen effrontery which 
imposes upon his victims, who, carried away by plausible 
statements of profits in store, only awaken from a 'spell 
cast over them to find they have fallen a prey to the sli< I, 
confidence operator. Sometimes the " bad " operator 
gets involved in the toils of law, but Justice invariably 
finds him a raw customer to deal with, and he is set free 
to pursue his way to a fortune which, when attained, is 
salve enough for a conscience unaffected by the finger of 
public scorn. 

The less harmful type is the gentlemanly-garbed individ- 
ual of professedly scientific attainments, who comes here 
backed by a syndicate ready to invest millions upon his 
word. Some of this class have money supplied them from 
some quarter, which enables them to travel about in good 
style, and perfect their education, if inclined that way, by 
inspecting mines. This very nice position ends, of course, 
when the mistake is made of approving a property and 
suggesting its purchase. Rut, on the other hand, not a 
few of the class are impecunious, and the first chance foi 
employment affords an opportunity to demand money for 
expenses. A poor chance is, however, afforded in this 
State for a game of that kind just now, the honest mine- 
owner being more interested in raking in cash than in 
paying any out. 

Another batch of the syndicated advance agents is 
backed with money by what are known as development 
companies. The soft point with these gentlemen is a de- 
sire to get a showy mining property for a comparatively 
small sum of money, which will stand inflation for stock- 
jobbing purposes on the other side — of the Rockies or At- 
lantic, as the case may be. The elastic proportions of a 
property of this class is to be gauged entirely by the 
amount of ore which can be figured up in evidence as a 
standard for possible dividends in the future. In this way 
a mine bought at a premium of $500,000 is widened out to 
a couple of million when it reaches the dearly beloved who 
provide the necessary funds. The investors in a case of 
this kind take the chances, it might be added, and the pro- 
moters the coin. 

In view, therefore, of the vast number of irresponsibles 
attracted to the business temporarily, it will be wise for 
the owners of valuable mines to be careful with whom they 
deal if they intend to take advantage of the opportunities 
now offering in the market. In the bands of any of oar 
old-time mining men of good repute they are safe. But with 
strangers, the man who objects to having his credentials 
scrutinized, and who is unknown, by letter or otherwi 
local bankers or men of prominence, should be ignored, no 
matter how tempting the proposition he may advanc 

John Fin lay. 



January 2. 1S97. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY CITRUS FAIR. 



T1IK possibilities of California a gradually dis- 

■ week a grand Citrus lair \v.i-. held in 
10, in which all the counties, from San Joaquin to 
Kern, were represented in the exhibit of citrus fruits. 
The Fair was an out-and-out 81 

much attention on account of the tine exhibits made by 
some of the leading firms of this State. Every county in 
the San Joaquin Valley was handsomely represented in 
citrus and other semi-tropic fruits, and a majority of them 
in great abundance. 

The possibilities of this great valley are varied and im- 
mense. Fresno County made the first advance in raisin 
culture, and has kept well to the front. It has become 
universally recognized as the "'Raisin Center." This 
county has raised and shipped more raisins during the 
past ten years than all the balance of the State combined, 
and California is the only State in the Union where they 
are produced. 

Among the many exhibits of raisins, that of the Eagle 
Packing Company, winner of the first premium at the 
Columbian Exposition, under the management of Noble 
Brothers, was most prominent. This firm is responsible 
for much of Fresno's fame abroad, and one cannot wonder 
at it, when confronted with such an exhibit of raisins, 
packed in a variety ot excellent styles, and bearing an 
artistic " Bird of Freedom " as a trade-mark. 

Marshall & Wilson, of the Fresno Nursery, were also to 
the front, with their name and business exquisitely in- 
scribed in dried fruits, on a background of raisins, with a 
large fruit cross, in imitation of variegated marble, in the 
center of the design. It bespeaks the quality of their 
products, and will be sent to the Hamburg Exposition. 

A fine display was also made by Serapian Bros, of dried 
fruits, citrus fruits, and raisins. They are extensive 
growers, packers, and shippers of these products, and of 
figs. Their enterprise was illustrated, two years ago, in 
the starting of overland mule transportation to San Fran- 
cisco, in opposition to the railroad. 

Another handsome exhibit, and one which attracted 
much attention, was that of the St. George Vineyard. 
The St. George is one of the oldest, largest, and best ap- 
pointed wineries in the State, and the wine produced 
there is rapidly becoming a favorite, owing to the undevi- 
ating qualities of purity and general excellence. 

The Citrus Fair has done much to advertise California in 
a legitimate manner, and its promoters deserve a large 
amount of praise for the untiring energy they displayed, 
and which has made of the Fair an unqualified success. 

ONE of the public benefactors of Los Angeles has lately 
been visiting this city. This gentleman is Mr. G. J. 
Griffith, who gave that city what is probably the largest 
park in the world, as it comprises over 3000 acres. The 
park lies one mile north of the north line of Los Angeles, 
and is an absolutely ideal spot. The gift was a most gen- 
erous one, as the land is worth a fortune in itself. Mr. 
Griffith, however, is a gentleman whose enterprise has 
made him the possessor of millions, and this last gift will 
gain for him the love of an entire city. One stipulation 
made with the gift is that no car line running to the park 
shall be allowed to charge more than five cents for each 
trip. It will thus become the most popular of all the re- 
creation grounds of beautiful Los Angeles. It is to be 
hoped that Mr. Griffith will be permitted a long life to en- 
joy the popularity he has so justly earned. 

Eastward Through The Rockies. 

The traveler, tourist, or business man is wise when he selects the 
Rio Grande Western Railway "Great Salt Lake Route" for his route 
to the East. It is the only trans-continental line passing directly 
through Salt Lake City, and in addition to the glimpse it affords of 
the Temple City, the Great Salt Lake, and the picturesque Salt Lake 
and Utah Valleys, it offers the choice of three distinct routes through 
the mountains and the most magnificent scenery in the world. 
Double daily train service and through Pullman and Tourist sleep- 
ing cars between Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, and Chicago. 
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, of each week, Pullman Tourist 
cars are run from Los Angeles to Boston via Chicago, without 
change. 

For pamphlets descriptive of the "Great Salt Lake Route," write 
W. H. Snedaker, General Agent, 14 Montgomery Street. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 




NO leader of cotillions, manager of private theatricals 
and frequent diner-out is more popular in society 
circles than big Ray Sherman who a few years ago, in ad- 
dition to his social accomplishments, was the football idol 
of the State University. During part of the Christmas 
holidays he was a guest at a Marin County house party. 
On the morning fixed for his return to the city, while 
wearing a new suit of tweed, made expressly for this 
visit and somewhat hurriedly put together, he had the 
misfortune in vaulting over a fence, to split open a long 
seam in his trousers. The only other costume he had with 
him was his evening dress, and he could not very well 
travel homeward in his swallow-tail coat, especially as he 
was to accompany two young ladies, who were also guests 
at the same house. During his college days Ray had in 
emergencies, learned to use his needle, so hurrying to his 
room, he gathered together the ends of the rent and 
sewed it up as best he could. This amateur expedient 
served its purpose so long as Sherman remained in a 
standing position. But, having neglected to insert a 
piece of cloth in the rent, when he took his seat in the 
carriage to be driven to the train, he was horrified to 
hear an ominous report like the breaking up of a glacier 
in the spring. 

"What's that?'' asked one of the startled girls. 

Ray knew only too well that the long seam had re- 
opened, but he tried to look unconscious and suggested 
that it was probably the effect of the rain on the trees. 
He had no overcoat to cover the weak spot in his armor, 
so he bad to stand up against the wall of the little railway 
station and when the party boarded the train, Sherman 
backed away from the train with the politeness of a 
Chesterfield of the old school. That trip to town was a 
memorable one to the wretched Ray, and aged him more 
than the invention of forty new figures for the German. 
His misery was partially alleviated when on the ferry he 
fortunately encounted a friend, whom he forcibly des- 
poiled of an overcoat to hide the cause of his woe. The 
worst of it all was that the girls somehow discovered the 
cause of their escort's unhanpiness and the story was too 
good to keep. They smile now when Sherman boldly turns 
his back and walks calmly away from them. 



One peculiarity about Willie K. Ball, the art connoisseur 
and society favorite, is his delight in accomplishments 
which are usually deemed purely feminine. He uses the 
needle and the crochet hook deftly, and frequently pre- 
sents to admiring lady friends samples of his skill in fine 
sewing and embroidery. As may be imagined, these 
idiosyncracies do not generally endear Ball to men at first 
glance, although he has a wide circle of intimates whom he 
periodically invites to entertainments at his rooms. He 
gave a holiday card party, at which a dozen men were 
present, and when the throats of all were parched with 
many cigarettes, his historian relates that Ball produced 
a one quart bottle of beer, while two dozen eyes anxiously 
followed the movements of the host. Placing the bottle on 
the table with a bang, Willie turned to his guests in a 
spirit of true hospitality. 

"See here,'' he said. "This is Christmas week, and you 
fellows don't get home until you drink every drop of that.'' 
* * * 

" Peck " Eppinger is chiefly remarkable for the good 
times he has, and the young merchant obtained his soubri- 
quet in the gay Bohemian circles which he frequents. He 
celebrated one particular night of the holidays in right 
royal style, and every individual who crossed his path 
quaffed champagne at " Peck's " expense. His culminat- 
ing act of entertainment was the scattering of gold coins 
among the scrambling crowd who surrounded his carriage 
as he started from one resort to another. As he was 
about to depart, a policeman thoughtlessly appeared on 



the scene, and as "Peck " considered this intrusion a per- 
sonal reflection, he displayed such forcible resentment that 
the cop uninvited entered Eppinger's carriage and accom- 
panied him, despite his protests, to the nearest police sta- 
tion. After the little matter of bailing him out had been 
accomplished through the offices of a faithful friend, the 
latter ordered the cabman to drive directly to the Eppin- 
ger home. "Peck" objected so strenuously to this 
arrangement that his friend was constrained to break 
" Peck's " walking stick over its owner's head, which dis- 
cipline reduced the festive Eppinger to as meek a state 
of compliance as could be desired. With an achmg head 
and an indistinct recollection of the manner in which he 
had received his injuries, on the following day "Peck" 
sought out his good Samaritan and requested his company 
to police headquarters. 

"What do you want to go there again for?" asked the 
astonished friend. " Haven't you had enough ? You take 
my advice, and give the police a wide berth." 

"Oh, I am going to prefer charges against the cop," re- 
plied " Peck." 

•' What for ? " was the disgusted query. 

" For clubbing me over the head in the carriage," re- 
joined "Peck," innocently, rubbing his head with a ten- 
der hand. 

It is reasonably certain that the PoHce Commissioners 
will never be called upon to investigate that particular 
charge of clubbing against the patrolman. 



Governor Budd has never been suspected of possessing 
a forgiving spirit, and it is his boast that he forgets an in- 
jury only when he has repaid his enemy with liberal inter- 
est. He has squared up most of his debts of malice, but 
he sorrowfully admits that there is one big account upon 
which he still occupies the wrong side of the ledger. Dur- 
ing the gubernatorial campaign two years ago. nothing 
caused Budd so great perturbation as the "Nancy" car- 
toons drawn by that cynical artist, Clarence Webster. 
Budd never encountered the artist, although when the 
bloom is on the rye. he has frequently expressed in fero- 
cious language a strong desire for a personal interview 
with Webster in a sealed apartment. At a holiday dinner 
given in San Francisco, the Governor was seated next to 
a mild-looking, spectacled gentleman, who proved a most, 
entertaining table companion. The Governor had failed 
to catch the name of his neighbor, who told quaint stories 
with the dry wit which has given the artist-humorist high 
rank as a raconteur. As the dinner ended, Budd expressed 
his gratification at meeting his witty companion, and 
begged to inquire his name. 

"Webster," demurely replied that gentleman. 

"And your business?" continued the Chief Executive of 
the State. 

"Newspaper artist," said Webster, with imperturbable 
gravity. Noting Budd's savage look of interrogation, he 
continued serenely: "Yes, I drew those cartoons you are 
thinking about." 

The Governor's face was a study. He felt he had been 
caught in a trap, and that some courtesy had been squeezed 
out of him under false pretences. He turned the famous 
Stockton purple hue and almost foamed at the mouth. He 
struggled with himself for several minutes, and then ex- 
ploded. 

"Well," he finally roared, banging his fist upon the 
table, "I suppose it's a case of every man to his trade, 
but I'm damned if I like yours!" 
# * * 

Oh, wonderful figures have they— 
These nymphs of the Hying ballet ! 

To see them 0' nights 

In their neatly filled tights 
Is worth all the fee that we pay. 
As an ocular vision tbey seem 
A beautiful tlesh-and-blood dream, 

But nobody knows 

What those tights would disclose 
should the tell-tale X-ray on them gleam ! 

The handsomest calendars for 1897, besides all other kinds of 
stationery, are to be had of Cooper & Co., the Market Street 
stationers. This firm only carries the finest qualities of such goods 
and if you buy there you will be assured satisfaction. 



Janu.r 



SAN FRANCISCO XI5WS LETTER. 



i ChiUtmsu 

I V. La M ■ ■ 

on horticultural topics at his office ia tins city. 

tnd, in hi* time 
c pretty pranks at the expense o( hi-fi 
Mr. La Motte ia mi* h interested in immigration, which he 

- hard to pi ii, incidentally, it maybe - 

Uwt he is one of the best informed men in tli. 

lurces and possibilities. In the furth. 
of his plans to attract desirable settler-, he writes many 
rn residents. One ol his correspondents 
>1 to have an insatiable thirst for information about 
California, and. as soon as Mr. La Motte had answered 
one batch of questions, along would come another series of 
queries, with hypercritical comments on the facts a> they 
were sent to him. 

Mr. La Motte became very tired of his correspondent, 
realizinj: that he was simply wasting his time. The climax 
came when the Eastern man wrote recently, asking if it 
were true that Californians wen- preyed upon by partic- 
ularly vicious fleas. La Motte replied that this was a big 
State, inhabited by big people, and turning out big pro- 
ducts, with fleas of proportionate size to the magnificent 
dimensions of everything else. He had just found on his 
ranch a ground insect two inches long, resembling the flea 
in form, but of quite different habits and pursuits. The 
Mexicans call it •' the deer killer," from a legend that, 
when deer sleep, it bores into their ears and causes death. 
For his correspondent's better information, he forwarded 
this formidable-looking insect as a specimen of the Califor- 
nia flea, attaching it to a bit of cardboard labeled " with 
the compliments of the season." Mr. La Motte chuckles 
to himself as he pictures the horror of his correspondent 
at sight of the mammoth 'flea." This object lesson pro- 
bably constitutes the closing chapter of that correspond- 



At the recent Horse Show, many curious eyes peeped 
into the stall of the brown broodmare, Tone, winner of 
first prize in her class. Horsemen accorded her the close 
inspection and homage due "the mother of a record- 
breaker," for Tone has earned that enviable distinction 
and a lasting place in turf history as the dam of Agitato, 
2:09}, holder of the world's record for three-year-old 
pacers. Agitato's brilliant campaign on the Montana and 
California circuits is a matter of great pride to John F. 
Boyd, owner of Tone, and, from all appearances, Mr. Boyd 
will continue to produce such racing phenomenons. His 
"Owyhee" (by Charles Derby, 2:20) also a blue-ribbon win- 
ner at the show, went through the circuit last summer 
without losing a single heat, and took a record of 2:24, be- 
coming, thereby, the champion two-year-old trotter of the 
Pacific Coast for 1896. Among the pacers at the exhibi- 
tion, Mr. Boyd's two-year-old, "Kawookum," attracted 
general attention. He is brother to the great Diablo, who 
had a record of 2:094 as a four-year-old. In the yearling 
class, Mr. Boyd exhibited the most promising youngster 
of the year, royally bred and perfectly proportioned, viz., 
Goodway, a bay colt by Steinway, and brother to Charles 
Derby, the sire of Diablo, Owyhee, and Kawookum. Bar- 
ring accident, he will add to the laurels already won by 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm. The blue ribbon in the two- 
year-old filly class properly went to Oakwood Belle. She 
appropriately takes her Dame from the farm, and a more 
stylish Miss never walked in aristocratic horsedom. 

John F. Boyd's mining career, a part of the State's suc- 
cessful history, bids fair to be surpassed by his horse- 
breeding operations. On his Oakwood Park Stock Farm, 
in Contra Costa County, are horses rich • in the most 
valued blood lines of the standard-bred trotter; lines that 
make the production of an Agitato or a Diablo, reasonably 
certain. These blood lines, too, are found transmitting 
their qualities of speed and stamina to the superb style of 
the carriage horses, bred by Mr. Boyd. 

Of all the banquet halls in the city that of the Maison Eiche. is 
undoubtedly the finest. The accommodations are perfect and the 
service excellent, and the largest f urrtiens can te hdd Ihne. 

The most elegant neckwear of the season is to be had of John 
AV. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. All late importations. 



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LAUNDRY: Twelfth St.. bet. Folsom and Howard, S. F. 
All ordinary mending, sewing on buttons, etc., free of 
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Work called for and delivered to any part of the city free of 
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Pacific Towel Company 



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Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates: Clean hand 
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SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 




The Book For the last four or five years Mr. I. Zang- 
of will has contributed to the Pall Mall Maga- 

The Week* zine a department entitled "Without Pre- 
judice," in which he has commented on men, 
women, life, manners, and literature. Such of these com- 
ments as do not depend upon the books, plays, or pictures 
of others, he has gathered together into this volume. In 
the course of these essays he is humorous, witty, sarcastic, 
caustic, paradoxical, and heterodoxical, but never dull. 
Though be uses the phrase 'without prejudice," he does 
not wish it to be understood that he has no positive con- 
victions. He very truly says that to the common man 
every strong statement that does not tally with his own 
invertebrate ignorance seems to be a prejudiced one; 
whereas on the lips of a man of intelligence and culture it 
is the utterance of conviction upon good grounds and 
mature reflection. Prejudice is an unreasoning pre- 
possession for or against a thing or person: postjudice is 
something quite different. Open the book where one will, 
one is struck by the insight and levelheadedness everywhere 
displayed. Among other aspects of this wide and wicked 
world Mr. Zangwill has carefully observed table-turning, 
spirit rapping, the planchette. and other phenomena of 
"Borderland," and analyses them in a clear and convinc- 
ing manner. He makes it plain that, though he may now 
and then have yielded to these "intellectual whoredoms" 
(to borrow an apt phrase of Mr. Mallock), he has never 
permitted his will or his intelligence to be debauched by 
them. Like most clever men, Mr. Zangwill is not averse 
to raising the hair of the hyper-pious by taking an ancient 
and venerable maxim and standing it upon its head. To 
this another very brilliant man — Oscar Wilde — was much 
addicted, and many amusing examples of this tendency 
are to be found in his volume of essays entitled "Inten- 
tions," but with Wilde paradox making had become a 
trick and degenerated into a mannerism. In Zangwill's 
writing the paradox merely flashes across the page 
like a streak of forked lightning, startling us by its 
sudden glare. On page^ Ho and 111 of this volume is a 
letter addressed by Zangwill to Wilde parodying the 
latter's style, in the course of which he says: "I say these 
things to make it quite clear to you that I speak to you 
more in anger than in sorrow. You are much too im- 
portant to be discussed seriously, and if I take the trouble 
to give you advice, it is only because I am so much 
younger than you." All who are familiar with Wilde's 
style will acknowledge this to be an excellent imitation. 
In a little two-page essay on "The Franchise Farce" our 
author falls foul of the capitalists who defend bribery on 
the ground that universal suffrage is so great a menace 
to the safety and well-being of the community that it be- 
comes necessary to nullify it by universal corruption. He 
justly says that to enfranchise the negro and then to 
render his vote nugatory by false counting is to set up a 
double standard of morals, which infects the whole nation, 
and spreads into every department of the national life. 
The kind of corrupt thinking thus engendered was very 
clearly shown at the recent Presidential election, when 
millions of voters proved their willingness to repudiate 
half of the nation's debts, and spend the nation's money in 
buying silver from its producers at twice the market 
value. The remarks "Concerning General Elections," "In 
Defeneeof Gambling," on "Art in England," "Love in 
Life and Literature," are all lively, attractive, and full of 
suggestion. Zangwill seems to have quite shaken off all 
prejudice (in the unfavorable sense), and to see things 
straight and clear, in their true relations: he does not 
seem to be the victim of excess of patriotism, race-feeling, 
bias for or against revealed religion, or any form of un- 
reason whatever. Like all persons of intelligence and in- 
sight, he is at heart an aristocrat, that is, he thinks that 
the foolish people are, at present, in a terribly over- 
whelming majority all around and about us in the wide 
world, and that it can never be right that the foolish 
should rule the wise. 

* Without Prejudice. By 1. Zangwill, New York: the Century 
Co. Price tl.M). 



In an essay on "The influence of names" Mr. Zangwill 
elaborates an ingenious theory that a large proportion of 
eminent writers in English have an "r" in their names. 
If you run through the authors' names that come into 
your mind you will be surprised how often the fateful 'r' 
appears. Among dead novelists alone think of Thackeray, 
Charles Dickens, Walter Scott. Charles Reade, George 
Eliot (Marian Evans), Bulwer Lytton, Charlotte Bronte 
(Currer Bell). Trollope. Disraeli. Kate Douglas Wiggin, 
having acquired the necessary 'r' by becoming Mrs. 
Riggs, has published her first long story, "Marm Lisa," 
in which she manifests an intimate acquaintance with 
kindergarten work, and much sympathy with young 
children. Mrs. S. Cora Grubb, the foolish, ignorant. 
hysterical creature, who attends to everything but her 
obvious duties, and bemuddles her pate with cheiromancy, 
astrology, theosophy, Christian science, Edenism, 
hypnotism, spiritualism, and every vain thing imagined by 
the incurably feeble-minded, is capitally drawn. The 
poor, half-idiotic Lisa, under the fostering care of 
Mistress Mary and her kind assistants, is rescued from 
her mental darkness, and in the crowning episode of the 
book displays positive heroism. The story is well written 
and the interest is sustained to the very end. 

Marm Lisa, by Kate Douglas Wiggin. Houghton Mifflin I 
Boston and New York. 1S07. Price, $1. 

It is amusing to observe the ideas of propriety enter- 
tained by the editors of different magazines. In the 
November issue of a certain five-cent periodical there 
appeared a cut of Miss Cissy Fitzgerald from a photo- 
graph by Sarony of Xew York, in which that sprightly 
young person appears with her right leg gayly thrown 
over her left, incidentally displaying a good deal of black 
stocking and white lace. In the December issue of 
another five-cent magazine appears a reproduction of the 
same photograph, with the offending limb and the shock- 
ing lace cut off, but still showing the skirts thrown up. 
Yet probably both these editors would readily enough 
Press pass-t the doorkeeper of the theatre to see the 
actual leg (to say nothing of the vivacious Cissy's wicked 
wink), from the reproduction of a picture of which as a 
magazine cut one of them at any rate shrinks. Again: a 
popular ten-cent magazine famous for its reproductions of 
photographs of actresses, and of pictures displaying the 
female form as nearly nude as possible, recently sent back 
to us as "hardly proper for reproduction" some photo- 
graphs of South Sea Island women, which were after- 
wards reproduced in a 25-cent magazine devoted to the 
cause of home education, edited by a Doctor of Divinity, 
and contributed to by some of the best known writers of 
the day. 

Messrs. Gelett Burgess and Porter Garnett have con- 
solidated themselves into a publishing firm, and are about 
to issue "Seen and Unseen; or the Monologues of a Home- 
less Snail," a collection of songs by a young Japanese 
gentleman named Yone Xoguchi. He is a graduate of the 
University of Tokio, and was for some time secretary to 
the Editor of a Tokio magazine. He has written articles 
in his own tongue on California scenery, and has edited a 
newspaper for bis countrymen in this city. Much of his 
time in California has been spent upon Joaquin Miller's 
ranch, where he rambles, dreams, and writes. The new 
firm intends soon to issue a "bi-weekly" review, to be en- 
titled "Phyllida, or the Milkmaid," and to be devoted to 
literary topics, short essays, and the doings of town and 
country. Whether we are to expect the periodical to ap- 
pear once in two weeks, or twice a week, it is impossible 
to say. The term "bi-monthly" involves the same ambig- 
uity, but in that case it is easily avoided by the use of 
"fortnightly, " which can mean nothing else but once in 
fourteen nights. 

Mrs. Anna Bowman Dodd, author of a pleasant, gossipy, 
if rather gushing little book describing visits to several 
cathedrals in the West and South of England, is about to 
publish a volume, the scene of which is laid in that curious 
and little known region, the Broads of Norfolk. The book 
is to be published by the Macmillan Co., and adorned with 
many sketches by Joseph Pennell. It will, doubtless, pre- 
sent an interesting picture of a remarkable part of old 
England, that is full of quaint characters. 



January 2, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



I'rophetic Vision o( the Cominir V 

Promoting Oompaoy, b an ac- 
count of how San r'rancisco was saved from 

1 by the Japanese fleet. Tli. 
General Sir Patrick McDennott of t lie Uritisli Arm] 

■ill from thing machines little original pa 
high explosives upon the decks of the enemy's battleships, 
do not know exactly what the company which 
publishes this brochurt intends to promote, but th;it it is 
not the writing of good English may l>o gathered from a 
single sentence describing the condition of San Francisco 
in 1899. "The afliliatea colleges ami the great Sutro 
library were now attended by the studious youth, and the 
vanity fair, the mental acrobat, and the I 1 >play 

of the lovely sex " How a library can be attended by a 
fair, and a college by a display, is not clear. For the resl 
the production is poorly and inaccurately printed, and 
contains many minor errors and absurdities. 

A calendar for 1807 has been prepared by N. W. Ayer 
& Son, the newspaper advertising agents, of Philadelphia, 
which is the most useful of the many we have seen thus 
far. The dates are printed in large type and can be read 
across a room, and its general handsome appearance 
makes it worthy a place in any library or office. For the 
sum of 2.i cents this calendar will be sent, securely packed, 
to any address in the country. 

The Christmas number of the Los Angeles Capital was a 
beauty in every sense of the word. It reflects much credit 
upon those in charge, and will undoubtedly be appreciated 
in other places besides Los Angeles. 

THE successful transmission of electric power from 
Newcastle to Sacramento, a distance of thirty miles, 
is one of the most notable events of the month in California. 
At Newcastle the electric energy is generated from the 
water power of the South Yuba Canal Company. A few 
years ago such long distance transmission of electricity 
for power purposes was regarded as wholly impracticable. 
Now that the contrary has been abundantly demonstrated, 
the prospect is that with improved appliances and in- 
creased knowledge of electrical phenomena, much of the 
water power now idle will be employed to advantage in 
this way. 

M OST of the efforts to set aside wills, upon the ground 
11 of undue influence, prove abortive. It is a sound 
principle of the law that undue influence is not to be pre- 
sumed unless unfair advantage has manifestly been taken 
of some relation of trust and confidence by the benefi- 
ciaries of the contested instrument. If men and women 
are not to be allowed to do with their property as they 
may see fit, wills would better be abolished. 



IT is related that a Jew and a Christian once argued with 
each other so candidly, as to the merits of their res- 
pective faiths, that at the close of the discussion the Jew 
became a Christian and the Christian a Jew. This has 
been regarded as a joke, but Professor Howison insists 
that a certain learned Eabbi is in reality a Christian, 
while, on the other hand, the Rabbi is equally positive that 
the Professor's so-called Christian philosophy is nothing 
more than Judaism. Thus extremes meet. 



NOWHEEE in the world will be found so beautiful a 
Park as to that to which we can lay claim. Our 
illustration this week shows one especially picturesque 
spot in it, the Huntington Palls, with its placid lake shel- 
tered from the wind, where one can enjoy an hour's boat- 
ing. The dreamy beauty of the place must be seen to be 
fully appreciated. 

Ideal Champagne. 
With due deference to the well-known £astidiou9 proclivities of 
California Champagne consumers, Messrs. Moet & Chandon, who, 
as is well known, are the largest vineyard owners in the Champagne, 
have concluded to ship henceforth their renowned "White Seal 
Grande Cuvee" to this Coast. This brand is celebrated as a great 
favorite among the select circles in London and other large cities in 
Europe, it being a clean and deliciously dry wine, and the " White 
Seal Grande Cuvee" is also bound to become popular here with 
people of a discriminating palate. 

Kelly's Corn Cure never fails. 26 cents. 102 Eddy street. 




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ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Alta Stiver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Looa ■ 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Gold Hill Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 14th day of December, 1896, an assessment (No. 54), of Five cents 

fier share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

18th DAY OF J A.NUARY, 1897, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on the 8th day of February, 1897, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. E. JABOBUS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

PROF. A. LOISETTE'S 

ASSIMILATIVE MEMORY SYSTEM. 

The fast, most complete and perfect edition. 
MIND-WANDERING CURED. SPEAKING WITHOUT NOTES. 

Handsomely bound, with portrait and autograph. Price 
$2 50 American, 10s. 6d. English. Prospectus with opin- 
ions of Educators, Scientific Professional and Business 
Men all over the world FREE. Address, A. LOISETTE, 
237 Fifth Avenue, New York, or 200 Regent St., London. 
Not sold elsewhere. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 





; We obey no wand but pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



W 



fERE is a Paris correspondent's account 
of the Divine Sarah in a new measure 
of immortality: " Lorenzo the Degenerate, or 
accio 'I' MSdicis is from first to last, 
as given at the Renaissance, un article de 
Paris. I mean the characters, for the ac- 
cessories are purely Renaissance and Florentine. Perhaps 
it is as well that whim and fancy should predominate in 
the personations — or rather personation, for there is but 
one player in the drama, Mme. Sarah Bernhardt. She is 
stage manager, star, everything; the others are merely 
well-broken-in foils. Musset's drama has been so adapted 
for her as to be a monologue, broken by answers or ob- 
servations to serve as rests, or bring out more clearly the 
drift of the play. During these pauses for the title-role, 
Lorenzo glides stealthily into corners. Lorenzaccio is 
neither he, she, nor it, but an oblique, enigmatic third-sex 
being, who never shows himself plainly until the drop-cur- 
tain scene. And then one feels that one only knows about 
a few of his vices. The rest are still bis own secret. In 
this part Sarah Bernhardt is a curious creature — interest- 
ing, fascinating, though slightly sickening. There is a 
good deal of the leopard or the panther in her gracile ways 
and remorseless ferocity. She is through and through 
corrupt and immoral; but no more conscious of her state 
than if she were a feline of the desert. 

"It is marvelous how a single player can fill the four 
acts, and in a drama with a chief character who is all dis- 
simulation. There are only here and there a few out- 
bursts of genuine feeling. The revelation of the scheme in 
which the whole plot lies is less than gradual. If there 
were passionate outbursts and thrilling by-play, the drama 
would miss its mark. Besides, Lorenzo is not only an 
Italian, but a Florentine. He would not let his own mother 
divine his thoughts. When soliloquizing, he remembers 
that walls have ears. 

"Another of the difficulties surmounted is having to wear 
a single costume from the beginning of the first act to the 
close of the drop-curtain scene. I think Sarah Bernhardt 
plumper than she used to be. The make-up of her face 
gives her a striking resemblance to Sir Henry Irving, 
with a something that reminds one of Sardou. Her am- 
bition is to out-Irving Irving in a transposition of his Ham- 
let to the key of Lorenzaccio, and by keeping close to him 
— without exactly copying him — in plastic poses, get-up, 
expression, mannerisms, and the show of an all-absorbing 
personality. Mme. Bernhardt is a she or third-sex Irving, 
or a transubstantiation of Sir Henry, whimsical, curious, 
amusing in a subtle way, and by no means caricatural. 
The hair of the great actress this time is cut short, in the 
Florentine sixteenth-century fashion, but clusters round 
the forehead. The doublet fits like a jersey, and the baggy 
shorts have a petticoatish air akin to knickers, though 
they do not descend farther than half-way to the knees." 
# * # 

I do not feel myself in the proper mood to grapple with 
the theatrical past of '96. The Christmas shows have lost 
me my balance and authority. I joy in a spectacular 
present glittering with sleek, shimmering seraphim. There 
are heavier pens than mine to make statistics of the dead. 
Out of a town full of ballets, I choose the Orpheum for my 
flowers. There the ballet bids fair to carry the holiday 
spirit some weeks into the new year. It was a tremen- 
dous undertaking for Manager Walter, engaging these 
fifty or more dancers and their directors, in addition to 
the otherwise expensive show billed, but the venture has 
been a success from every standpoint, and it is, perhaps, 
the best advertisement the Orpheum has ever had. What- 
ever little irregularities in the lights and the dancers, 
which may have marred the opening performance, are 
now, happily, nowise in evidence. Kiralfy has instilled 
immeasurable ginger in the girls; they dance with splendid 
enthusiasm, even wildly at times, and yet there is discip- 
line, surety, and a well-balanced picture in the ensemble. 



The flying ballet is, of course, a question of mechanism and 
effects, and of more interest as a novelty than as a serious 
phase of ballet work, but it enhances illusion, and gives 
graceful sky effect to the stage picture. 

Abachi and Maschand do a remarkable acrobatic turn, 
and the three Misses Dunbar, besides assisting in the ballet, 
still sing their coster songs, and expose their little spectac- 
ular panties. 

# • * 

Jack and tin Beanstalk has made a surprisingly big hit at 
the Tivoli, where, from all appearances, it will be con- 
tinued several weeks to come. There are less gags than 
usual, and more crisp music, and the transformation scene 
is of particular brilliancy and beauty. All the favorites 
and several new people are in the cast. 

# # * 

The popular Frawleys have put in a busy holiday week 
with three of their last season's plays, His Wifi '« Fathi r, 
Tin Great Unknown, and Men and Women, all of which have 
been reviewed in earlier issues of the News Letter. Sun- 
day night's performance of Men uwl Women closes the 
Frawley engagement at the Columbia. 

# # * 

Denman Thompson's rural classic, 'J'/ir Old Homestead, 
comes to the Baldwin Monday night. I have not seen 
the cast, but the press-agent says, "it is the strongest 
that has ever enacted this pretty ideal of New England 
life; and its musical features, being rendered by a selected 
choir of twenty trained voices, adds greatly to the charm. 
By playing at the Baldwin The Ola Homestead not only 
offers luxurious seats and surroundings to the average 
theatre-goer who loves this old play, but it will give 
society in general, and country-club people in particular, 
a delightful picture of rustic life.' 1 

# # * 

Next week the bill at the Orpheum will be further 
strengthened by four new acts, prominent among which is 
Hallen and Fuller, in a comedy sketch, An Artist and Hit 
Model. The first-mentioned name is that of our old farce- 
comedy friend, Fred Hallen, of Hallen and Hart fame. 
The second is Mollie Fuller, his wife. The other new people 
are: Miss Anna Caldwell, singing comedienne; the two 
Bostons, English eccentriques, and Charles Wayne, late of 
Lillian Russell's company, in a monologue. 

While it may be disclosing some of the many surprises 
Mr. Joseph Murphy has in store for the Columbia patrons, 
I cannot resist publishing in full this little prose poem, 
which I have just received from his press agent : 

Let any blast patron of the theatre who remembers seeing Joseph 
Murphy in his Irish play, 8haun /,',<»«, ten or a dozen years ago, sie 
the same actor to-day in the same play, and he will probably lea\e 
the theatre when the curtain cornea down on the last act, and not 
before. More than that, he will find his way homeward, meditating 
and wondering how it is that Mr. Murphy has retained his youthful 
good looks, his graceful legs, and nimble feet, and his sweet, strong, 
manly singing voice It is a conundrum that can only be answered 
by proving that it is true as stated, just as Mr. Mnrpby presents the 
proof each time he appears as Larry Donovan and Shaun Rhue. 
The rendition of the song, " A Handful of Earth," by Larry, while 
kneeling at his mother's grave, after having been driven away from 
his home, is a benediction. 

Mr. Murphy will commence a fortnight's engagement at 
the Columbia on Monday, presenting for the first week 
ShaunRkue. The regular popular prices of the Columbia 
will prevail. 

AS we go to press news comes to us of the death of 
Joseph B. McCullagh. editor-in-chief of the St. Louis 
Daily-Globe Democrat. Mr. McCullagh worked his way 
up from a reporter to the responsible position he occupied 
at the time of his death. He had been ailing for some 
time and for the last few days had edited his paper from 
the sick room. A more able all-round newspaper man 
never lived, and the excellence of his paper was largely 
due to his untiring efforts. 

THE late J. Ross Jackson, who expired in this city last 
Wednesday, was one of the best known newspaper 
men on the Coast. Of late years he had retired from 
active journalism but still kept in touch with his old 
associates, by all of whom he will long be mourned. 



January 3, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'.» 



THE PLEASURES OF RUIN. 



Tally mar\ 1 
how ; me under adversity— 

Ullages in the Btl 
ruin, which, if not quite so int 

or Memory, or Imagination, do much ' 
us to the change in our circumstances. Die tirst feeling 
is one of extreme relief that the whole thing is over anil 
we are out of si The smash has come; writs and 

attachments have blossomed into sheriff's officers and the 
auctioneer, whose fell and inexorable hammer has made 
short work of our goods and chattels; our wealthy friends 
have said just what we expected, and Brown, who used to 
hole dinners and twenty-dollar pieces at us whenever he 
met us before, now crosses over to the opposite side of the 
The cheap lodgings in the shady neighborhood 
have become stern and ineradicable facts, and we can 
look about us at last and endeavor to make the best of the 
position. But now you have a newly-acquired sense of free- 
dom, to which, perhaps, you have longbecn astranger, II is 
no longer a question whether you shall dine at Delmonioo's 
or the Maison Riche, but in all probability the choice will 
lie— if your taste still inclines to the French menu, of the 
dim i- ■ /, jour of six courses for twenty-five cents, or, if 
your fancy lies more in the American style, one of the 
popular-price restaurants, three dishes for a quarter. No 
longer will the varying merits of chicken gumbo, or turtle 
soup, salmon mayonnaise, and aspic of lobster, truffled 
turkey, and oyster stuffed capon come between you and 
your night's rest. Again, your present circumstances are 
such that you are no longer harassed by the touters for 
subscriptions, male and female, and, therefore, you find it 
needless to discuss the comparative merits of the claims 
put forward by the friends of the Cannibal Islanders for 
Worcestershire sauce, or by the friends of the Mayor of 
Milpitas for a drinking fountain, to be placed in the plaza 
in honor of that distinguished grocer and municipal chief. 

When you go to the theatre or opera you are no longer 
compelled to pay fifty or a hundred per cent, for the privi- 
lege of receiving your ticket from an agent, and you go 
to the gallery, where, if the peanuts and lager beer are a 
bit of a nuisance at first, you soon get accustomed to it; 
at any rate, you are permitted to hear the play without 
being bored by one of Brown's "good stories" during 
the prima donna's chief aria, or while the eminent trage- 
dian is giving some fine piece of declamation. 

In fact, you discover sources of gratuitous amusement 
which indifference has, hitherto, hidden from you. Instead 
of the sojourn at B'lingham or Del Monte, you enjoy your- 
self with the attractions at the Park, at Sutro Heights, 
or a five-cent ride to Ingleside, and a stroll along the Ala- 
meda from there to the beach, or, if your fancy takes you 
across the bay, a day at Leona Heights, where you can 
enjoy the fresh air. which you will come to think as pleas- 
ant as at Santa Cruz or at other resorts you may have 
been in the habit of visiting at a much greater distance 
from the city. 

But the time when you do really enjoy the " Pleasures of 
Ruin" is when that exquisite moment comes — which it 
will, sooner or later, when a temporary, or it may be a 
permanent, change in your fortunes takes place. If you 
are an author, your book has found a publisher; if an art- 
ist, your picture a buyer; or some one pays up an old debt, 
or some distant relative mentions your name in his will. 
Whatever it may be, the keen appreciation of the benefits 
we formerly enjoyed, which our vicissitudes have taught 
us, and the knowledge we have acquired of the dingier 
side of nature, give a remarkable zest to our return to a 
brighter life. And if a man has good health and spirits he 
will find that it is as true that " hope springs eternal in 
the human breast " as that when things are at their 
worst they mend; and, if he be of an extra-hopeful disposi- 
tion, he will welcome the increased depression of his for- 
tunes as a sure forerunner of a change of luck. 



Paso Robles. 
Our new mud bath house is finished. The arrangement of baths, 
dressing rooms, etc., are on the same fioor. No stairs or steps to 
climb. Wi are now unquestionably the finest sanitarium or health 
resort on the Pacific Coast. Rest and health seekers are Paso Eohles 
seekers, Rates, $10, $12.50, $ 15, and $17.50 per week. Climate warm. 



THE sentiment of the [rrifftt! -ona 

■f the 
Wesl must !>o reclaimed. Thi- 

The great difficulty in the w« 
omplisbment is the lacs ofwafa it is pro 

the avid lands to the Stat< 

s|uv(ively. and that loans from the National Treasury, or 
of the National credit, to the extent of a million dollars to 

each State, be made for the purpose of reclaiming the 
ceded lands. It is a great scheme, with magnificent op- 
portunities for jobs. 

THE Improvement of our navigable rivers, by means of 
dredging, debris dams, levees, cul-olTs and 
means, with incidental aid to hydraulic mining, is to be 
one of the most important matters before the 1 legislature 
this winter. The Sacramento river, in particular, calls 
for attention. It should be practicable, at this late day, 
to unite upon a scheme advantageous to all concerned. 

IP, as Congressman Loud contends, it costs the Govern- 
ment from |20, nun. nun to (40, 11110,1100 a year to carry 
serial novels and "sample copy" newspapers in the mails, 
there is need of amending the postal laws. The carriage 
of mail matter at a cost of twelve cents a pound, with a 
charge to the public of only one cent, would appear to be 
bad business. 

CHICAGO is reaching out energetically for the trade of 
China. It might be well for San Francisco to put 
forth a little effort in the same direction. 

Bl I ' T"L 1 AL. Hatman & Co., (Incorporated) 

aldvVin I neatre- ' proprietors : 

Sunday night, Jan. 3d: Last time Palmer Cox's "Brownies. 1 ' 
Beginning Monday, January 4th, Denman Thompson's famous 
Play, 

THE OLD HOMESTEAD. 

The original Old Homestead Double Quartette. Select com- 
pany of twenty-three players Wonderful electrical effects. 

Gi i ' TL -L The"Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

1 U m D 1 8 I heaXre ■ Frledlander, Gottlob & Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 

One week. Commencing Monday, January 4th. Special en- 
gagement of the legitimate Irish comedian, JOSEPH MUR- 
PHY, supported by his New York Stock Company, in the com- 
panion drama to " Kerry Gow," entitled; 



SHAUN RHUE, 



Introducing Mr. Murphy's world-famous song, 
Earth ." Reserved seats, nights, 25c. 50c, 75c, $1 
50c, and 75c. January 11th: KERRY GOW. 



'A Handful of 
matinees, 25c, 



Ol San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rPRGU m . street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Monday, January 4th. A brilliant opening 
of the New Year. 

HALLEN X> FULLER, 

America's comedy Sketch artists; the Two Bostons, grotesque 
comedians; Anna Caldwell, singing comedienne; Charles 
Wayne. America's premiere eccentrique; Nllsson's aerial ballet 
and Kiralfy's grand opera ballet, and a great vaudeville show. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Matinee Prices : Parquet, any seat, 35c. ; balcony, any seat, 10c; 
children, 10c, any part. 

Mrs. Ernestine Kbblino, 

Proprietor and Manager 



Tivoli Opera House 

Our holiday spectacle, 

clAGK AND THE BEANSTALK. 

The King, the Queen, Jack, the Cow, the Giant, the Fairies, the 
Goddesses, the Mortals. Seats now on sale. 
Next opera-THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 
Popular Prices 250 and 50o 

I I ' J ry I The only perfect winter race track in 

Ingleside I rack, America 

PACIFIC COAST cJOGKEY CLUB. 

Racing from December 38th to January 0th, inclusive. Five or 
more races daily, rain or shine; first race at 3 p. m. 
Take Southern Pacific traiDS at Third and Townsend streets 
depot, leaving at one o'clock p. m. Fare for round trip, includ- 
ing admission to grounds, $1. Take Mission street electric line 
direct to track. 

The Pommery Sec Stakes, Tuesday, December 29th; the Cali- 
fornia Oaks, Thursday, December 31st; the Shrieve & Co. Cup, 
Friday, January 1st. 
W. S. Leake, Secretary. A. B. Spreckels, President. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Dec. 30, 1896. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six months ending December 30, 1896, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2, 1897. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 




The house of Rothschild is about 
The Expansion System the best advertised and the most 
Again at Work. badly abused firm in Europe. The 

name alone, like that of the Old 
Lady of Threadneedle street, is the synonym for financial 
solidity the world over, and, in connection with man or in- 
stitution, a sufficient sponsor for millions. Five out of 
every ten of the grandees who land in this town with a 
bounce and swagger in miningdom manage to have it leak 
out in the early stages of the game that they expect the 
homage due to agents of the great European financiers, 
who in this way are held responsible unwittingly by innum- 
erable shortcomings and absurdities, about which they are 
never likely to learn unless by sheer accident. Like the 
Rat-catcher to Her Brittanic Majesty, it is easy for any 
one to pose as agent on the lookout for a mine for the 
Rothschilds. Like all bankers and financial men of stand- 
ing abroad, they are approachable on business matters 
minus the ceremony attached to an interview with newly- 
gilded gingerbread in more modern communities, and it 
only requires money to tap a wire at any moment; so that, 
unless it comes to an actual showdown of credentials, it is 
a difficult matter to detect the fraud who may have the 
courtesy of a correspondent from this widely-respected 
firm without being upon friendly, let alone confidential, 
relations with it. These remarks are suggested by the 
way in which the firm was dragged into the Iron Mountain 
deal this week, in an utterly unwarranted manner. 

The story referred to goes or. to tell 

Evolution of a the good people of California about a 

Golden Butterfly, tremendous deal which has just been 

concluded here, involving the payment 
of $5,000,000 by the Rothschilds for the Iron Mountain 
mine of Shasta, which is accredited with being a copper 
deposit of more or less magnitude, according to the man- 
ner in which the description impresses the reader. The 
reason ascribed for this exciting move on the part of the 
London bankers is that they believe gold is about to be 
dethroned to make room on the top perch for copper. This 
whoop-up. with its 1800 additional men at work attach- 
ment, has been occasioned by the fact that some changes 
are about to be made in the construction of the English 
company which transformed the old Iron Mountain mine of 
Squaw Creek by purchase, some two years ago, into the 
Mountain Mines, Limited, of Keswick, California, with 
head offices at No. 3 Lombard street, London, E. C. The 
Mathesons of London were the prime movers in the enter- 
prise, and the connection of the Rothschild house is due to 
its business relations with this firm in the control of giant 
copper-producing mines in Spain. The new company has 
expended a large sum of money at Keswick (named after 
a director of the company), probably in the neighborhood 
of .siIhi.uihi. erecting smelters and constructing a railroad. 
The property cost, at the outside, $-!oii,iiiiu. in the first 
place, of which the original owners only got in the neigh- 
borhood of $1.")0,000, the balance being paid out to make a 
couple of promoters comfortable for life. This runs the 
total cost of the ground and works up to (750,000; or per- 
haps a little more — within $1,000,000 in any event. 

These figures are small, ranged along- 
Copper Crowned side of those of the new Mountain Cop- 
Metallic King. per Company, which has now absorbed 

the Shasta mines and property of the 
Mountain Mines, furnishing an object lesson for the former 
owners of the old Iron Mountain and other mining men of 
California of what the British promoter can achieve when 
he starts in. The share capital of the new concern amounts 
in round numbers to $6,250,000, including the purchase 
price of what is described us the New Jersey Metal Refin- 
ing Works, situate at Elizabeth, in the State of New Jer- 
sey. This must be a gigantic institution of its kind, judg- 
ing from the fact that, allowing the exceedingly liberal 
estimi "for the Keswick property, the sum 

of $5,250,000 is involved in the purchase of its plant. As 
an industrial enterprise, the promoters, who are evidently 



wise in their generation, will doubtless have little difficulty 
in raising the money they ask, eliminating as they are in a 
position to do, to a certain extent at least, the chances of 
mining. In view of the facts, however, it is difficult to 
recognize any warrant for the local announcement that 
the Messrs. Rothschild had invested $5,000,000 in the 
purchase of the California mines. The tendency to exag- 
geration in all matters pertaining to mining at present is 
not calculated to benefit the industry. It creates a bad 
impression abroad among people who know the true facts 
of the case, and disturbs confidence among investors. 

Mining operators of all degree in 

A Cautious Market this part of the world had better 

For Gold Mines. disabuse their minds of the idea that 

London and Paris are ready tt fall 
over head and heels in love with anything they may 
feel disposed to hurl at the natives. Who ever tells them 
so may mean well, but he does not know more than the 
law allows about the situation in either city. As a matter 
of fact, investors are more than ordinarily cautious in both 
of these burgs, and merit alone is sufficient to attract even 
investigation. Paris is absolutely dull for all mining in- 
vestments, the indifference of buyers being due entirely to 
the actions of promoters in forcing business beyond the 
sustaining power of the market which is now suffering 
from a bad attack of indigestion. London promoters are 
loaded down temporarily with industrial ventures, which 
are now the fad, so that little is done in foreign mines be- 
yond arranging for a coup or two in spring, when it is 
thought the public can be trusted to absorb a few shares 
which promise a fair working profit. At present, efforts 
are limited in this line to working off a few stocks of 
small concerns in Scotland and the provinces. 

The Pacific Coast Mining Agency 

A Local Mining Company has blossomed out dur- 

Development Company, ing the week, in the object of 

carrying on the purchase and 
sale of mines on an elaborate scale. The names of the men 
who stand sponsor for the reputation of the concern are 
well-known in the manufacturing and financial world, and 
in this respect the proposition is above reproach. The 
only trouble likely to arise is that the other manufacturers 
of mining machinery in this city may feel that their bus- 
iness prospects are jeopardized by a formidable rival of 
this kind, which is not making a new departure of the 
kind for the good of its promoter's health. If all the 
varied business interests connected with the mining 
industry get banded together in cliques to control the 
situation from the grass roots up, as well as down, we 
will have some lively times in town. The mine-owner cer- 
tainly will not be the loser in the competition for trade, if 
the promoter does. In Horatio Beveridge the new com- 
pany has a manager who understands the ropes, with 
foreign connections which should prove invaluable. 

The tone of the market on Pine street 
Business Dull is steady, notwithstanding that the dis- 
On Pine Street, position of operators is bearish in the 

extreme. The holidays may have some- 
thing to do with the dullness in trade. At any rate it is a 
valid excuse, and, it can only be hoped, a correct one. 
Ore is being extracted from the Chollar-Brunswick with- 
out much being said about the matter, the management 
evidently appreciating the fact that deeds, not words, 
must speak in the future. The proposition to start in at 
American Flat is again afoot. It is a pity that some of 
the big men in the business cannot be induced to take the 
initiative in the unwatering of mines in this district, 
which have always been handicapped by lack of proper 
attention. Work in this direction would likely be much 
more profitable than grubbing about upper levels on the 
Comstock. 

If the insurance men of this city 
are unable to arrive at an ar- 
rangement whereby they can 
pool their issues at a profit to 
all, the fraternity down South proposes to do so in self- 
protection. Strange to say, they have come to San Fran- 
cisco to find out how to do it, and have already succeeded 
pretty well in accomplishing the desired results. 



Los Angeles Fire 
Underwriters Combine. 



January 2, 1897. 



FRANC 11 u 



«5 




"Hortbe Crier!" "Wh»« thodOTll art thool" 
"Ooethal wlllpltv thedeTll.slr. wllh jou." 



THE Kxaminor has fallen all over itself with right 
horror at what it pleases to declare is personal malig- 
nity, wanton cruelty, and inhuman persecution on the part 
of Mr. Vining, in causing the arrest of one Albert Cliou, a 
newsboy, and has thrown itself into the breach with the 
rare heroism that invariably distinguishes that highly 
moral journil when it can tret a little free advertising by 
posing as a friend of the down-trodden and afflicted 
cording to his portrait in the sheet in question, Albert is 
rather a tough specimen of his kind, instead of the inno- 
cent, abused young hero depicted by the facile pen of a 
space writer in mortal terror of losing his job. Doubtless 
the youthful Albert deserves punishment in some form, 
but is it not rather more than he deserves to be defended 
by the Examiner? 

" XLNXIOUS Correspondent" bombards this office with 
J\ queries as to whether the Mrs. Lease who got 
mixed up the other day in a shooting scrape with her 
husband, on account of the attentions paid her by another 
man named Woods, is the silver-tongued Mary Yellin of 
Populistic and petticoated fame. No, it is not the same. 
To begin with, Papa Lease is too well trained to become 
mutinous, and domestic cares weigh too heavily upon him 
to keep tab on his wife. Besides, no man, unless he were 
drunk, would dream of making love to a rampant stump 
speaker like Mary. So far as she and her ilk are con- 
cerned, however, it would be a good idea for civic peace if 
they would all take to the Woods. 

H T_rHAT is justice?" bowled the speaker of the evening 
W at the meeting of the Socialist Labor Party one 
night this week. Justice, my wild-eyed bomb-thrower, is 
the power that is supposed to reach out and gather in 
criminals and disturbers of the peace, and were its laws in 
active operation in this city, it would be short grass and 
dry pickings for you and others of your ilk. We all know 
what Justice is, but cannot always locate her in San 
Francisco. 

S BURGLAR with long, bushy whiskers, choked a Pul- 
ton-street housekeeper into insensibility the other 
day, but we do not agree with the detectives now working 
on the case that the unknown thug was a well-known 
Police Court Judge on a Christmas spree. Innocent men 
have before this been the victims of purely circumstantial 
evidence. The Town Crier has frequently warned the 
Judge that his reckless extravagance in whiskers would 
get him into trouble. 

LOUISA Worthington, who has already had three 
trials, is now attempting the threadbare insanity 
dodge on a fourth one. The 'Susie Martin case has prob- 
ably given the murderess fresh courage to renew her 
battle against justice. A few wholesome life imprison- 
ments and hangings would have a highly beneficial effect 
upon the morals of this pistol-practicing community. 

SEVERAL more newly-fledged attorneys have been ad- 
mitted to practice by Supreme Court decree. When 
the number of lawyers in the city is taken into consider- 
ation, it is hardly surprising that they throng like vultures 
around an estate, and pounce with tiger-like clutches on 
the wills of the departed. The situation, after all, must 
be a desperate one. Even a lawyer has to live. 

TWO policemen having been dismissed from the force 
for drinking while on duty, the question now arises as 
to what we shall do for them. The Town Crier suggests 
that they be assigned to editorial positions on the 
Examiner. Their weakness will be their best qualification 
for the job. 

OAKLAND is going to raise potatoes a la Pingree. We 
wish her success. Her crop of fossils and cranks has 
been so prolific that there is no reason why the succulent 
and life-saving spud should not flourish there. 

IT does not require the wisdom of a seer to prophesy that 
W. H. T. Durrant will die of a peaceful old age. 



N 



JAKE RUDOLPH, the ..lout 

■ rin^r people with hot lend from .1 

•I conveniently for that purpose, and thai 

he does not know what he is doing when he la drunk, should 
be given several years behind 11 an Inducement 

Excuses should not serve VOU, 
chestnut plea you always make is nothing but a time worn 
fake. 

IT - singular that in trying to clear up the mystery sur- 
rounding the suicide of a despondent cigar-maker this 
week, the detectives have laid no stress on the fact that 

the unfortunate man just previous to his demise 

seen smoking one of his own cigars. As up to that moment 
he was in the best of health and spirits, subsequent events 
are transparent as crystal to the Town Crikh's mind. 

<>\Y that the holidays are o'er, 

The great Kxaiuiner will cease 
Its generous ( V) frce-ad uproar 
About the "gaunt wolf at the door;" 
And leave, unnoticed, as before, 

The poor, to starve to death in peace. 

WALTER HYDE, of Alameda, has invented a machine 
that rolls him over hourly during the stilly watches 
of the night. If Mr. Hyde would only invent something, 
now, that would roll some of San Francisco's unesteemed 
citizens over in the night, and keep them rolling, to a 
point, say, about half way between the water front and 
Goat Island, he would be canonized as a public benefactor. 

JUDGE Slack issued an order this week, compelling a 
recalcitrant husband to pay his wife six dollars per 
week for her support. Any man who has a wife capable 
of existing on six dollars weekly, and who does not appre- 
ciate the blessing, ought to be punished by taking unto 
himself one who will make six hundred fly, and then cry 
for more. 

SFTER all, there is not so much of a novelty about that 
dancing cow at a local playhouse. The Town Crier 
has seen some terpsichorean cavortings and gyrations at 
the private entertainments of some of our local "aris- 
tocracy" (Lord help us!) that would put that interesting 
and conscientious bovine quite to the blush. 

PERHAPS the easiest and best way to rid ourselves of 
Chinese cheap labor is to encourage the continuance 
of bloodshed in Chinatown until the last pigtail is laid low. 
If they kill each other off, we shall be quite relieved of re- 
sponsibility, and will be the better for their disappearance 
from our midst. 

"T,rATCH night" was generally observed according to 
Vil annual custom throughout the city on New Year's 
Eve, but the light-fingered gentry who relieve us under 
cover of darkness of our time-pieces keep "watch night" un- 
observed, according to nocturnal custom, the year round. 
Watch out for yours. 

THE Pacific Coast Women's Press Association, at its 
last meeting, discussed newspapers in all their 
phases. Probably the subject was treated from the stand- 
point of the reader. It certainly could not have been 
from that of a newspaper writer. 

BERKELEY'S arc lights have been snuffed out, but the 
intellectual lights that shed effulgence through the 
craniums of Berkeley's brain-laden faculty shine on and on 
with undimmed luster and no extra charges to tax payers. 

WHATEVER else may be said to the disparagement of 
the Farallones as a place of residence or a site for a 
grammar school, it cannot be asserted that the locality is 
insufficiently ventilated. 

CONSIDERING the fact that $10,500 is but a drop in 
the bucket of money needed to put the County Hos- 
pital into proper sanitary condition, would it not be better 
to abandon the structure at once to the bats and rats. 

WITH its street illuminations 'nightly overhead, and its 
cobbles always under foot, San Francisco may now 
justly claim the distinction of being the best-lighted and 
worst-paved city in these United States. 

BENEATH this stone lies Asa Fisk. 
He died 'cos business was not brisk. 
IT is indeed a dull day in San Francisco when a will is not 
disputed. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 




SOCIETY does not seem to have "enthused" to any 
great extent over the holidays this year, as the en- 
tertainments have been neither numerous, nor large ia 
size. To be sure, there have been theatre parties and 
small dinners, but with the exception of the Club dances, 
terpsichore has not made the showing usually looked for 
and expected during the holiday season proper. 

The Christmas Eve dance of the Fortnightly Club was 
one of the pleasantest of the winter so far. The hall had 
a very pretty Christmas dressing of evergreens, holly and 
red berries, intermingled with mistletoe, and the attend- 
ance of beaux and belles was unusually large, all entering 
into the spirit of the affair with zest. To Miss Genevive 
Goad fell the honor of leading the cotillion, which she did 
with theiassistance of a trio of young beaux of the club, 
and acquitted herself charmingly, some of the figures 
danced being both original and pretty. 

The cotillion given by Miss Jennie Moore on Christmas 
night was a brilliant gathering. The whole upper floor of 
the San Francisco Verein Club was given up to the use of 
the young hostess and her guests, the decorations of the 
ballroom being in ferns, palms and light berries. The 
gowns worn by the young ladies were remarkably hand- 
some, the young hostess, who led the cotillion with Jesse 
Triest, wearing a lovely costume of pale green satin com- 
bined with lavender. There were five figures danced, and 
the favors consisted of fans, bric-arhrac, jewelry, etc. An 
elaborate supper was served at midnight, after which 
there was general dancing until the early morning hours. 

On Saturday night Howard Adams and Miss Gertrude 
Bates led the cotillion of the Saturday Evening Club at 
Lunt's Hall. The figures were all new, as was the music 
to which they were danced, and the entire affair was a 
very pronounced success. 

Miss Jean Hush was the leader of the Leap Year cotil- 
lion of the Oakland Friday Night Club, which took place at 
Ebell Hall on New Year's Eve, the last Leap Year dance 
that will be given for eight years! 

The dinners of Mrs. Joseph Ehrman, Dr. Herzstein and 
Mrs. M. Schweitzer, the latter at the Cliff House yester- 
day, were in honor of Miss Helen Schweitzer and her 
Gancte, Samuel Steifel; Miss Olga Triest's entertainment 
was in the form of a dance. The dinner given by Mr. and 
Mrs. I. N. Walter was in celebration of the twentieth an- 
niversary of their wedding, at which were seated upwards 
of thirty of their intimate friends. Mrs. S. M. Van Wyck's 
recent tea was in compliment to Miss Jones. 

The wedding ceremony of Miss Rose Fechheimer and 
Alfred Lilienfield was performed by Rabbi Voorsanger at 
the home of the bride, on Broadway, last Tuesday after- 
noon. Miss Anna Liebenthal and Miss Edith Greenbaum 
were the bride's attendants, and the guests were limited 
to the relatives of the contracting parties, owing to the 
recent sad affliction in the bride's family. 

On Thursday Grace Church was the scene of the mar- 
riage of Miss Bessie Younger and Burns McDonald, the 
Rev. Dr. Foute tying the nuptial knot at the hour of noon, 
amid lovely floral surroundings, in which pink was the 
dominating tint, and in the presence of a very large num- 
ber of the friends of the young couple. Miss Maud Younger 
officiated as her sister's maid-ol'-honor, the Misses Lucille 
Younger, Francis Curry, Julia Crocker, Mae Tucker, and 
Kate Clarke forming a bevy of pretty bridesmaids. Duke 
Baxter supported the groom as best man, and Messrs. 
Herbert Younger, Ed. Greenway, George Cameron, 
Frank Owen, Sam Buckbee, and Dr. P. L. Brown ap- 
peared as ushers. Following the church service a wed- 
ding breakfast for the bridal party was served at the 
Palace Hotel, and the honeymoon will be spent in the 
southern part of the State. 



The marriage of Miss Helen Schweitzer and Samuel 
Steifel will be solemnized next Tuesday at noon at the 
Schweitzer residence, on Leavenworth street. The fair 
bride has selected the Misses Belle Gerstle, Cora Miller, 
Alice Greenebaum. and Agnes Brandenstein for her at- 
tendants that day, and Miss Clara Joseph will officiate as 
maid-of-honor. 

A number of engagements have been announced since 
the last issue of the News Letter, prominent among 
them being those of Miss Julia Crocker and Samuel Buck- 
bee; Miss Alice Ames and Arthur Allen; Miss Anna Hobbs 
and Lieutenant Frank Ferris. U. S. A.; Miss Mattie Ehr- 
man and Albert Frank; Miss Mattie Shainwald and Leo 
Mayers, Miss Mollie Hutchinson and Ernest Piexotto, and 
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Ralston's friends are congratulating 
tdem upon the engagement of their son, Louis Ralston, to 
Miss Louise Sumner, of Utica, New York. It was at a 
dinner given by Mrs. E. J. McCutcheon last week that the 
announcement was made of the Ames- Allen engagement, 
the understanding between the young people, while exist- 
ing for more than a year past, only now being made pub- 
lic, and the wedding will, 'tis said, be an event of the aprit 
Lenten season. 

The Concordia and the San Francisco Verein Clubs both 
gave dances on New Year's eve. Mrs. Rounseville Wild- 
man's tea was the chief society event of New Year's Day, 
and it is with regret that her friends hear of her intended 
departure for Mexico. Mrs. Wildman is so indefatigable a 
hostess she will be indeed a loss to the social world, so it 
is hoped her absence will not be a very prolonged one. 

The New Year's amusements at Burlingame this year 
combined a pigeon shoot in the morning, a steeple chase in 
the afternoon, and then another drag hunt, with finally a 
dance at the Club House in the evening. 

Among the pleasures that society has in prospect are 
the dance of the Monday Night Club at Golden Gate Hall, 
next Monday evening; the cotillion of the Friday Night 
Club, at Odd Fellows' Hall; the game of football, which 
will be played at Central Park next Saturday between the 
Army and Navy teams, and the team from the University 
Club, which promises to be a decidedly society affair; and 
the Army cotillion of the Friday Fortnightly Club, which 
will be danced on the evening of the 15th of January, at 
Lunt's Hall, Lieutenants Kilburn and Nolan dividing the 
honors as "leaders." 

January is to be a month of "at homes," many of our 
hostesses sending out cards for certain afternoons during 
the month, as, for instance, Mrs. Beede, who is residing 
with Mrs. Rounseville Wildeman, has named Tuesdays 
during January; Mrs. Smedburg, Wednesdays; Mrs. Gor- 
don Blanding, Mrs. Will Barnes, and Mrs. Webster Jones, 
Fridays during the month. 

Mrs. Frank S. Johnson, who has been at Coronado 
Beach for the last six weeks with her children, has been 
joined by Mr. Johnson, who is now spending the holidays at 
this resort. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson will open up their sum- 
mer home in San Rafael early in March. 

Miss Daisy Doud will shortly leave for the Farallones, 
where she will instruct ten little children whose homes are 
on that lonely island. Miss Doud has many friends in this 
city, all of whom will wish her success when she starts 
upon her mission. 

The ladies of Sorosis have issued instructions for next 
Monday afternoon to meet and listen to Mr. Frank Lin- 
coln, the renowned entertainer. Mrs. H. E. Huntington 
will provide the programme. 

The best way to buy anything is to borrow it 
first. 

Get a package of Schilling 's Best tea of your 
grocer. He pays you your money back if you 
don't like it. 

That's our way of lending. 



January 2, 1897. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



'7 



Dr. Younger, who came from Chicago to ottcml his 
lilinjr. will leave again on his return 
,day afternoon, and it will be some time n 
Francisco sees him again. Mrs. Younger will remain here 
a few weeks longer ere she joins her husband in the Windy 
City, and later the entire family will sail for K 
where the marriage of Miss Alice Younger and Baron 
it will take place at Vienna, in June. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jim Rolinson anticipate a trip to Europe, leaving here 
early in February; Douglas Dick is now in Scotland, 
whither he has gone on a brief business trip. 

A farewell pink luncheon was given to Mrs. John J, 
Husband by her sister. Mrs. Dr. Byron, Haines at the 
beautiful Haines residence in Belvedere on Wednesday 
Mr. and Mrs. Husband leave this week for London 
in which city they will make their home. At the dinner 
fouiteen covers were set. among those present being. 
Miss Oosgrove, Miss Patricia Cosgrove, Miss Charlotte 
Cunningham. Miss May Reis, Miss Lillie Reis, .Miss 
Kathrvn Dillon, Miss Vesta Jordan, Mrs. H. L. Read, 
Mrs. James Russell, and Mrs. Frank Dickson. 

The beautiful and imposing ceremonies 3t the late Kate 
Field's funeral will long be remembered by all those who 
witnessed them. To Mrs. Highton is due the credit for 
the artistic and perfect manner in which the ceremonies 
were conducted. She instigated the good work and saw 
that it was carried through to a successful conclusion. 
Not only this State, for whom she acted, but the journalists 
of the world are indebted to her. She has proved herself 
to be a loyal friend, indeed, to the departed. 

Miss Maud Ingles Francis, who has been studying in 
Paris and Dresden for the last five years, returned to this 
Coast to assist as bridesmaid at the wedding of Miss Cora 
Goodrich of Los Angeles. Miss Francis is a sister-in-law to 
J. Schroeder by marriage and is now a guest of her 
brother-in-law and his wife at the California Hotel. In 
three or four weeks Miss Francis expects to return to her 
home in Peoria, 111. 

Clarence Eddy, the famous organist who lately visited 
this city, was entertained at a dinner party on Saturday 
evening last given by Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Mills at their 
residence, 2800 Jackson street. After the dinner Mr. 
Eddy attended the High and Low Jinks given at the 
Bohemian Club and left for the East on the following 
morning. 

Mrs. Julia Melville Snyder, the well known teacher of 
vocal music, has moved her studio to 2517} California 
street between Steiner and Pierce streets. Few of our 
teachers are so universally liked as is Mrs. Snyder. Her 
method of teaching dramatic elocution is most thorough 
and many of her pupils now occupy prominent positions on 
the stage. 

The members of Ignatian Council No. 35 Young Men's 
Institute are perfecting arrangements for their annual 
party to be held on Friday evening, January 22nd, at 
N. S. G. W. Hall. This event promises to eclipse all 
former affairs given under this Council's auspices. 

Mrs. J. W. Coleman and Miss Jessie, Miss Florence Ives, 
Mrs. James Phelan, Mrs. Frank Sullivan, and Miss Ada 
are all at home again after long absences in the East and 
elsewhere. 

Captain and Mrs. W. A. Nevills have been spending the 
holiday season in town, and are domiciled at their apart- 
ments in the Palace Hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Verdenal have been visiting their 
daughter, the wife of Colonel Forsyth of Fresno, during 
the holidays. 

The second of the Ehrman-Frank engagement recep- 
tions will be held at the Hotel Richelieu to-morrow. 

The Union League Club will give a ladies' reception on 
Friday evening next, the 8th of January. 



"He called me dear." " That doesn't prove anything. 
Gas is dear." — Washington Capital. 



Max Abraham, the Caterer, 428 Geary street, has had his hands 
full daring the holiday season. Mr. Abraham attends to banquets, 
dinners or luncheons and by retaining him you can be assured of 
satisfaction in every detail. He is patronized by all society and is 
recognized as the Prince of Caterers. 




AFTER THE SPIN JSm' 

Famous for 50 Years. f? m ^ 

Preserves the Teeth. 1/iar/l/jKnM*' 
Cleanses the Mouth f^%VX%/Ui/i(l 

Sweetens the Breath. My r- ■ i minimi ^ 
A sample by mail for the ^^Pure and Harmless 

EistJiEe (3 ceii Is I ir you mention tills publication. Address 
ALL A: RUCKEL, Proprietors of Sozodont, New York. 



REMOVAL, 



* MAGONDRAY X GO. 

Importers Teas, Mattings and Silks. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 

Agents North China Insurance Company {Limited), 

Have removed to 

116 California Street, San Francisco, Gal. 



TH6 N6W 
Grown Violet 



The Latest and Finest 



Violet 



A Charming Gift Perfume. 




Distilled from, the natural flowers of the 
Mviira. No chemicals used. 'THE 
FINEST VIOLET MADE, and the suc- 
cess of the day in. London, and. Paris. 
Price, in a beautiful carton, $1.25 per bottle. 

For sale by Caswell, Massey& Co., New 
York; Melvin & Badger, or T Metcalf 
Co , Boston; George B. Evans, Phila. ; 
Wilmot J Hall & Co., Cincinnati; Le- 
land Miller, St. Louis; The Auditor- 
ium Pharmacy Co , Auditorium BMd'g, 
Chicago; W. C. Scupham, Chicago: The 
OwlDrugCo., S. P. and Los Angeles; 
The Scholtz Drug Co.. Denver, and All 
Leadjng Dealers in Perfumery. 

Ask your druggist for the Crown Violet. 

CROWN PERFUMERY CO., LONDON. 

Makers of the universal favorites, Crab-apple Blossoms and Matsu- 
kita Perfumes, and the Crown Lavender Salts asked for all over the 
world. 





i8 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 



TWO A. M. IN A BRO WNSTONE. 

By Felix Montague. 

mWO o'clock! 
The deep toll of tbe city clock startles the black 
silence that hangs over the city like a pall. The 
-*- muffled cathedral chime, as it reverberates through 
the hallway, sounds like the hollow sepulchral voice of 
death. Black shadows flit nervously over the mosaic floor. 
The dim light flares up for a moment; then gloom and quiet. 
Silence as profound as death. 

A heavy silken portiere quivers, moves. Two dark 
glistening eyes peer up and down the hall. Softry the 
dark object steals from behind the portiere, and, with tread 
as still as murder itself, passes under the dim light at the 
foot of the stairs. There, pausing, listening, it breathlessly 
peers up the gloomy stairway. 
The intruder mounts the first step, listens. Takes the 



second, listens again, then the third and fourth, and, grow- 
ing bolder, climbs stealthily to the top of the flight. Not 
a sound. Peering through the darkness, the noiseless vis- 
itor glides cautiously to a door, a door at the end of the 
corridor. The door is ajar, and the deep regular breath- 
ing of the sleeper ma} - be heard. The dark object is now 
in the moon-lit room. All is quiet save the regular breath- 
ing. Then comes a grating sound from the room. The 
breathing ceases. The bed springs squeak. The grating 
sound is quiet. The silence is intense. 

Suddenly a sharp report, a shattering of glass, a curse. 
A white-robed figure rushes madly across the corridor 
after the dark object. A missile is hurled at the intruder 
racing down the stairs. It misses, and thumps and bumps 
against the bannisters. Doors in the upper corridor fly 
open. Voices cry: " What's the matter ? " The white- 
robed figure answers: " Oh! a rat, and I've broken a mir- 
ror. D — n!'' 



OUR NEW YEAR'S GIFTS. 

NEW Year's gifts, New Year's gifts, 
Please come, all attend, 
The News Lettee proffers its New Year's 
gifts 
To every faithful friend. 

For Wally Hobart a little dog, 

And a little huntsman, too, 
With a little voice and a little horn 

To wind a view— halloo. 

For Mayor Phelan a little whip 

With a lash with a little sting, 
To lay it on when occasion calls, 

And scourge the cunning ring. 

To Frank McCoppin, whom all men like 
Because he's honest and square, 

Some better luck with a bob-tailed Hush, 
And success when he draws to a pair. 

To Charlie Josselyn so debonair. 

Who dresses in excellent taste, 
A chance to the club with joy declare, 

" By the Lord, I have found my waist." 

To Billy Barton, the exile, back 
From the frozen and stormy East, 

Some sort of fabric to hide from men 
The sight of his Bowery vest. 

To I >ouald Graham, whose neckwear doth 
With the rainbow's tinting vie, 

A something to dazzle in color and glare 
The latest London tie. 

To Porter Ashe a little book, 

Which circulates on the sly, 
And tbe title upon this little work 

Is simply: " The Art to Guy." 

To Lansing Mizner, fat, honest boy. 

Who knows not deceit or guile, 
A gift to make life more complete, 

A well-worn property smile. 

To Mayor Sutro a picture wild 

As a maniac's wildest dream, 
Of purposes smashed and intentions foiled, 

And its title: " What Might Have Been." 

To Harry Dimond a carpet fine, 

A rare Oriental mat. 
To replace in cunning and high design 

The one that was spoiled in " The Flat." 

To Charley Baldwin the needed knack 

Of how to handle the reins, 
To Follansbee a better hat 

Than the one he wears on the plains. 

To Jere Lynch a little book, 

Familiar to little folk, 
And of use to all; whose title is, 

" Good French as She is Spoke." 

To Sammy Rainey a brief request : 
" Since you own us, Sammy dear, 

Go light, go light, the times are tight, 
Don't squeeze us too hard this year." 



To Jimmy Hamilton, actors' friend, 

Of Napoleonic mold. 
The Thespian ribbon, the Lodi cross, 

And the fleur-de-lis in gold. 

To Peter Donahue, rosy and young, 
Whose complexion never pales, 

A nice medalion, on ivory done. 
Of his friend the Prince of Wales. 

To James M. Thompson, the bold cashier. 

Mill Valley's cowboy king, 
A pistol whose ring is true and clear, 

And a Bowie that hath a sting. 



And more than we enumerate, 

Gifts to the kind and true; 
With warm hands and hearts elate, 

Our friends we give to you ; 

We give, and wish you all God-speed 
Throughout the coming year, 

To cull the rose and shun the weed 
While will mirth o'er masters care. 

The clouds are speeding from the sky, 
And, rising calm and clear, 

We see and hail prosperity 
To mark the glad New Year. 




Jam: 



FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTER. 



61 












.THE IOLO FLAG — » c. HNMSt, w so- 

FK with your bat as toe Bag goo- t.y I 

And let the beart have it 
You're man enouub for a tear in your eye 

That you will not wipe away , 

You're man enough for a thrill that goes 
To your very liuger-tips— 

the lump just then in your throat that rose 
Bpoke more than your parted lips. 

Lift up the boy on your shoulder, high. 

And show him the faded shred— 
Those stripes would be red as the sunset sky 

If I>eath could have dyed them red. 

The.'man that bore it with Death has lain 
These twenty years andtmore; — 

He died that the work should not be vain 
Of tbe men who bore it before. 

The man that bears it is bent and old, 
And ragged his beard and gray,— 

But look at his eye tire young and bold, 
At the tune that he hears them play. 

The old tune thunders through all the air, 
And strikes right in to tbe beart :— 

If ever it calls. for you. boy, be there! 
Be there, and ready to start. 

Off with your hat as the flag goes by ! 

Uncover the youngster's head ! 
Teach him to hold it holy and high, 

For the sake of its^sacred dead. 



MY LITTLE GIRL.— Samuel mintudn peck, in times-democrat' 

My little girl is nested 

Within her tiny bed, 
With amber ringlets crested 

Around her dainty head; 
She lies so calm and stilly, 

She breathes so soft and low, 
She calls to mind a lily 

Half hidden in the snow. 

A weary little mortal 

Has gone to slumberland; 
The Pixies at the portal 

Have caught her by the hand: 
She dreams her broken dolly 

Will soon be mended there, 
That looks so melancholy 

Upon the rocking-chair. 

I kiss your wayward tresses, 

My drowsy little queen ; 
I know you have caresses 

From floating forms unseen; 
O angels, let me keep her 

To kiss away my cares, 
This darling little sleeper 

Who has my love and prayers. 



WHEN GRAN'MA WAS THARE.--*™*™ constitution. 

The old house seemed to brighten with a peaceful, lovin' light 
A-drivin' out the shadders t' the bosom o' the night; -^i _^ 
The look o' calm contentment on her face, so soft 'n fair,; 
• Made ever'thing 'pear better— when gran'ma was thare.} 

The beams ud come a-creepin' through the mornin' glory vine, 
'N' golden rays o 7 sunshine about her head 'ud twine, 
Tell they made a perfec' halo with the silver in her hair, 
A-dancin' 'n' a-bethin' — when gran'ma was thare. 

Ever'thing got quiet, with a kind o' pure delight, 
'N ' put us all to smilin' when her face come in sight ; 
Thare 'ud be a lovin' quiver in the little rockin' chair, 
Jes' like it was happy, too— when gran'ma was thare. 

'N' now the little churchyard holds a saddened charm for me, 
I never go a-near it but I pause beneath a tree, 
Whose boughs 're alius sighin', with the faintest breath o' air, 
A-sorrowin' 'n' a-sayin' that — gran'ma is thare. 



• Macbeth " means tough- 

. when applied to 

lamp-chimneys ; perfection <>f 

. besides, if \ < »u get the 

Number made for your lamp. 

Let us send you the index. 

Geo A Macbeth Co 

I'm.t.urgh Pa 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER 'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Ladies' Grill Room, Palace Hotel. Direct entrance from Market streot. 
Open until midnight. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 333-334 Pine street. Rooms for 

ladies and families, private entrance. John Bergez, Proprietor. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rotisserle, HI O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantinl, Proprietor. 
Nevada Restaurant, 417 Pino St. Private rooms ; meals 50c. Loupy BROS 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B. Brun. 

DENTISTS. 

Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southwest cor. Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. M. Consultation Hours : 4 to 5. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

MEDICAL. 
A Sovereign Remedy. DR. PARKER'S COUGH CURE One dose will 
stop a cough. It never fails. Try it. Price 35c, George Dahlbender& Co., 
214 Kearny street. 

Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St., near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections onapproval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorpor ated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

PRINTING AND RUBBER STAMPS. 
Koch & Harney, (Jas. H.Harney, Geo. T. Koch), Job Printers, 648 Sacra- 
mento St. Fine printing and embossing, seals, rubber stamps, stenoils, etc. 
_____ 

Latest English Pear Drops. Roberts', Polk and Bush. 

VEHICLES 
Latest style Victoria, only used a few times; also, three-seated drag, 
500 Golden Gate Avenue. 



Gray Bros., 



316 Montgomery Street, S. P. 

No. 205 New High St., Los ADgeles. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and 
Manufacturer of 



Artificial Stone 

Schillinger's Patent ] In all its branches 

Side Walk and Garden Walk a specialty." 

Office: 307 Montgomery street, (Nevada block) San FranoiBCo 



WINDOW SHADES 
PAPER HANGING 
TINTING or 
FRESCOING. 



Jas. Deify & Go., 

20 GEARY ST. 

Estimates cheerfully given. 
Telephone Grant 39. 



MORRIS & KENNEDY'S ART GALLERY 

19 and 21 POST ST., San Francisco. 
New and Elegant 

PAINTINGS, PICTURES, and FRAMES 

w - — flt Greatly, Reduced Prices. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897 



In response to many inquiries from 
all parts of the country about the 
Railway and Dock Construction 
Company 



The officials hereby give full infor- 
mation in regard to the company, 
its business and prospects. 



The company offers 20,000 shares of stock for sale in lots to suit 
purchasers at $20 per share. The par value is $100 per share— full 
paid and unassessable— stockholders have no individual liability 
whatever. The company has no indebtedness of any kind— is in 
solid financial condition— and, as there are no bonds nor mortgages, 
all the earnings go to the stockholders. 

The adoption of this Company's system of construction by the 
United States Government, or any Foreign Government, or by any 
one of the large cities in America or Europe will cause the stock to 
rise above par ($100) immediately. 

The most conservative investors, old shrewd bear operators on the 
stock exchange, have bought this stock and confidently predict it is 
sure to pay large dividends and sell at over $200 a share as the Kail 
way and bock Construction Co. commence business under much 
more favorable conditions than did the Bell Telephone Co., whose 
stock rose from about $10 to over 200; or the original Edison Electric 
Co., whose stock rose from 40 to $3000 a share, or the many other 
companies owning useful inventions whose stocks rose rapidly in 
value while paying large dividends to the alert original investors. 

Many prominent men in banking, railway and financial circles 
and other expert judges of stock values predict that this stock will 
pay large dividends aud will sell at over $200 per share for the 
following reasons: 

The Railway and Dock Construction Company controls all the 
rights, titles, patents and interests in and the sole, absolute and ex- 
clusive right to manufacture and sell the new indestructible piles 
that do away altogether with the millions of wooden piles heretofore 
used everywhere, which only last a short time, as alternate moisture 
and drying and the marine worms soon destroy the wood, and leave 
a deceptive shell, incapable to sustain a load that requires the full 
strength of the original pile. Old wooden piles must be continually 
replaced at great expense. 

Nothing can compete with the indestructible Pile in the construc- 
tion of piers, docks, bulkheads, sea-walls, foundations for bridges, 
lighthouses, jetties, breakwaters or other improvements in rivers, 
harbors or on the sea coast. 

This pile is an absolute necessity in railway trestlework, as it 
guarantees safety, and it will last forever, and there is an enormous 
demand for it. 

One defective wooden pile derailing a train causes a loss of many 
thousands of dollars in lives and property destroyed. 

Applications are pouring in from engineers, contractors and rail- 
way officials all over the United States. These men are quick to see 
the certainty of profit. They are perhaps better able to judge than 
others, because, out of a total of 1891 railroads, 373 of these railway 
companies are now preparing to build 20,547 miles of new line. The 
great superiority of the Railway and Dock Construction Company's 
system of solid, substantial, indestructible trestle work is causing 
the demand in this special field. 

Estimated earnings from this one source of profit will pay $7 per 
share annual dividends— this is equal to 35 per cent, cash dividends 
per year on stock bought now at present price of $20 per share. 

Other and larger sources of profit will come from contracts now in 
view, viz:— 

In place of the old wooden docks, covered by temporary sheds, 
which now disfigure the water fronts of our cities, this company will 
build solid, indestructible piers, on which permanent iron, stone or 
brick buildings are put up just the same as on land. 

Private owners of dock property as well as dock officials in the 
numerous cities are becoming aware of the great advantage of using 
the Railway and Dock Construction Company's system of building 
indestructible piers to make a solid foundation, upon which large 
buildings can be erected, from which they can get big revenues for 
rentals, etc. 

$27,000,000 have already been expended in improving Southern 
harbors and their approaches. 

In projects now under way over fifty million dollars will be 
in improving navigation in rivers, bays, etc., throughout the coun- 



try on jetties, breakwaters, and other work in which the indestructi- 
ble Pile is a great necessity. 

The city of New York is spending $5,000,000 a year improving the 
city water front. 

In a private conversation Hon. J, Sergeant Cram, ex-President of 
the Board of Dock Commissioners said: "There is an immense 
fortune in this company's system of construction." 

The U. S. Senate Committee have recommended the expenditure 
of eighty million dollars for the protection of ourseacoast. About 
ten millions a year will be spent during the next eight years. 

The United States Government spent about $10,000,000 in deepen- 
ing the entrance of the Mississippi to divert tidal action by old style 
work, which will be supplanted in future by the Railway and Dock 
Construction Company's system. $0,000,000 has already been ex- 
pended on the two immense jetties m the bay at Galveston: they 
are simply loose rock dumped into the water. Each jetty is about 
4J^ miles long and forms a continuous pyramid 100 feet wide at the 
bottom, tapering to 15 feet wide at the top above the water. The 
Railway and 7 Dock Construction Company build indestructible 
jetties of the same size at the bottom as the top and save this enor- 
mous waste of stone and labor. 

The "St. Louis Critic" strongly advocates the adoption of this com- 
pany's system of indestructible jetties to deepen the Mississippi at 
St. Louis. 

To provide additional funds to execute some of this work, the 
company offers 20,000 shares to the public in lots to suit at the 
low price of $20.00 per share in order to have the stock quickly 
taken. There are no salaried officials. The money derived from the 
sale of stock, when not used in profitable construction work, remains 
in the company's treasury. 

Many leading marine engineers and experts say: "This com- 
pany's system of construction is coming into universal use in build- 
ing all improvements in rivers and harbors." 

As the business in sight is too large for this company to handle 
alone, the subsidiary companies now being organized in the 
principal States each pay a certain amount in cash and one-third 
of theircapital stock into the Railway and Dock Construction Co.'s 
treasury. In addition to large sums in cash the company will re- 
ceive about $20,000,000 in securities in this way, on which dividends 
will be paid from the earnings of the subsidiary companies. These 
dividends all go to the holders of Railway an i Dock Construction 
stock. 

With a^large surplus and an ample cash working capital the com- 
pany will hold assets of $200 per share for each share now offered at 
$20 when all details are completed. 

Application will be made to list the shares on the stock exchange. 

Owing to the financial depression and uncertainty before the elec- 
tion the Railway and Dock Construction Company would not accept 
numerous contracts for work amounting to about three millions of 
dollars. They were offered first mortgage bonds in payment but the 
bonds could not be sold at that time in New York or London at 
satisfactory prices. English bankers are now negotiating to p 1 ---** a 
large block of Railway and Dock Construction stock and apply 
for an official quotation on the London Stock Exchange. 

The officials and large stockholders are well-known practical 
financiers and business men, whose names are at once a synonym for 
trustworthy, capable management and a guarantee that any stock 
in which they invest is safe, solid and profitable. Among them are 

Among the stockholders are: 

Geo. W. Dunn, Esq., president of the company, head of the bank- 
ing house of George W. Dunn & Co., New York, and president, 
director and trustee of other corporations ; he has been prominent in 
Wall Street for 20 years as a careful level-headed financier ; Hon. 
Thomas Murphy, vice-president, ex-Senator, Collector of the port of 
New York under President U. S. Grant; R. A. B. Dayton, Esq., 
counsel for thecompany, Temple Court, New York; Eugene Harvey, 
Esq., second vice-president, banker, Drexel building, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; R. M. Stanbrough, Esq., Kingston, N. \\; George D. Hilyard, 
Esq., contractor, N. Y.; W. R. Childs, Esq., of the Calumet and 
Hecla Copper Company, Calumet, Mich. ; Edward A. Wilson, Esq., 
secretary; M. Hotf. assistant secretary ; George B. Shelhorn, Esq.. 
receiver, Montgomery. Tuscaloosa and Memphis Railway Co., 
Montgomery, Ala; Y. Carry er. Esq., of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company, Field, B. C, Canada; Howard Swineford, Esq., of 
Howard Swineford & Co. Richmond, Va.; Jacob Deyo, cashier, 
Huguenot Bank, New Paltz.N. Y. ; S. J, Gifibrd, Dunkirk, N. Y.. 
and several rich and influential railway and political magnates who 
will have seats in the Board of Directors later on. 

Address all applications for stock and remit for the number of 
shares wanted to the Financial Agents of the company, Messrs, 



GEO. W. DUNN & CO., 



2 Wall St.. 



New York. 



by check, draft, money order, registered letter or by express; or 
have the stock sent by express C O. D. 

The right is reserved to reject any application for stock. and to 
allot only a part of the shares applied for, and to advance the price 
without notice. 



Jam: 



PR VNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



-lOW WE MISSED OUR 

CHRISTMAS DINNER. \ 

By dohn P. Albro. ]■ 

■ 

PROBABLY no jiortion of the wide-spreading Rocky 
Mountain- be Bitter Hoot Range, which 

stretches along tin- Northern boundary of Idaho nearly to 
the Yellowstone Park, In inaccessibility and the wild 
grandeur of its scenery. Snows, almost eternal, cap its 
lofty summit.- and linger In Its shady narrow gorges long 
after the surrounding country bathes in summer heat. 
. picturesque though difficult region for railroading 
but, notwithstanding the expense and labor, necessity has 
compelled more than one transcontinental line to brave its 
perilous passes. I had been miuing, with my partner 
Howard Mindou, all the summer of 189— on the western 
slope of one of these passes. We had been moderately 
successful. Christmas was approaching and the cold and 
snow had begun to interfere with the season's work. Not 
only that, but a natural longing to spend the holidays at 
home with friends induced us to shut down our little mill 
and seek a more congenial climate. We were delayed in 
starting and as the passenger train ran only once a day 
and was reported indefinitely late on account of storms, 
we decided to take the freight train which passed our 
little station eastward bound in the evening. Packing up 
our little store of accumulated wealth, we boarded the 
caboose of a lumber train. The train was made up, be- 
sides the caboose, of twelve cars heavily loaded with 
lumber from Puget Sound, drawn by a huge Mogul engine 
much in vogue on those difficult grades. We were soon in 
the mountains happy to have a respite from our rough 
toil and in the anticipation of Christmas joy which we 
knew awaited us. The train toiled painfully up to the 
crest of the grade. Better time might be expected and 
in that we were not disappointed. We had barely 
traveled a mile when the speed attained attracted our at- 
tention as well as that of the conductor and rear brake- 
man, our only company. Soon the flying rocks and trees, 
and the swaying of the car showed that the sober limit of 
freight train travel was being far exceeded. The con- 
ductor showed uneasiness and got up, staggered his way 
to the door and opened it just as through the crisp air 
came a wild screech from the engine for brakes. The 
engine could not hold the train. We were all aroused to the 
situation in an instant. The conductor sprang to the 
front brake and twisted the wheel in desperation. 
Howard and I together reached the rear platform and 
put our combined strength to the task of setting the 
brake there, while the brakeman climbed the lumber cars 
in front, jumping from one to the other as fast as he could 
turn the brakes. We were now going at an incredible 
speed. The wind of our movement rushed through the 
open doors so fiercely as to nearly sweep us from our feet. 
The cars in the long train were weaving from side to side 
as they struck the sharp curves and the light caboose at 
the end rocked with a violence that threatened to throw 
it from the tracks at any moment. The train was so far 
beyond control that the brakes had no apparent effect, 
for the wheels slid along the glistening rails as though 
they were ice and our train a brand new bob sled. The 
conductor had gone forward to help the brakemen, and 
Mindou and I, our usefulness at an end, climbed into the 
little lookout on the roof to watch w_hat was going on 
ahead. The sight was not one to encourage dreams of 
Christmas pleasures. The great mass of the runaway 
train was thundering down one of the most perilous in- 
clines known in the Rockies. The descent itself was but a 
part of the danger. One must imagine the abrupt curves 
round which the flying monster rushed with half the 
wheels apparently in the air, the jagged rocks which 
lined the route ready to make kindling wood of any car 
that left the track, and the yawning ravines, a hundred 
feet in depth or more, open mouthed to receive us, in 
order to appreciate our situation. We had run five miles 
from the summit and knew that Devil's Gulch was just 
ahead. Could we pass it in safety? Around the project- 
ing point ahead it lay, and we gripped each other's hands 
and set our teeth to await the awful issue. Our eyes 



ted upon the engine, it jhot ., round the curve 
and struck the straight track over the gulch I: 
like a ship in a storm it still he! ,\\i Car 

after ear followed suit, until the middle of the trait 
ed. On the sixth car the rear brakeman 

straining at the wheel The pace was ton much. The 

oar and the one behind it shot out from the outre and 

plunged down the terrible abyss. We closed em 
expecting to go the same road in our turn. We beard the 
despairing yell of the brakeman and the dull thud of 
shivered ears against the rocks below wli>. I 
his awful fate. The coupling hail broken and 
we were still on the track. The gulch was passed but 
equal dangers lay ahead, magnified by the fact that our 
train was now in two wildly careening sections. We saw 
the fireman wave his hands in warning to us to save our- 
selves, and saw him jump into a mass of snow and rocks, 
against the mouutain side. The head brakeman quickly 
followed his example. We saw them lie stunned and help- 
less as we thundered past, and learned afterward that they 
escaped alive but both sadly crippled. Car after car 
from our decimated train fell by the wayside until only 
two remained ahead of the caboose on our section, and 
only one was still with the engine. The conductor had 
scrambled back to the caboose. We held a hurried con- 
sultation and decided to stick to the car. Fifteen awful 
minutes passed in similar suspense; minutes, anyone of 
which might be our last. At the end of that time we had 
reached the plain and the long level track ahead aroused 
a hope of safety. The speed was slackening noticeably, 
but a rod on the engine had broken loose and was piercing 
the boiler at ever turn of the drivers. It was suddenly 
jolted from the track a few hundred yards ahead of us and 
lay with its nose in a ditch in a cloud of escaping steam, 
and we were at last brought to a halt by crashing into it. 
Beyond a few bruises we found ourselves unhurt, but the 
engineer, brave and faithful to the last like so many of his 
calling, was found scalded to death by the escaping steam. 
Mindou and I ate our Christmas turkey on New Year's 
day that year, with many a sigh for our less fortunate 
conpanions, thankful for our lives, determined that hence- 
forward passenger trains would be good enough accom- 
modation for us. 

No finer stock of Jewelry and Silverware was ever exhibited in this 
city than A. Hirschman, No. 10 Post street, (Masonic Temple) has 
on exhibition, and bis prices are most reasonable. 

A delicious luncheon is served for ladies at the Maison Eiche 
during shopping hours. 





™« HER6ULES 



GAS, GASOLINE, and 
OIL ENGINES. 
Best to buy and cheapest to operate for Mining, 
Milling, Pumping, Hoisting, and all Stationary 
and Marine Work. All sizes and styles from 1 to 
200 horse power. 

3000 inuse. Catalogue free. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed or money refunded. 

HERCULES GAS ENGINE WORKS, 

Office: 405-407 Sansome street, S. P. 



SAX PRANCISCO NEWS U-TTRR. 



January 2, 1897 




To Physicians and the Public : 



E\ ERYONE ia our 
city seems to have 
had a joyous Christmas; even the poor were more gener- 
ously remembered than ever before, and society — well, 
society always has a good time. The girls had heaps of 
pretty presents and the men enough ties and handker- 
chiefs to last indefinitely. There are whispers of several 
new engagements to be announced at the opening of the 
New Year. One of two sisters and two brothers will not 
very much astonish society, as things have been pointing 
that way for some time past. 

* * * 

How many of us will start in the New Year with in- 
numerable good desires, good resolves, and good inten- 
tions, and alas ! how many will have built their hopes on 
sand and their string of good intentions turn to be a mere 
thread broken by the first pull at it ! A few pretty buds 
have confided their set purpose to us, and they are so 
earnest, too. Miss Helen Wagner is going to be as good 
as good can be, going to church every Sunday, and joining 
some charitable society to help the deserving poor. Miss 
Clemmie Kip is going to give up theatre parties; Miss 
Mary Kip to abjure making conquests; Miss Caro Crockett 
is going to give half her pocket money to the poor; Miss 
Helen Hopkins will do without one pair of gloves a month 
from her allowance, and devote the same to some worthy 
charity; Miss Kate Salisbury will knit a pair of wristlets 
for some deserving old man; Miss May Belle G win will stop 
breaking hearts; Miss Ethel Cohen will not be so general 
in her fascinations, but settle on one; Miss Gertie Foreman 
will study the map of South Africa; Miss Cora Smedburg 
will not pout once during the year; Miss Marie Zane will 
find a key to her affections. These are a few; more later 
on, when the girls announce themselves. 

* * * 

The news that Dr. Harry Tevis meditates making 
Bakersfield his future home has created quite a ripple of 
disturbance among his fair friends in the city, for who is 
a more popular member of society than the handsome 
young doctor? However, the profession which he has 
chosen is overstocked in the city, and they say he is ambi- 
tious of doing good work in it, so will devote his profes- 
sional labors to the rural districts and enjoy the social side 
of life at his brother Will's. Mrs. Will Tevis is very fond of 
large house parties, and our prettiest belles never refuse 
an invitation to make one of the bidden thereto. 

* * * 

Gay doings arc still the order of the day at the snug 
Hotel Rafael. The climate of San Rafael is anything but 
wintry, and many of our leading society folk appear to 
appreciate the fact as they are still to be found there. 
Manager Warfield makes the comfort of each guest his 
own business, and that all are well looked after goes with- 
out saying. New Year's Day was celebrated in good old- 
fashioned manner by the guests there assembled. 

* * * 

The B'lingham " hunt" was not the success hoped for 
by the habituts of that swagger settlement. Possibly, the 
holiday ties of town, the unsettled state of the weather, 
and the newness of the thing may, in a measure, account 
for this, and people say that the next affair of the kind 
will be a howling success. Qui vivra terra. 

* * # 

It is considered a coincidence by the society girls that 
two of their number — Miss Julia Crocker and Miss Alice 
Ames— should have signalized their return from European 
travel by a resolve to settle down in the quiet path of 

domestic life. 

* # # 

Little Lady Hesketh — Flo 1 Sharon — seems to have set- 
tled down into English country life, her absorbing pastime 
being hunting. California^ friends who have been in her 
vicinity say her old home and its associations have quite 
lost all charm for her. 




In Cases of 1 Dozen Bottles. 



Ot perfect and reliable purity, uncqualeil for MEDICINAL and TABLE 

use, and gdahantkkd by shippers. This wine is invaluable 

as a restorative for the invalid. 



For sulr by all the Leading Dealers and Grocers 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
s<»lc Age 



314 Sacramento St. 




Going out of 
Business. 

Commencing flonday, Jan. 4th 

^^$125,000 

CLOAKS, 
SUITS, etc. 

The entire slock to be sold during next 30 
days at a TREMENDOUS SACRIFICE 

ARriAND CAILLEAU, 

Cor. Geary St. and Grant Ave. 



Gomel) Oolono. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 

20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 

i 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Bullion Mining Co. 

The regular annual meeting or the stockholders or the Bullion Mining 
Company will be held at the c^ee of me company, room 11, 831 Pin<- 
I street, San Francisco, on 

THURSDAY, the HTB DAY OF JANTTARY, 1897, 
at 1 ho hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board ofDircc- 
I tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other bust- 
DesB as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Tues- 
I day, the I'Jth day of January, 189? at iSCo'olocli M 

R R CRAVSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 11, 331 Pine street, S. F.,Cal 

Mining Machinery 

and SUPPLIES 

THE ROPP STRAIGHT LINE FURNACE. 
HUNTINGTON CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER MILL. 
ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS. 
WOOD-WORKING AND IRON-WORKING MACHINERY. 

PARKE, LACY & CO., 

21 and 23 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 



Jam 



SAX FRANCIJ \VS LETTER. 










-■ /"MIUISTMAS almost 111x111 us ami the 
\^/ irround white enough with snow to sat- 
■ en the most gloomy dreaders of a jrreeo Christmas, 
very beautiful and most inconvenient. One can 
t about and for all excepting the favored few 
who dwell in the midst of things, the shops display in vain 
their tempting wares. There is nothing very new in 
Christmas decoration this year, uor in holiday gifts; but 
where so much is beautiful there is no necessity for any- 
thing new. But year by year the drain upon one's pocket- 
book becomes more and more severe for the veriest trifles 
are of an extravagance in price appalling to think of. In 
accordance with the sentiment that Christmas means a 
competitive race in lavish if not reckless expenditure, the 
fashion of flower-giving is at its height, and as nothing 
soars higher in price than orchids and violets, these are 
• the choice. They may not be sent, as of 
old, in a simple card board box, but must be enclosed in a 
gorgeously painted case, fastened with yards of broad rib- 
bon, or else sent in crystal or porcelain vases, whose ap- 
pearance will at once indicate their foreign manufacture. 
Thus are all save the rich excluded from the pretty cus- 
tom of flower sending. In bon-bons it is the same; but he 
whose purse will allow him to echo his heart's sentiment 
with the jingle of coin may express his Christmas hopes in 
"sweets to the sweet." 

The bicycle shines forth more radiantly than ever, and 
there are special departments in all the stores for the sale 
of everything that can in any sense be associated with the 
royal master of the road. A sensation has been caused by 
the engagement in a big shop of Choynski. the Californian 
pugilist, as the manager of the "athletic goods depart- 
ment," and one paper humorously suggests the possibility 
of his giving lessons in knock-down blows to all exasper- 
ating or tiresome purchasers. The suggestion is pictur- 
esque. 

We have had a true social sensation this week in the 
raid made by Captain Chapman, of the "Tenderloin Pre- 
cinct," upon Sherry's, the exclusive and fashionable restau- 
rant in Fifth Avenue, where many not of the Four Hun- 
dred, but of the still more conservative One Hundred and 
Fifty, are wont to gather. The occasion was a dinner 
given by Herbert Seeley, grandson of the late P. T. 
Barnum, to his brother, who is soon to marry. As is very 
often the case nowadays, the dinner guests were diverted 
by a vaudeville show — skirt dancing, banjo-playing and that 
sort of thing during the evening. An agent from whom 
the talent was not engaged announced to the Police Cap- 
tain during the afternoon that an indecent entertainment 
was arranged, and that his own daughter had indignantly 
and with tears told him that she had been asked to dance 
in the altogether. This is the Captain's explanation why 
he burst in upon a peaceful dinner party when alsoiutely 
nothing improper was taking place, and where his arrival 
was naturally resented. Result — a cataclysm in society 
and threats of all sorts of revenge from the Gallic Sherry. 

An amusing afterpiece to this tempest has been played 
in New Rochelle, where the members of the New Rochelle 
Yacht Club gave a smoker, with vaudeville, a few nights 
ago. Lena Routt, one of the dancers at Mr. Seeley's din- 
ner, was a dancer at the smoker, and since the raid all the 
wives and sweethearts of the New Rochelle yachtsmen 
have made life agreeable for their present and future 
lords, and I am told that one man has gone so far as to 
make out an affidavit before a notary that the smoker was 
respectable. This, it is stated, he intends as a Christmas 
gift for his wife. And, by the way, I heard only this morn- 
ing of an odd Christmas gift which the wife and daughter 
of a wealthv Harlem merchant are making to the head of 
their family. It is, a pledge not to drink for one year, 
signed by the mother, and a similar pledge for six months, 
signed by the daughter; neither of the women is addicted 
to drink, but both admit that they find abstinence difficult. 

Society is in its very whirl at present. There was a 
pretty wedding yesterday, when Miss Duncan, a grand- 
niece of John C. Calhoun and a niece of Mr. Thomas Addis 



• Dr Effio 

m York i 
Idine breakfast, limited to relatlvi 

in intimate friend of the 
family, played the wedding n 

Ann erville, well known amonj or his 

work as Japanese «.. i and later at 

turer. was married today to Miss Laura Spraker. who 
ty, and wealth. De Guervillc has I 
of friends for himself amongst the best people in New 
York. 

Mrs, Oelriohsand Miss Fair were the only two Califor- 

nians who graced the Patriarchs' Ball. Mrs. Oelricbs 1 

saw at the opera not long ago. very beautiful in pale blue 
satin, and more animated than 1 have ever seen her. 

Henry Scott and family are at the Holland House. 
".lack " Went worth, of Sacramento, at the Albemarle. 
diss Ida Scooffy has just returned to New York, and will 
leave for California almost immediately after Christmas. 

"Joe " Redding leaves to-morrow to spend the Christ- 
mas holidays with friends in New Hampshire, but will re- 
turn before the New Year; 

December .'•;, 1896. Passe Paktodt. 



The most beautiful things in Japanese bronzes, ivories, tapestries 
and curios are to be had of G. T. Marsh & Co., (12:, Market Street. 
Such things are rapidly becoming rare and only in a few places can 
the genuine article be obtained at a low cost. 



DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

Ostrander Repeating Gun Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location o 
works or factory— 36 New street, East Boston. Mass. 

NOTICE— There are delinquent upon Ibe following described stock, on 
account of an assessment (No. 5), levied on the 22d day of August, 1896, 
the several amounts set opposite the names of the respective sharehold 
ers, as follows" 





No. 


No. 




Name. Certificate 


Shares 


Am't 


C. A. Macomber 


405 


500 


50 


" 


406 


500 


50 


A. H. Brawner 


119 


600 


60 


" 


120 


61)0 


60 




131 


300 


30 


" 


190 


500 


50 


" 


209 


500 


50 


" 


210 


1,000 


100 


" 


211 


1,000 


100 


W.P. Ray, TT. s. N. 


123 


1,000 


100 


Mrs. Elizabeth Carter 


194 


500 


50 


'• 


311 


500 


50 


J. M. Helm 


164 


600 


60 


" 


258 


301 


30 10 


" 


260 


155 


15 50 


W. H. H. Hart 


416 


1,000 


100 


M. W. Kirwan 


431 


1.000 


100 


Catherine S. Whiteside 


204 


1,000 


100 


George H Hoover 


389 


50 


5 


W. S. Zeilin 


213 


250 


25 


Mrs. Mary Mearse Gait 


179 


1,000 


100 


John A. Wright 


430 


105 


10 50 


Gdo. O. Davis, Trustee 


435 


200 


20 


" 


436 


200 


20 


" 


437 


100 


10 


E. p. Cole 


397 


500 


50 



And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors, made 
on the 22d day of August, 1896, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company, No. 216 Bush street, rooms 50 and 51, City and County of San 
Francisco, California, on 

THURSDAY, THE 22nd DAY OP OCTOBER, 1896, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m. of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale, 

M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
Office— No. 216 Bush street, Rooms 50 and 51, SanFrancisco, Califo nia. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was post- 
poned until 

FRIDAY, the 20th DAY of NOVEMBER, 1896, 
at the same time and place. M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 

SanFrancisco, October 22, 1896. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was post- 
poned until ' 

FRIDAY, the 18th DAY of DECEMBER, 1896, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26, 216 Bush street, San Francisco, Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, November 19, 1836. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meetiog of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held at tbe office of the company on the 18th inst., the sale or de- 
linquent stock was postponed until 

THURSDAY, the 14th DAY OF JANUARY, 1597, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26. 216 Bush street. San Francisco, Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, Dec 28, 1897 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




January 2, 189; 



DEAR EDITH : It is evident that the latest method of 
fashion in Paris is to have the bodice and skirt both 
of one material, relieved, of course, with any amount of 
color in the very ornate and elaborate decoration. This 
style, however, does not seem to interfere with the reign 
of the still popular separate waist. 

We are gradually growing accustomed to the present 
styles, and learning to live up to them. Parting from our 
full sleeves was a terrible wrench; but the sacrifice is ac- 
complished, and we have found means of obtaining the 
same effects. Bows of ribbon placed rather low on the 
shoulder, frills and ruffles that stand out like a coxcomb, 
give that style of width across the shoulders which is in- 
variably becoming. In Paris, coat-sleeves are made quite 
plain, and the ruffled sleeve is either surmounted by a 
wide bow and elegant drapery or two or three frills. The 
Louis Seize sleeve is plain at the top, all the fullness com- 
ing in at the elbow. Sometimes a double set of frills forms 
two fans, one on each side of the arm. Endless top drap- 
eries are indulged in, and if the skirt is of a gossamer ma- 
terial, it is a pretty idea to have five or seven little frill 
flounces for the top of the sleeve. Many of these flounc- 
ings are edged or bound with satin or velvet bebe ribbon, 
black velvet being used to trim vivid pinks or ambers, 
whilst apple-green, or turquoise, or even poppy-red, would 
be trimmed with white satin bebe ribbon. Indeed, ribbons 
are still greatly in favor. A rather wide ribbon does duty 
in short loops for a basque, and decorates the fronts of 
bodices in a new Prince of Wales bow, forming three loops 
at the top (like the Prince's feathers), and two below. 
The real butterfly bow, when properly made, is a perfect 
finish for the back of waist and neck, but it requires skill- 
ful handling. The center must be ruched or gathered to 
imitate the butterfly's body, and the side loops carefully 
arranged like the lovely insect's wings. Ribbons, like 
everything else, must be judiciously used, for they can 
make or mar the dress. Inch-wide velvet ribbon may be 
turned to advantage in a hundred ways, and nothing can 
be prettier. Belts of it wind three times round the waist, 
securely fastened by fancy pins, and bretelles of the same 
are fastened by rosettes with a brilliant paste center over 
the shoulders. On the skirts, graduated widths are used 
in five or seven rows — they begin narrow, gradually widen- 
ing as they reach the hem. Or they are made into a trellis- 
work, unless Vs or a Greek design is preferred. 

Velvets are extensively used in combination with silk 
and wool; chameleon and illuminated shadings, raised and 
sunken designs, plaids and stripes are all seen — in fact, the 
patterns and color combinations are as varied as those of 
the silks. 

Trimmings are greatly used, even skirts being orna- 
mented with passementerie or embroidered bands. Wide 
passementeries are noticeable in jet and colors for trim- 
ming boleros and waists; narrow colored beaded gimps in 
garnet, brown, and green are in demand. Made-up satin 
and velvet revers in a combination of embroidery, lace, and 
beads, are a pretty addition to bodices or jackets. 

Belinda. 

Through Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 

The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad (Santa Fe route) runs daily 
through from Oakland to Chicago first-class drawing room and 
second-class modern upholstered tourist sleeping cars. Lowest rates 
to all points in the United States, Canada, Mexico, or Europe. 
Ticket office, T>44 Market street, opposite Chronicle Building. Tele- 
phone Main 1531. 

No restaurant in this city is better known or more justly popular 
than is Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter Street. The. restaurant is 
patronized by our leading society folk and is the best place in town 
to obtain a meal perfectly cooked. Should you be ordering pies, or 
pastries, or such delicacies, ring up Swain's by telephone and your 
order will receive immediate attention. A special feature is the $1 
dinner between the hours of 5 and 8 p. m. 



Grand Annual 
Midwinter 
Clearance Sale 



Now In Progress. 



+ 



Everything at 

Prodigious 

Sacrifice. 



See Daily Papt-rs for Particulars 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

FINE FURS ; 
and 

SEALSKIN 
GARHENTS 

10 order. Remodeling I 
repairing at prices far 
lnw those of any other I 
rler on the Pacific Cot 
All work guaranteed. 

flD. KOGOURi 

FASHIONABLE FURRIf 
Sl4 Kearny Street (Up-stairs), 

Opposite Chronicle. Formerly cutter with R.villon Freres, Paris 
don. New Yor k. 

Egyptian enamel 

The moat perfect beautlfler the world has ever known; 
instantly transforms tbr sallouest complexion Into one 

rlesa beauty, and imparts the natural fresh- 
bloom of youth: it defies detection, will not rub off, lag J 
day. and is perfectly harmless. Endorsed by pr 
physicians Price. 50 cents and $1 : large size sent pren 
to any part of tht- United Status or Canada on receipt 
price. Manufactured only i>y 




Mrs. M. J. Butler 



131 POST STREET, 



Mothers, besureanduse "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup' 
children while teething. 



for your 



J D. SULLIVAN. 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAV 

Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 
Dr. F. C. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market stre 



January 2. 1897. 



MMNZANITA. 



s.\N PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



»s 



I T peace be unto you this Cbibtmu-Ude, 

' The ways are many ami the w.-rlii i* 
■ [ tbee awhile this crucifix before, 
I let your heart of hearts keep open door ' 
ibal] the Christ-child enter unaware 
With lips of benefice ami shining hair. 

mlrth-aboandinfr, kolhI saint Santa I'laus, 
Make thou our ' 'hrUtmas, let who will our I 
Lead tbou each wanderer to some hearthstone wide. 
That none be lonely on this Christinas-tide, 
Or i( one dreams 01 home in passes trray. 
Drop by his side this manzanita spray. 

Kipe berries red, what tender thoughts ye bring 
Of holly, home and heaven's transcendent Kin.:. 
Who, toiling, trod .ludean sands alone, 
That each might keep glad Christmas with his own; 
s Peace, peace on earth, good will to warring men, 
Ring, happy bells, forever and again! 

flood friends, sweet friends, this time of joyous cheer, 
lMspelling distance brings your faces near, 
And welds what scattered links of love below, 
Within the regnant yule log's ruddy glow ; 
Hut ways are many and the world is wide — 
God's peace abide with you this Christmas-tide. 

Annie Herbert. 

4A R. Edouard Cucuel, wbose charming articles and 
l sketches descriptive of life in Paris have so often ap- 
eared in the News Letter," is at present visiting his 
arents in this city. Some years ago Mr. Cucuel studied 
the San Francisco Art School, and then accepted a 
osition on the Call, his illustrative work even in those 
ays attracting much attention. He left San Francisco, 
owever, and studied in Paris for four years, becoming 
ne of the most popular and able of the little circle of 
jnerican students there. His clever sketches appearing 
1 several of the leading Parisian dailies brought him into 
onsiderable prominence, and he is now a valued member of 
he New York Herald's staff. After his vacation the young 
rtist will return to that city, followed by the good wishes 
f hosts of friends on this Coast. 



■pHE feet of the Four Hundred must needs be well shod. 
1 So indeed must the feet of anyone who makes pre- 
ense to gentility, and it is a matter of note that the 
tyle of my lady's shoe (and of man's too, for that matter) 
hanges oftener than the fashion of her sleeve. The cus- 
om maker of fine footwear seems to be the only salvation 
or the ultra fashionable, and J. M. McNulty, of 139 Post 
Street, is the "Eedfern of the Foot" for San Francisco 
Society. He came from Thomas' of London, and, to quote 
limself "makes shoes for the best people here and the 
lest that come here." He makes his own lasts, imports 
til his stock, and needless to say, the quality of his work 
s above criticism. 



DNE of the most charming calendars for this year is 
entitled the Joaquin Miller Calendar, published by the 
rVhitaker, and Ray Co. of this city. The calendar is 
ielicately illustrated with Californian flowers and contains 
iome good specimens of the verse of America's greatest 
iving poet. It is just the thing to send to your friends as 
1 memento of this State. 



Are You Going East? 
The Atlantic and Pacific Kailroad, Santa Fe Route, is the coolest 
md most comfortable summer line, owing to its elevation and ab- 
lence of alkali dust. Particularly adapted to the transportation of 
families or large parties, owing to its Pullman palace drawing room 
and modern upholstered tourist sleepers, which run daily through 
from Oakland to Chicago via Kansas City. Ticket office, 644 Market 
Street, Chronicle building. Telephone Main 1531. 

Have you been out to Leona Heights yet? If not you have 
missed one of the simple pleasures of life. Commodious electric 
cars run there from all parts of Oakland and Alameda and the 
round trip is onlv fifty cents. There is a good restaurant on the 
grounds, but no bar. This precludes the appearance of any roughs 
on the premises. 

The Genuine " Brown's Bronchial Troches" are sola only la boxes. 
They ato wonderfully efteotlve for Coughs and Throat Troubles. 



SHIPPING AND^OMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309 and 3tl Sansome St. .... s«n Francitco, C» 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

FINULAY, DURHAM & BHOD1E 43 and WThrcadncodlo St.. London 

SIMPSON. MACK1RDY & CO SB South Caatlo St., Llvorpool 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. f OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California St„ S. P. 

Fire Insurance. 

Founded A. D. 179?. 

Insurance Company ot North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,033,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3,192,001.69 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,506,409.41 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 
B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD <£ DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF' AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1826 

Capital, t2,250,00U Total Assets, 16,854,653 65. 
UNITED STATE" ' EPARTMENT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established im 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporates™ 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 
413 California St., S.F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16,700,000 

BALFOUK, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 316 California St., S. F 



no DlfTiDn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buynone but the genu 
Lm. T\\\j\JT\U O i ne — A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physioal 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medioine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Paciflo States. 
J. Q. STEELE & GO., 636 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, II 85; of 100 pills, 12; of 800 pills, 
I8 60; of 400 pills, »«i Preparatory Pills. 88. Send ror circular. 



26 



SAX FRANXISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 




The Doctor — Mrs. Briggs has sent for me to go and see 
her boy, and I must go at once. His Wi he— What is the 
matter with the boy? The Doctor — I don't know: but 
Mrs. Briggs has a book on " What to do Before the Doc- 
tor Comes." and I must hurry up before she does it. — Col- 
lier's Weekly. 

"Have you been able to catch the Speaker's eve?'' 
asked the first lady Member of Parliament. " Have I ? " 
rejoined the second M. P. "Well, rather; I wore my 
navy blue bcngaline with the heliotrope sleeves, and the 
Speaker couldn't keep his eyes off me." — Pearson's Weekly. 

"What do they mean by 'salting a mine,' popper?" 
asked the small boy. '' Is it anything like salting meat ? " 
"No, indeed," answered Mr. Bittwuntz. "When a man 
salts meat, it is because he wants to keep it." — Cincinnati 
Enquirer. 

"Hark!" cried the long-haired magazine poet, "how 
the people cheer me — how they recognize genius '. " "You 
are mistaken." whispered his wife; " they think you're a 
football player I" — Atlanta Constitution. 

" Mudger feels sure his new ' Romeo and Juliet' will make 
a hit." "What are the high lights?" "Juliet dives off 
the balcony in her bloomers and they escape on their 
wheels." — Chicago Record. 

" Waddington. I notice you don't talk much when you dine 
out." " No: it takes all the brains I can muster to work 
things so I won't come out with an oyster fork for my 
after-dinner coffee." — Chicago Record. 

He — When I was a child, don't you know, I fell off my 
rockin' horse and was knocked senseless. Shk— Oh. what 
a pity you weren't treated for it at the time. It's too late 
now, I suppose. — Fun. 

" It is no mere figure of speech to say that that man is 
actuated by a stern sense of duty." "Who is he?" "He 
manages the rudder on one of the ferryboats." — Detroit 
Free Press. 

Dawson — What is 3'our business, may I ask? Bookish 
Stkanoer — I'm a gentleman, sir. That's my business. 
Dawson — Ah! You failed, I see. — Odds and Ends. 

Fuddy — I wonder how Cramer came to marry that Bur- 
ley woman? Duddy — Perhaps he had to do it in payment 
of an election bet. — Boston Transcript. 

" Brassy, I thought you wuz to be captain of the Cyclone 
football team ? " "Iwuz, but me mother cut me hair 
when I wuz asleep." — Detroit Free Press. 

Maud — What is the height of your ambition, dear? Marie 
(blushing) — Oh, something between five and a half and six 
feet.— Tit-Bits. 

Bender — Miss Styles asked me to call again. Fender — 
Oh, indeed ! What firm are you collecting for now? — 
Yonkers Statesman. 

" That couple in the next flat seem fond of each other." 
"Yes; he lets her try to shave him." — Chicago Record. 

Tommy— Oh, paw! Mr. Flacg— Well ? TOMMY — How 
can a solid fact leak out? — Indianapolis Journal. 

" His life is an open book." "Yes; he never closed ac- 
counts." — Chicago Journal. 



The Overland Limited. 

ONLY 3J^ DAYS TO CHICAGO. \\i DAYS TO NEW YORK. 

The Union Pacific is the only line running vestibuled Pullman 
Double Drawing-room Sleepers and Dining Cars daily. San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago without change. Vestibuled buffet smoking and 
library cars between Ogden and Chicago. Upholstered Pullman 
Sleepers, San Francisco to Chicago, without change, daily. Steam- 
ship tickets on sale to and from all points in Europe. For tickets 
and sleeping car reservations apply to D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 



The Press Clipping borkau, 610 Montgomery street, S. P. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Khabny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital, 11,000,000. Pald-Up Capital, 1300,000. 

OFFICERS 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. IS. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Pbelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1895 fcM,J02,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1.575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 

f -ass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ngs,6:30to8. 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansohe & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus W.250,000 

John J. Valentine President 1 Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier I F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 

N.Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St., S. F. 



Capital actually paid up In Cash, tl.OOO.OOO. 
Deposits, Dec. 31,1895 130,727,586 59. 



Reserve Fund I 715,000 

Guaranteed Capital. .11,200,000 



DIRECTOItS. 

B A . BECKER President 

EDWARD KRUSE Vice-Prcsidi int 

DANIEL MEYER 2d Vice-President 

H Horstman, Ign. Steinhart, Nic Van Bergen. Emil Route, H. B. Russ, 
D. N. Walter. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



William Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS. 
S. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 

W. S Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. McCutchen. 
J. B. Lincoln. 



Occidental Hotel, 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, Hanager. 



San Francisco 



you Must Look Neat. 



Suits Cleaned 
and Pressed 



$1.00 



Bau Gifu Glothing Renovatoru, 



Suits called for and delivered. 



£2* Geary St., Easterbrook B'ld'g, 
Rooms 10-20-21. 'Phone Grant 158. 



THe Banjo. 

flshton P. Stevens. 

STUDIO : 26 Montgomery street, 
Room 8. Pupils prepared for Stage, 
Concert, or Drawing Room. A Specla 
Class for 
teachers who wish to perfect themselves in the Banjo's hatmony and technlc 



January 2. 1897. 



SAN FRANC n;R. 






NEW YEAR RUMORS. 

[1 jrd that during Ninny - 
Thjs town will boTrotl all thr paper* 
That loTea tip ; ami put. thor. 

An end to journal! 
Will hang, with rope that will not hreak, 
The tieml that perpetrates a fake. 
I bear that ministers will preach 

once more their nrmonj from the Bible, 
Nor for fat salaries beseech. 

(I really hope this lan't libal . 
The rumor, loo, is growing rife 
That every man will love his wife. 
Nay, more, that Benedicts will I 

To quote th;it obesuiul old, moss-carried. 
About the club where, nlgfal till morn. 

All innocently they have lamed, 
But stay in their domestic hives 
Each blessed evening o( iheir lives. 
These are o,ueer things, I will admit, 

To gain authenticated rumor, 
But I've not told you all of it. 

A signed death-warrant to the bloomet • 
Will soon be filed away, I hear, 
Among the arc hives of the year. 

t'ne more reform. When winter days 

Have melted into torrid summer 
We shall not have to dodge the gaze 

Of every idiot new-comer 
Who made the air around us blue 
With " Is it hot enough for you ? " 

They're saying, too, that all our girls 

Until they've reached the sere and yellow 

With wrinkled brows and corkscrew curls, 
Will never love a richer fellow. 

I might believe the rest of it; 

But this last New Year rumor? Kit! 

The PiTii.osorHEu. 



LOOK to your laurels, Southern California! Fresno has 
thrown down the gauntlet as a producer of the golden 
lemon and orange, and has backed her claim to recognition 
by a successful Citrus Fair. The favored fruits of the 
"frostless belt" are now as an aureole around the head of 
the Raisin Queen. Long live Fresno! Long live the 
grape! The grape helped the Fair to succeed. Instance 
the magnificent Pagoda of the St. George vineyard, whose 
luscious wines brought home a medal from the Atlanta 
Exposition. The choice viutages from "Maltermoro" 
were beautifully .displayed by Manager John H. Markham, 
of the Fresno Branch, and the report of its success is re- 
counted with pride at the branch cellar, 123 Market 
street, in this city. It is a well-known fact that all the 
wines from the St. George vineyard are absolutely pure. 
Adulteration is an unheard of thing, and, figuratively 
speaking, it can be said that the' wine goes direct from the 
grape to the bottle. This is one of the prime reasons why 
these wines are so popular among connoisseurs. The Bur- 
gundy put up at the St. George Vineyard is as palatable 
and delightful a wine as any person can desire. It is 
really surprising that so excellent a wine can be produced 
here in California. 

THE partnership formerly existing between S. E. Dut- 
ton and John Partridge, under the firm name of Dut» 
ton & Partridge, has been dissolved by mutual consent. 
Mr. Partridge has purchased the entire business, and will 
continue as a Stationer and Bookbinder, at 306 California 
street. Having also a thoroughly equipped printing office 
of his own at 42-44 Steuart Street, Mr. Partridge will un- 
doubtedly secure for himself a fair share of the city's 
trade in this particular line. The work turned out under 
his personal supervision is the best that can be procured, 
and his prices are as reasonable as those of any other 
first-class house. Orders for Printing, Lithographing, 
Bookbinding, Stationery, etc., may be left at either office 
and will receive immediate attention. 



The late Senator Fair once said of the J. F. Cutter old Bourbon 
Whiskey that it was the finest ever manufactured. The Senator 
was a good judge of such things and his opinion holds good even to- 
day. E. Martin* Co., 411 Market street, are the agents for this 
delectable liquid and furnish our leading houses with it. 



BANKING. 
BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

■ i.»rtcr. 1«S. 

»i paid up * 

HKADO . *, LOMBARD BTUR, I 

Bra* itmtnstor, KamJoopt Nan 

inmo. ami NVKou, itntish Colombia; Fortluid 

This Mank : . d *ub- 

■ ranted 

available in ;i . world. Approved Hills md sd- 

• ral security. !>ra | rates 

upon its Head Offlofl and Branches, and upon itH Agonta, as follows: 

nkw York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Cnio ago— First National Hank; 

LlVmaPOOL— North and Soulli Wales Hunk; SCOTLAND— British Linen 

Company. [rklahd Hank of treland; Msxioo- London Bank of Mexico : 

SOOTH Am Lin- a London H;»nk Of Moxloo I , na and 

Japan— Chartored Hank of India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and 
New Zeai.ani*— Hunk of Australasia and Comnnr. i:ii Banking Company oi 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West indies)— Colonial Hank. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 13,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Prolits (October 1, 18i)4).. 8,168,18) 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vlcc-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S.Prentiss Smith.... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Ban It of New York,N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand — Bank of 
New Zealand; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Chrlstiania, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

THE 8ATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital 81,000,000 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, km Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill, Cashier. Allen Knight, Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Mil 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V. H. Metcalf, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of tne 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris — Morgan, Harjes & Co 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,600,000 | Paid UpCapital 12,000,000 

Reserve Fund 1850,000 

Head Office. 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM 1 Mana „ era 
C. ALTSCHUL j- Managers, 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital 81,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED, 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized 86,000,000 J Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 f Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sella drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill- 13 f "r collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

-d bullion. IG N. fTgNHAM, } Managers 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain 
A mill attaohed, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance eflected at lowest rates in first-class companies, or grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St. , over the Anglo-Callfornla Bsnk. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1897. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave mod are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ From Mrv. 7, t:00 p. m. IBM. I Arrive 

•0:00 A Niles, San Jose, and way stations 8:45 A 
7:00A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45 P 
7:00 a Benlola, Vaoaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Oroville, and Redding, 

via Davis 6:45 P 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 

Napa, Calistoga, and Santa Rosa 0:15 P 
8:30a Nlles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysvllle and Red 

Bluff 4:15 p 

•8:»A Petersand Milton *7:15P 

0:00a New Orleans Express, Raymond 
(for Yosemtte), Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los Ad- 
Seles, Deming, El Paso, New 
irleans, lind East 4:45P 

9:00 A Martinez and Stockton 4 :45 P 

9:00A Vallejo 6:15 P 

Nlles, San Jose Llvermore, and 

Stockton 7 :16 P 

•1:00 p Sacramento Rlversteamere "9:0UP 

tl:80p Port Costa and Way Stations.... t7:45P 
4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Callstoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9:16 a 

4:00 p Benlcfa, Vacavllle, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysvllle, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 11:16a 

4:80 P Nlles, San Jose, and Llvermore . 8:45a 
4:30P Los Angeles Express, Stockton, 
Fresno, Santa Barbara and Los 

Angeles 10:45 a 

4 :30 p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMoJaveand East 10:45a 

8:00 p European mall, Ogden and East.. 9:46 a 
6:00 p Hay wards, Nlles and San Jose... 7:45 a 

J7 :00 p Vallejo t7 :45 P 

7 :00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysvllle, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 11:15 a 

110:06p "Sunset Limited." Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans, 
and E ast |tt:4$P 

Santa Croz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15a Newark, Centervltle, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 

and way stations 6:60 p 

•8:16p Newark, Centorvllle, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations »11 :30 a 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9:50 a 

fll:45P Humors' Excursion, San Jose 

and way stations J7:30 p 

Coast Divis ion (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:46 A San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only) 1:30 p 

8 :15 A San Jose, Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and 

Srlnctpal way stations 7:06 P 
an Jose and way stations 6:03 p 

11:30 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

•2:30 P San Mateo, Menlo Park. San Jose, 
Gllroy. Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove •10:40 a 

•3:30 p San Jose and way stations 9-50 a 

•4:30p San Jose and Way Stations •8:10 a 

6:30pSan Jose and principal way 

stations »8 :50 a 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:36 a 

?U:46p San Jose and way stations t7:48p 

San Lbandro and Haywabds Local! 



i«6:00 Al 
8:00 a 




r 7:16 A 




'9:45 A 


S:O0A 


MBLROSB, 




10:00 a 


Seminary Park, 


11:45 a 


(11.00 A 


Fitchburo, 


12:45 p 


2:00 P 


Sam Lbakdro, 


(1:46 p 


8:00 p 


and 




4:00 p 


Hatwards. 




5:00 p 




6:15 p 


5:30 p 




7:45 p 


7:00 P 


i Runs through to Nllos. 


8:45 p 


8:00 P 


1 From Nlles. 


9:45 p 


9:00 p 
ttll:16 p 




10:60 P 
rtl2:00 p 



CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
,o F , TO S Sam Frakcisco-Fooi of Market street 

■ Sllp8). 

!? : I5'? :0 5i sn<111:00 *•«■, II :00,»i:00, t3:00, 
•4:00, J6:00 and «6:00p. M .♦«•"". 

From Oak laud— Foot or Broadway. 

"5:00,8:00, 10:00 A. u.. 112:00, •1:00, 12:00, 
•3:00,14:00 •5:00 P.M. 

A for Morning. P for Anornoon. 

•Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 

.. „ ISundays only, 

tt Monday. Thursday, and Saturday nights only 

ITuesdaysand Saturdays 
jSundays and Th ursdays. 

The PACiricTRAHsrER Compart wllloall for 
and oheok baggage from hotels and residences 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 



CANTEEN YARNS. 

A MEMBER of the military band at 
a certain barrack came to the 
surgeon recently with a long face and 
a plaintive story about a sore throat. 

"Sore throat, eh?" said the surgeon 
pleasantly. "Let me see. Oh, that's 
not so bad. A slight irritation, noth- 
ing more. You'll be all right in a day 
or two. I think you had better take 
no risk of renewing the trouble by 
using your throat, though, so I will 
recommend you for a fortnight's sick 
leave. 

Armed with the surgeon's certifi- 
cate, the bandsman obtained his two 
weeks' sick leave. The two weeks 
had just come to an end, when be met 
the surgeon on the parade ground. 
The bandsman saluted. 

The surgeon recognized the face and 
stopped. 

"How's the throat?" he asked 
pleasantly. 

"It's quite well, sir," was the reply. 

"That's good," said the surgeon. 
'You can get back to your duty with- 
out fear. By the way, what instru- 
ment do you handle in the band? 

"The small drum, sir," said the 
musician. 

A good story has been going the 
rounds of a Dorset battalion of volun- 
teers. An officer in attendance at a 
shooting competition noticed two of 
the men tiring with anything but 
William-TeU-like precision. 

Approaching them, he angrily ex- 
claimed: "You fellows don't know 
the way to shoot: lend me a rifle and 
let ii"' show you." 

eg," and the target was missed. 

A broad grin overspread the faces 
of the two privates, but the officer 
was equal to the occasion. 

Turning to the lirst, with a frown 
upon his countenance, he remarked: 
"That's the way you shoot, sir." 

A second attempt, and a similar re- 
sult. 

Turning to the other, he continued: 
"And that's the way you shoot, sir." 

A third shot, and an "inner" was 
Bilked. 

With pardonable pride the officer 
returned the riHe, triumphantly, 
adding: 

"And that's the way /shoot!" 

The men ever since have enter- 
tained a very high opinion of him as a 
marksman. 

—London V. S. Magazine 







CEANICS.S. CO. f\ days TO 
HAWAII, SAMOA, L*. HONOLULU 
NEW ZEALAND, II " 

AUSTRALIA, WS.S. AUSTRALIA. 

S. S. "Zealandia," Thursday, January 7th, at 

2 P. M 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 

January 26, at 2 p. m 

Line to Ooolgardie, Australia, and Capetown, 

South Africa J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS.CO. , 

Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 

MftHtftl St., ,Ql« K'tinMuM 

SOLID SILVER 

toeou. Tbli Ii a Gentleman's Scarf Pin 

or Ladies' Slick Pin, two 

weoolrthow thatop. Tnedoul 

is solid KterliriK silver warranted 

Doe Sample l.y imiil Four Cent* iu 

Add roe a, 
1 VIS'S A CU., 46 Bond bt ., New York. 

The Grand PaGific, fffcfiffif 

MliS ELLA CORBETT, Proprlcm ss 
Furnished rooms by the day, week, or mouth. 
Telephone: Grant, 507. 




SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

TlBDBON FERRY- Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 A u; 18:35.3:30 
6:10, fl:3u p m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11 :30 p M. 

SUNDAYS-S:O0,9:3O, 11:00a u; 1:30 3:30, 5:00, 
6:2U PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— «:15, 7:50, 9:20, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 
3:40, ft : in p M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :55 
and 6:35 p M. 

SUNDAY'S— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AM; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
«:ift p m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 

same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Effect 


Arrive in S. F. 


Week 

Days. 


Sundays.j DKSII . I10H , 


Sundays. 


Week 
Days. 


7:30 AM 

3:30 PU 
ft:lf>PM 


8:00 AM 

9:30 am 
ft-mipM 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
S»nta Rosa. 


10 AD A M 
8 10pm 
7 :3ft P M 


S :40am 
10 :25AM 
6:22PM 






Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle, 










10:25 AM 












8:00 am 


7:35 PM 










7:30 am| 8:00AM K'iJjftKj 7:35PM 


6 :22PM 


3-30pm| 8:00am ! Ouernevllle| 7:35pm 


10 25AM 

6:22 PM 


7:30AMI 8:00AM 1 Sonoma, 10:40am 
5:10pm| 5:00pm 1 Glen Ellen. I 6:10pm 


8:40AM 
6 :22 P M 


7:30AM[ 8:00am | Q-n.-tn-oi 110:40am 
3:30pm| 5:00pm | Sebastopol. | 6:10pu 


10:25AM 
6:22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay and Lake- 
port; at Hopland for Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs; at Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs. Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper 
Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day's, River- 
side. Lierley's, Buckuell's Sushedoin Heights. 
Hullville, Boonevllle, Greenwood, Orr's Hut 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, 
Usal, Willltts, Cab to, Covelo, Laytonville, Har- 
ris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets atre- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays .Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 

H.C. WHITING, R. K. RYAN, 

Gen. Manager. 



Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Stumers leave Broadway Wharf. San Fran- 
cisco for ports in Alaska. 9 a.m.. Dec. 10,26. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Dec. 5, 10, 
15. 20, 28, 80, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka {Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pom- 
ona," at 2 p. m. Dec. 7, it, 16, 19. 23, 27, 31, and 
every fourth day thereafter. 

For Newport, Los AngeleB and all way ports, 
at 9 a. m.; Dec. 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 26, 09, ana every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego ,8 topping only at Port Harford 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Dec. 7. 11, 15, 19, 23. 27. 
31. and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. h. 

For Ensenuda, Magdalena Bay. San Jose del 
Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La Paz. Santa Rosalia, 
and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 
a. h, 25th of eacti month. 

The company reserves right to change steam- 
ers or sailing dates . 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. San Francisco 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO 

For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRAN- 

NAN STREETS, at 1 P Id, for YOKOHAMA and 

HONGKONG, calling at Kobe (Hiogo). Naga- 
saki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong 
kong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo re- 
ceived on board on day of sailing. 

Belgic Tuesday, December 20, 1896 

(via Honolulu).. ..Saturday, Jan. 16, 1897 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, Feb 2, 1897 

Doric Tussday, February 23, 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's 
Office, No. 421 Market street, corner First. 

D. D. STU1JBS, Secretary 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER. 



JANUARY 9, 1897. 




MR, SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDQE; 
Candidate for United States Senator, 



Price per Copy. 10 I 



Annual Sul 




Nets-*- *& 




(&vilif jO(miOU>Jkrxrti sjcx\ 




Vol.LJV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 9, 1897. 



Number 2. 



Printed and Publish' ■iy l>y tie proprietor . FRJCI) MAR/tli> I J 

6H Kearny street, van Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
ofice as Second-class Matter. 

The ofice of the XEWS LKTTSR in -Vnr Tort City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago. vo3 Uvyce Bail. ling, ifrant S Morrison. Sasttrn 
Representative), trtiere information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 



A 



A Y( 'R Phelan commences work with the good wishes 
of every honest and intelligent citizen. 

JUDGE Sanderson, in stepping down from the Bench, 
has the satisfaction of knowing that he has done his 
duty conscientiously and well. 

THE sugar plantations of Cuba are said to be well-nigh 
destroyed, but the harvest of lies from that troubled 
island was never more abundant than at the present time. 



CALIFORNIA is over supplied with poker-playing 
farmers and kid-gloved fruit growers. More down- 
right earnest work is needed in the country, and less sit- 
ting upon the fences waiting for the "home-seeker" to 
come along with a pocketful of money. 

JUT ILLIONS of dollars are expended by tourists and 
J 1 health-seekers in Southern California each year. 
With proper advertising, suitable hotels and other induce- 
ments, this part of the State would likewise profit largely 
by the entertainment of travelers and visitors. 

THE Health Officer at Berkeley does not receive the 
support of the local school directors in his efforts to 
enforce vaccination. These gentlemen are strangely de- 
ficient in knowledge. A certificate of vaccination should 
everywhere be insisted upon, as a requirement of admis- 
sion to the public schools. This rule is strictly followed in 
San Francisco. 

IN one respect, at least, Santa Clara sets a fine example 
to many other counties in this State. No less than 
two hundred and fifty miles of her roads, outside of city 
and town limits, are systematically sprinkled. The plant 
for this purpose, including ninety miles of pipe line, has 
cost $150,000. This is one of the reasons why Santa 
Clara has such good roads, and why her lands command 
good prices. 

NO less than seventy-two applicants for admission to 
the bar underwent examination this week before Com- 
missioners of the Supreme Court. Most of these mis- 
guided young men would earn a better living by following 
the plow than they are likely to enjoy for years to come in 
their mischosen profession. There are too many lawyers 
now, and not half of them can fairly be called successful. 

THE wholesale removals of deputies and other public 
servants, with each administrative change in the 
City Hall, is one of the evils of the spoils system. A num- 
ber of experienced and capable men have recently been 
dismissed, merely for the purpose of rewarding political 
henchmen. While this practice continues, there is small 
encouragement for any deputy to perfect himself in the 
duties of his position. 

THE report of the Code Commissioners contains many 
good recommendations, the adoption of which by the 
Legislature would serve to clear up and improve the ex- 
isting law of the State in relation to .various important 
matters. None of the proposed amendments has, so far, 
excited much opposition. The Commission seems to have 
done good and careful work, and its report justifies the 
appropriation for this purpose. 



PRESIDENT Doorman of the Merchants' Association 
says, in replj to Dr. Stallard, thai Ibe methods 
of governing foreign municipalities are not applicable in 
this country. The chief reason is thai politics here pre- 
vents the election of officials tor their personal merit, the 
nominations being, with few except nl rolled by 

corrupt bosses. Concentration of power in the executive 
head has proved to be the best course for American cities. 



IN the absence of a duty on anthracite, commonly known 
as hard coal, its importation has steadily increased at 
this port. Ten years ago, the yearly imports here scarcely 
reached two thousand tons; last year they amounted to 
about ninety thousand tons. This coal comes from Swan- 
sea, Wales. Its admission, free of duty, is obviously a dis- 
tinct benefit to our consumers, but, curiously enough, Con- 
gressman Loud is said to have been urged from California 
to have a protective duty put upon anthracite. This might 
help Pennsylvania, but where would be the gain to this 
State ? 

ASSEMBLYMAN Cutter proposes an amendment to the 
Constitution to the effect that the death or disability 
of a juror, during the trial of a civil or criminal cause, 
excepting capital offenses, shall not interfere with the 
rendering of a verdict, so long as three-fourths of the 
original number of jurors remain in the box. It also allows 
three-fourths of the original number of jurors to give a ver- 
dict in all criminal cases less than capital, as now in all 
civil cases. This amendment would cure serious defects 
in the existing jury system. It should be adopted. 



THE British system of municipal government consists 
in the selection of a large administrative board, with 
no concentration of power. This has worked admirably in 
such cities as Glasgow and Birmingham, which are models 
of good government. But party politics cuts no figure in 
the choice of aldermen or councilmen abroad. Here the 
selection of a satisfactory governing board is not to be ex- 
pected under the present political system. For this 
reason it has proved best, in American cities, to concen- 
trate power as much as possible — particularly in the hands 
of the Mayor. 

NOW that the new Board of Education and the Grand 
Jury have determined to investigate affairs apper- 
taining to the School Department, there is every chance 
that many of the glaring abuses permitted under the old 
Boards will be stopped in short order. The over-employ- 
ment of teachers and substitutes, the result in many cases 
of a pernicious system of favoritism, is apparently the most 
glaring. By cutting this list down considerably and con- 
fining it within reasonable limits, much money will be 
saved to tax-payers, and a just return of services will be 
demanded of those remaining and receiving full and ade- 
quate remuneration. 

EXPERIENCE has shown the folly of making laws 
against usury. Such enactments were long ago 
shown to be injurious to borrowers, and merely an ob- 
struction to enterprise and business. Exorbitant rates 
of interest are justly condemned in the popular mind, but 
yet more harm is done by legislative attempts to check the 
gains of money-lenders than by leaving capital to offset 
the risks of loans by the charge demanded for the use of 
money. The rate of interest is always proportioned to 
the supply and demand for money, the security afforded, 
and various other conditions. Laws never have controlled 
it, and never will. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



THE LAW-MAKING BODY IN SESSION. 

CALIFORNIA'S Legislatures have never been tilings of 
beauty, much less joys for ever. As a matter of fact, 
they b ten been mJv. corrupt, festeriog u 

upon the body politic. Their'members have formed 
bines" to extort blood from everything that would bleed 
their methods have been shamelessly confessed in open 
court, but without anybody being punished. E 
material interest that could be harassed by 
cunningly devised for that purpose, has been compelled to 
purchase immunity by a liberal distribution of largess 

g hungry members. Legislators go to Sacramento 
at the beginning of every session with their grip 
stuffed full of "cinch" bills, supplied them, in many in- 
rascally lawyers who, in the course of their 
practice, have learned how this, that, or the other inter- 
est may be bled. The nursing of these measures until they 
ed their purpose, has occupied the time and at- 

on of members to the exclusion of all considerations of 
public usefulness. It has been as if the Legislature were 
designed as a mere gouging instrument for the use and 
benefit of needy and seedy politicians. An army made up 
of members, lobbyists, attachit, and hangers-on, manages 
to live from year to year, God only knows how, upon the 
things that can be picked up around the Capitol at 1 

evils have of late years gone from bad to 
worse. In earlier days, an outward show of decer.cy was 
preserved, but when Boss Buckley's reign began, all pre- 
tenses to honesty were thrown to the winds, and scandal- 
ous bargainings, corruption, and licentiousness ran riot 
around the legislative halls. It has hardly been possible 
to exaggerate the condition of affairs. Not a tithe of what 
happened was ever told, yet more than enough has time 
and again been revealed to cause good citizens to bin 
their so-called representative men. To the shame of this 
great city, which elects over one fourth of the whole Legis- 
lature, its delegations have usually been the very worst 
in the pack. Once upon a time, the country members 
could be depended upon to neutralize the evil machinations 
of the gates, but, as evil communications corrupt 

good manners, so it came to pass that little dependence 
could be placed upon enough members to constitute a 
majority. The Capitol became a place for the purchase 
and sale of things that ought to be above all price. 
California's Legislature became a byword and a reproach 
among men. Good citizens heaved a sigh of relief and 

l;ed God when each bii -ion came to an end. 

Is this bad history to repeat itself in regard to the Legis- 
lature now in session ? There are grounds for both hope 
and fear. The hope springs from various considerations. 
In the first place, quite a number of men of ability 
character are members of this Legislature, and, whilst 
they do not constitute a majority, it may well be believed 
that this little leaven will cause an elevation of the whole. 
The last election was an earnest one. that betokened a 
quickening of the public conscience. It would seem to fol- 
low that members elected under a revived condition of 
public spirit would necessarily share in the more earnest 
convictions of their constituents. Public opinion is not as 
quiescent as it used to be, and we do not believe that the 
niiento of recent years would now be toler- 
mbers will do well to take account of the better 
spirit of the times, and govern themselves accordingly. 
A bad record will now bring more odium than formerly. 
As the members generally realize that fact, they will, it 
may be presumed, be more cautious. Those who hope for 
future political preferment will be more than cautious to es- 
chew evil; they will be mindful to be aggressive for the right. 
If they can return home with the proud consciousness of 
duties well and faithfully performed, they will be rare excep- 
tions to the general rule of recent legislators, and may rest 
assured of their ultimate reward at the hands of a grate- 
ful people. At the same time, it is to be regretted that 
there are already grounds for fear in the number of bad 
bills announced for introduction. All the old cinch bills 
appear to have been resurrected, and a majority of them 
are in the hands of members of the San Francisco delega- 
tion. The signs indicate that there is already another 
"combine," or the hope of one. It C8 soon be fer- 

reted out and exposed; a consideration which forces upon 
us an expression of a hope that the dailies will be faithfully 



aud adequately represented at Sacramento this winter. 
They 1 ways been so represented. A few sessions 

ago" a majority of the correspondents were found to be on 
Ijuc'lili at no time have the dailies 

been n I by sufficient reportorial strength. His 

not enough that a long and dry detail of the routine busi- 
Eaeh daily would find more interest- 
ing and useful work to do by detailing two bright report- 
ers to watch the ways that are dark and tricks that are 
vain of the lobhir -. It is there that hap- 

penings occur in which the public are most interested. It 
is then -1 delight the heart of the 

managing editor, are to be made. 

The less disturl hreatened legislation this ses- 

sion the better. The State is not con- suffering to 

.ing too few laws. It will not 

realize that it has lost anything if not another enactment 

is added to the statute book this session. In fact, we have 

v tOO many laws, and could well dispense with not a 

In that respect we are governed too much. 

1 ould be esteemed the model legislator who best ex- 
poses ami prevents the passage of bad bills. As times go, 
the more ignorant and impracticable the member, the more 
ambitious he is to add something to an already too 

oric statute book. This fallacious idea cannot be too 

abandoned. If the Legislature would at this session 
cut down its appropriations to the issirv expenses of 

arious institutions of the State, levy a rate propor- 
tioned to this wise economy, and then adjourn sine die, it 
would deserve better of the people of California than any 
Legislature it has ever had. and would live in the memories 
of men. as well as in the pages of history, as an exemplar 
and an ideal to representative bodies generally. Without 
a doubt, our people would will that it should so do, could 
they be consulted. If the life of the session must be pro- 

1 to the full sixty days permitted to it by law, let 
that life be itful as possible. Our people desire 

to be let alone in their present well-doing, and have no 
need of heroic laws, anyway. 

The The contest now on in Sacramento over the 
Senatorial choice of the United States Senator should 
Contest, attract the attention and interest ot 
the people of California to an unusual 
degree, on account of the elements which enter into it. and 
pon which it is being conducted by the respective 
candidates. It has been some time since talent, ambition, 
youth, brains and eloquence have engaged in a contest for 
the high office of Senator against wealth, age and medio- 
crity before the California Legislature, and the spectacle 
of a comparatively young man who possesses the former 
entering the lists with one who is generally notable for the 
latter, may well excite the interest of every citizen. 

The career of Samuel M. Shortridge in California, which, 
through years of gradual growth in public esteem has 
finally led up to an assertion of his claims upon the office 
of U. S. Senator, is one which should awaken admiration 
in the mind of every man who himself has strong and 
noble ambitions for the attainment of honor and the 
achievement of success in life. 

Mr. Shortridge came to California a poor boy, com- 
pelled from his childhood to labor for a livelihood' and an 
education. He worked among the miners of Nevada 
County until he could earn enough money to go to school. 
en attended the public schools and passed through 
all their gradations until he had fitted himself to teach in 
hools in which lie had been taught. He thus ob- 
d the means which enabled him "to attend a law 
school, and to gratify bis first ambition for a professional 
career. 

The expanding of his natural talents and acquired at- 
tainments d struggle for an education and pre- 
paration for a calling, awakened in his mind a new and a 
nobler aspiration. He felt himself capable of becoming an 
orator, and began to display a power of moving the minds 
-1 through his eloquent and thoughtful discussions of 
public affairs. The possession of this talent in a marked 
degree suggested to the mind of Mr. Shortridge and to his 
many friends the idea that there was a proper forum for 
their display, and aroused his ambition to attain, sooner 
or later, a seat in the United States Senate. For the 
past several years this ambition has been one of the fore- 



Janu. 



FRAN*. 






:.il though' .ii ion of • 

of public affairs. 

er. Mr. S pre- 

himself to till the high office of Dnil 
Senator that no Inmost ami impartial jiulj.'"' Of his attain- 
ments will deny liU emini - for the place. The 
many friends of Samuel M Shorlridge, throughout the 
State of California, realize that the time has come when 
Us years of service to the Republican Party should have 
their proper recompense and when his talents and 
matured powers of thought and expression should be given 
a proper sphere. Thi lhat the time has come in 
the nation when its Senate should cease to deserve the re- 
proach of being a club of millionaires, and should In 'nine 
a council of statesmen. They deem it especially fitting 
that California which has done more than its share in 
bringing upon the Senate the former reproach should 
make a present attempt to restore to it the latter virtue. 
It is for this reason that the candidacy of Samuel M. 
Sbortridge for the Senate is growing daily in favor and 
strength before the State Legislature, and is meeting 
with widespread approval among those who possess a 
proper conception of the kind of man a Senator should be. 
and who believe that the State of California would honor 
itself by selecting one of its foremost representatives in 
culture and in eloquence to fill the place. 

The Governor's Governor Budd's message to the legis- 
Message. lature is a long, clear, forcible docu- 

ment, brimfull of useful information and 
valuable suggestions. A careful reading of it leaves the 
impression on one's mind that our Governor is strenuously 
endeavoring to do his duty to the whole State, and that he 
is bringing to the performance of that task an active 
temperament, quick perceptions, and considerable execu- 
tive ability. Not in many years has such a mau occupied 
the gubernatorial chair. He fits the times, and the times 
suit him. A spirit of retrenchment and reform is abroad 
in the State, and it is apparent that Governor Budd is in 
close touch with it. As results of his occupancy of office, 
taxes are being materially reduced, and this whilst greater 
efficiency is being maintained in all branches of the public 
service. Every institution and departmenthas been bettered 
by the Governor's earnest and intelligent supervision. His 
recommendations, which are numerous, appear to be all 
well considered, and are calculated to make for better and 
more economical government. If our legislators would 
throw as'de the thousand, or more, bills they propose in- 
troducing, and assiduously devote themselves to giving 
effect to the Governor's suggestions, they would find work 
enough to do for this session, and would make a record in 
advance of any legislature the State has ever had. Now 
is the time for the press of the State to be earnest and 
vigilant in expressing and enforcing public opinion. Our 
law making body must not be permitted to forget what 
the people have demanded. Nothing is clearer than that 
the people desire a low tax rate, and, for the rest, to be 
let alone to recuperate. The Governor has shown how 
this can be done, and his lead ought to be followed. The 
State has been generous to the point of extravagance, 
and its Government is now practically a vast-eleemosynary 
institution. It should run its different institutions on 
strict business principles, which it does not do when it 
pays twice as much for supplies in one place as it does in 
another. There should be one purchasing agency for all. 
Managers and Superintendents should have as little to do 
ae possible with contractors. The Governor's suggestions 
as to changing the incidence of taxation will cause dis- 
cussion, but he is right in saying that reality ought Dot to 
bear the whole burden of government. 

New Light The opponents of refunding in Congress 
On Funding, are beginning to perceive that there are 
more difficulties in the way of the Govern- 
ment foreclosing its liens than they had supposed. Senator 
Pettigrew, having a grievance against the Union Pacific 



him with i 
d more thai 

ir now wants the ( 

t In- Btde lilies It appears thai 

i ke1 of (he v.i 
000,000 which I p, and 

the Senator wisl — to vote the necessary money. 

• ' e front which the ai 
fumlers have ail They COU 

he imli . ed to -ay. I I did not know, of what use 

the main lines would be to the Government, or to anybody, 

w IthOUl tl ■ derS, side lines, 

etc. The-- 'acific Companj coulddrop the 

tral out of its system tomorrow and yet carry on its 
business pretty much as if nothing had happened. 
The Government would have a road-bed from Dgden 
by way of Niles to San Jose, but that is all. e 
the great debt it would then have to either pay 
oil or renew. For our own part, no cannot see why 
Mr. Huntington, or any of his associates, need care 
what becomes of their oiler to assume the Central's 
debts and furnish further security, if time he granted 
them. The Government has nothing to foreclose worth 
foreclosing, whilst they have nothing to lose the 
loss of which would harass them overmuch. We can see, 
however, and that very plainly, that it is of the great- 
est consequence to this city to maintain its one direct line 
to Chicago, and, to that maintenance, its terminals and 
feeders are indispensable. Los Angeles and the Southern 
counties generally would be benefited by the abandon- 
ment, or even the crippling of the Central Pacific. The 
line to Salt Lake City would in that case, and in that only, 
be built, and the port of San Francisco would either be 
shut off from direct connection with Chicago, orsuffercom- 
petition with a better route to either San Pedro or Santa 
Monica. The Central Pacific, by itself, is nothing; as a 
part of a great system, it is the best available guarantee 
of the continued supremacy of San Francisco as a commer- 
cial entrepdt. 

Loans to the There is a redundancy of idle money in 
Farmers and San Francisco that would soon find safe 
Other Producers, andprofitableemploymentif only it were 
sought in the right direction. Because 
it takes less time and trouble to investigate the title and 
value of a city lot than it does those of a back country 
farm, the disposition has been to loan too much on the one 
and little or nothing on the other. Sound policy would 
dictate an opposite policy. To make San Francisco per- 
manently prosperous, there is now a pressing need to de- 
velop the country tributary to her. That is the way in 
which &reat cities are built up. Vacant city lots yield 
nothing, and of residential houses this peninsula has 
enough for the present requirements of the existing pop- 
ulation. It is well to light up the streets we have, to add 
betterments to our highways, and improve down-town 
places of business, but there is little profit in adding to 
the number of tenantless houses. Money that is invested 
in dead property is an injury to borrower and lender alike, 
whereas money placed in productive and profitable enter- 
prises fructifies, increases, gives employment., and, in the 
end, multiplies homes in this city in the very best way pos- 
sible. In many of our older States the value of country 
securities is so well understood that their owners borrow 
money cheaper than it can be obtained on city realty. 
Secretary Morton, in his last annual report, makes this 
abundantly clear. In seventeen States the average rate 
of interest on farm mortgages is less than that demanded 
on city residential property. In Pennsylvania, Mary- 
land, Virginia. "West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Wis- 
consin, Iowa, Kansas, Texas, and Alabama the interest 
exacted of farmers is less than that required from owners 
of other realty. The difference varies from one-half of one 
per cent, to one and-one-half per cent. Investors invar- 
iably prefer the productive borrower to the ODe who has 
city property that may be productive or not, just as it 
may happen to find a tenant. The Secretary points out 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



that country land values have increased in the last decade, 
showing that there is no diminution in the security held. 
We are not belittling city values, but pointing out the 
surest way to increase them. Build up the country, in- 
crease the number of people who produce something, ren- 
der the employment of capital and labor productive, mul- 
tiply the transactions of our middlemen, enlarge our in- 
dustrial population— accomplish all these things by lend- 
ing a helping hand to country development, and then, as 
surely as effect follows cause, the Queen City of the Pacific 
will prosper as never before. 

The Mayor's Mayor Phelan's inaugural address has the 
Inaugural. right ring about it. He speaks with that 
certainty, clearness, and force that can 
only come from full and exact knowledge. He renders it 
obvious from the start that he is well equipped for the 
creditable discharge of even more onerous duties than 
those which he is permitted to perform under the existing 
laws of this municipality. The pity is that the new charter 
was not ratified at the same time with the election of a 
Mayor so pre-eminently qualified to put it into successful 
operation. As it is. jt will not do to expect too much from 
Mayor Phelan. Great as his capacity undoubtedly is. and 
good as his intentions are, he can accomplish but little 
under his present grant of powers. Nearly all he can do 
he has done, in pointing out intelligently and well the 

re and extent of the practical reforms which the 
Hoard of Supervisors alone has the power to carry into 

t. There can be, and there must be, lower taxation. 
and greater efficiency in the public service. It will always 
remain a marvel that during the hardest times this city 
ever knew, the very highest rate of taxation was need- 
lessly imposed, and borne by oppressed taxpayers with a 
submission worthy of a better cause. A rate of 12.25 on 
the hundred, yielding a total of $6,896,872, was an intoler- 
able burden that would have resulted in a general refusal 
to pay in a less law-abiding city than this. When to this 
is added the sum of $1,630,613, derived from licenses and 
other sources of revenue, it must be conceded that for a 
city practically out of debt, the burden of taxation is 
shamefully too great. If the newly-elected Supervisors 
take kindly to the well-considered suggestions of the 
Mayor, he and they working in harmony together will give 
San Francisco a better municipal administration than it 
has known in many years. If the Mayor has but little 
power to do much of either good or evil, the Supervisors 
are abundantly endowed with the capacity to do either or 
both. In these days of much civic pride, it will go hard 
with thorn if they do not find a way to do less of evil and 
more of good than their predecessors of unhappy memory. 

Reform the Elect- The Baltimore American has taken 
oral College. up the question of the inconsistencies 
in the electoral vote as apportioned 
among the States, with considerable warmth and much 
reason. In studying the election returns. The Amer- 
ican is impressed with the [act that Maryland cast 250,841 
votes, and South Carolina 68,938 votes, on November 3rd 
last. And yet Maryland has only eight votes in the elec- 
toral college, while South Carolina has nine. In other 
words, each elector in the former State represents 31,365 
voters, and in the latter only T.Tl'il. " Where is the just- 
ice ? " inquires The American. Though the whole coun- 
try knows why it is so, the question is a very pertinent 
and timely one, and is by no means answered in the flip- 
pant reply of the Charleston News and Courier that "they 
appear to have reduced ballot-box stuffing to a science in 
Maryland." It has not been charged, and there is no 
reason to believe, that Maryland's vote was a dishonest 
one. The State had a population of 1,042,390 in 1890, and, 
considering the natural increase, the vote cast would be 
about one "for every live of the population, which is the 
usual estimate throughout the country. The vote was un- 
questionably normal, and fairly represented the will of the 
whole people. The census of 1*:hi gives South Carolina 
1,161,149 inhabitants. We do not know what increase 
there may have been in the last six years, but, upon the 
figures given, South Carolina cast, or at least counted, 
only one vote for more than sixteen of the population. San 
Francisco cast nearlv as main votes with onlv about one- 



third the number of inhabitants. The normal colored vote 
of South Carolina, if honestly counted, would be twice the 
vote that has been returned to the whole State. If this 
condition affected alone the State in which it obtains, the 
matter might be left to its inhabitants for solution. But 
when the vote of a man in one section equals the vote of 
more than three men in other sections of the country in 
the selection of national officers and representatives, the 
wron" becomes too serious to pass unnoticed. If the 
present method of electing Presidents is to continue, the 
votes in the electoral college should be apportioned upon 
the votes cast at the previous Presidential election. There 
is the justice for which The Baltimore American justly 
clamors. 

A Suggestion Hawthorne's advice that only aged men 
From nt to battle is worth consideration at 

The Dead. this present moment. He may not have 
foreseen the present Cuban situation. 
His prophetic glance mav not have rested on the aged 
Senators who are so permeated with martial valor, but 
we recommend to these elderly gentlemen and to the 
eountrv at large that his suggestion be followed. It will 
be especially attractive to the Senators themselves. It 
offers them "an opportunity to close their public careers 
in a blaze of glory. History would embalm their deeds 
for the perusal of remotest posterity. Accounts of their 
prowess on the tented field would fix their names indelibly 
in the rolls of fame, while their jingo resolutions will be soon 
it ten. Spaniards are notably an impulsive, impres- 
ible, superstitious race, and when they beheld 
battalions of hoary-headed wraiths advancing upon them, 
must surely surrender at discretion. The war would end 
without carnage. It would be the next best thing to 
arbitration, and far more satisfactory than the "good 
offices" they propose. When Cuba was pacified, those of 
our ancient and honorable champions who did not catch 
the yellow fever, and those who did not prefer the climate 
of the ever faithful isle for their rheumatism, might re- 
turn to receive the plaudits and the pensions of their 
grateful country. It would be no small advantage, too, to 
allow the young and vigorous men to remain at home and 
continue the active development of our resources. This 
' should not be overlooked. The sooner it is carried out 
the sooner we shall be relieved of the humiliating spectacle 
now presented by the Senate, and the better it will be 
for the United States, the Cubans, the Senators them- 
selves, and in short, all concerned except, perhaps, the 
Spaniards. 



The City And The Board of Health has done well in 
County Hospital taking a firmer grip on the manage- 
ment of the City and County Hospital. 
Heroic action was necessary, and it must be conceded that 
there is not a little heroism in a member of the Board, 
having a good private practice, personally taking hold of 
the management until it can be placed upon a creditable 
footing. We notice that it is proposed to spend over $10,- 
iiihi in improving the plumbing and sanitary condition of 
the Hospital, and no doubt the proposed improvements 
are urgently needed, if the building is much longer to 
serve its present purposes. As a matter of fact, it ought 

. long since to have been supplanted by a newer and better 
structure, and we know of no more pressing obligation up- 
on the New Board of Supervisors than that of makiug 
provision for such a Hospital as this City and County ought 
to have. If we begin to patch up the old building now, we 
shall have to keep on patching it until more money is ex- 
pended than would provide a new and adequate structure. 
It is not alone the sewers and plumbing that are out of 
order; the floors are rotten and ought to have been re- 
moved long since. They have threatened collapse for 
many a day past Erected in 1869, when Dr. Beverly 

I Cole was chairman of the Supervisors' Health Committee, 
the building was only intended as a make-shift from the 
start. It has seen service far too long. Cold, draughty, and 
badly arranged in every way. the time has fully arrived' when 
a new building should be provided. A City and County 
Hospital is the greatest, the most useful, and the most 
aary of the city's charitable institutions. We could 
have done far better without a new Hall of Jistice than 
without a new Hospital. 



Januaiy o, 1897. 



FRANC \V> LBTTKR. 



AT THE CAPITOL. 

• tii. January 6, 

THK Legislature the thirty- 

In fact, more Imj 
■me up for ,tion tlian n 

have any idea of. and. after tl 

oided n t -xt week, both bout down to work, 

and work they must, unli mbers wlah to *tnv in 

Sacramento more than the Constitutional • 
days— at their own expense. It is only right to say. how- 
ever, that both houses have already evidenced a laudable 
desire to get down to work, and in this regard the '• 
bly has made a better record than the Senate. 

The economical trait i> largely in evidence in both 
houses, and the lists otattachl* have been carefully pruned, 
and many disappointed office-seekers are now homeward 
bound, some on foot and some otherwise. That reminds 
one that there were missing this year many of the old-time 
place-seekers, who bob up serenely each recurring ses- 
sion. Of course, some of them are dead, but usually there 
has been any quantity, if not quality, of new material 
to take the places of the missing ones. The female place- 
seeker is, the Lord be blessed, few in number — and, by 
the way. greatly improved in personal appearance. This 
year they can be classed as few. young, and, to all appear- 
ances, decent. 

The colored contingent is here, though, in large and 
black numbers, and every Afro-American club in the 
State has representatives on the ground who are willing to 
take any kind of a job for any kind of a per ditm, and a 
goodly number have been provided for — of course, after 
members' sons, brothers, wives, and daughters have been 
properly looked after. 

In this regard it may be said that more legislators this 
■ year have provided for their families, who are here with 
them, than ever before — a fact that their patronage- 
seeking constituents will not forget when they run for 
office again, as most legislators generally do. 

The Senate is really composed of some very bright men 
and any quantity of oratorical ability. In fact, when sil- 
ver-tongued Wolfe, Dickinson, Stratton, Seawell, La Rue, 
Doty, Braunhart, Bert, Morehouse, Flint, Bulla, and 
others, less silver-tongued but as voluable, get in action, 
one wonders whether the few who are not orators can, 
with the four walls of the Senate chamber also considered, 
stand the pressure. 

To be Presiding Officer of, the Senate requires more 
ability and tact than most people would imagine. Although, 

generally speakiDg, the 
Senate is a dignified, and, 
at the same time, consid- 
ate body, at times it re- 
quires a sharp, wide-awake 
and determined chairman, 
and from every indication, 
Lieutenant-Governor Wil- 
liam T. Jeter is happily the 
combination of all these 
qualities, and it is safe to 
say is one of the most cap- 
able and satisfactory Pre- 
siding Officers the Senate 
has had for many sessions. 
Although, in the appoint- 
ment of committees, Mr. 
Jeter is of opposite po- 
litical faith from the ma- 
jority of the Senate, he has 
already by his fairness and 
consideration, won the re- 
spect of the majority, and 
has made friends who will not fail to recognize his quali- 
ties. Mr. Jeter, it will be remembered, was the Demo- 
cratic nominee for Lieutenant-Governor two years ago, 
and next to Governor Budd and Supreme Judge Temple, 
who were elected, received the highest vote on the ticket. 
Upon the death of Lieutenant-Governor Millard, Governor 
Budd chose Mr. Jeter to act as Lieutenant-Governor. Mr. 
Jeter lives in Santa Cruz, and has for twelve years served 
the people of both his county and city in public service. 




Lieutenant-Governor IT"'. T. Jeter. 



Bj tl e way, Senator 
b to thi of 

Ing maiden, he bavii g married a lovely Vermont 
weoki 1 fa here With her distinguished 

husband, 

Prank J B the always efficient ond, 1 B 

his efficieni y. it ■ Cbiel Clerk of the Senate, was 

retailed in the pObltlon. Tl ere i- no man behind the desk 
more capable ai 'I more familiar with legislative procedure 
than Mr. Brandon, aid his knowledge is always a great 
help not only 10 the Senators themselves, but to the pre- 
siding officer in particular. 

Assembly is always, probably because numerically 

larger, and therefore mentally weaker, inferior both in 
personal appearance and individual ability than the Sen- 
ate. True, there are some very bright men in that body 
— yea, some very able men, but there are a large number 
of what one of the pages calls "nits" — a term both de- 
scriptive as to ability and personality. The "nits," how- 
ever, arc never heard of except — if on the Republican 
side — they forget to provide a job for some constituent, 
who tells his tale of woe again and again in the favorite 
gathering place in said Assemblyman's district, and so 
they do little harm, except drawing their pay. The 
San Francisco delegation— well, they are all here, and for 
obvious reasons are bunched up together on the left-hand 
side of the Assembly chamber. The country members 
have among them a number of reformers, who, with their 
panaceas in the shape of legislation for social, financial, 
and other evils, will have to be tolerated, because they 
were elected, till the end of the session. 

Frank L. Coombs, of Napa, was elected Speaker, and 
will make an efficient one. S. J. Duckworth, Chief Clerk 
of last session, was chosen to succeed himself. 

The youngest member, and one of the ablest, is A. W. 
North, of Yolo, who will make a record for himself. 

Later, I will send you some photographs and something 
about some of the more prominent of our law-makers. 

Peg. 

The Patriarchs' Ball. 
This u] tra-fashionable affair was removed Ibis year from Deltrjonico 
to the Waldorf, and was exceptionally magnificent. The toilets 
were superb, the music sublime, and the menu a masterpiece of 
culinary art, interspersed witb claret, Moet & Cbandon champagne 
and Jobannis "Water. 



The latest and most elegant things in gent's furnishing goods are 
to be had of John "W. Oarmany. 25 Kearny St. 



yf first chapter of a series ™ 

§ Infancu & Childhood ^ 

, By Frances Fisber Wood 

1 Debutantes' Receptions 

flShuloGko. the Sand 
Hills 

Story by Er,r a W Psattie 

Fashions for the Outdoor 

Woman, Skatlaij Costumes, 

Fur Wrapt, etc. 

In the Vol. 3G. No. 

Issue 

{Dated Jan. 2) 

of 



HARPER'S BAZAR. 



I0c. a Copu 



$4 a Year 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1S97. 





■ We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Afoore. 



DURING the first performance of -I 
Paris Tragedy, when Loie Fuller kicked 
off her little number six slippers, and turned 
over on the divan, and snuggled close in her 
white silk nightie, and went to sleep again, 
I said to my companion: "If you have 
tears, prepare to shed them now. 
I foresaw Miss Fuller's finish. 

Learning that Mr. Peter Robertson was to take La 
Loie in hand, and cut her pantomime to the dimensio 
thirty minutes, I waited writing until I bad 

ce. This happened on Saturday afternoon, and 
I felt then as 1 had felt before, that Miss Fuller's part of 
Madame, in .1 Paris Tragtdy, could be better acted by 
anv fifteen -per-week actress from Morosco's or the Alca- 
Mr. Robertson's editing merely curtails the time il 
takes Loie Fuller to show an audience the sort of a stage 
lady she would have been without the illuminated petti- 
coats. 

I am too sincere an admirer of Loie Fuller's genius in 
silk and calcium not to deplore this dull, sickening thud 
upon an art that defies her at every point. SI 
neither the facile gesture, nor the fleet, fluent facial ex- 
ion, nor yet the gift of alert, suggestive magnetism 
for legitimate pantomime. Even in her own sphere of the 

e she shows little, if any, personality : there is . 
mend' lion art power which moulds mechanism 

into glorious dance-pictures, giving them the throb of life 
and color of all radiant nature; but little of the artiste - 

mality is felt with these. Loie Fuller is to her di 
verv much what Augu.stin Daly is to Ada Rehan — and. I 
daresay, in pantomime quite as strange and woeful a 
as Mr. Daly would be playing the part of Viola, 
in Twelfth Sight. 

Miss fuller used to instruct the crities. Now the 
critics will breathe some mild, pedantic whispers to Miss 
Fuller. .1 Pari* Tragtdy is programmed "from the 
French." 1 advise Miss Fuller to keep it as far from 
France as possible. She does not act in French. Carry- 
ing coals to Newcastle is a lucrative business compared 
with carrying this quality of pantomime to Paris. 
» * * 

When I am an old, old man, with dangling whiskers and 
doddering anecdotes, every season or two will find me 
hobbling toward a performance of Tht tit, I Bnmf stead, and 
writing a paragraph about it afterwards. Of this I feel 
sure. Trilliy may be buried a thousand fathoms deep, 
Uhcli Tom's Cabin pass into peaceful oblivion, and Bern- 
hardt grow middle-aged, but that dear, old, till-doomsday 
classic of the barnyard will jog on forever. Fleshy prob- 
lems have come and gone, flaring melodramas have burned 
themselves out. kid gloved melodrama has sprung a re- 
naissance on us under the polite euphemism of "romantic' 
without securing permanency for any one play, farce- 
comedy and hair-oifed boarding-house society drama are 
vanquished in a season — but Tin Old Homestead, incontest- 
ably commonplace, uncompromisingly obvious, and irre- 
deemably pure, skips lightly over the graves of it 
te ..poraries, and year by year welcomes a new posterity. 

I cannot tell you why this play lives, why it has survived 
twenty changes of cast, and now, in the hands of inglorious 
road players entertains you and me at the Baldwin 
Theatre. I used to know when I was wiser and younger. 
but somehow I must give it up now. It would be infinitely 
easier for me to write why Ibsen (of whom I know com- 
paratively little) is not popular in England, than why 
Thompson (whose play I know backwards) is toreverlast- 
Ingly a success in America. Not hearing any clamors for 
Ibsen exegesis, I will return to Tin Old Homestead, which 
has already helped mc over considerable space on a dull 
theatrical week. The old play takes on no fine citified 
airs because it is playing at the Baldwin. The double 
quartette sings well, and the cast throughout is most con- 
vincingly rural and ecor.o.nical. 



Charles Wayne is the particular, transcendent 
luminary of the "four new features on the Orpheum bill. 
He does not say this himself; he is modestly typed as a 
"premier ecet-ntrique" — but don't mind that. Mr. Wayne 
ich amazingly complicated legs that it would be im- 
possible to 1 n in anv language but French. How- 
- are only the beginning of his fascinations; 
mg, jests jovially, and his person is dainty 
and picturesque. He was once in comic opera, but when 
that business fell into the hands and feet of tumblers and 
contortionists, he reformed, and went into vaudeville. The 
transmogritie.il ion is perfect: now he articulates in under- 
standable English, his gags belong to this end of the cen- 
tury, and his pyrotechnic dancing is full of novel figures. 
Charles Wayne' :- tertaining person from the top 
of his beaver down. 

I am disappointed in Hallen and Fuller. In abridging 
and modifying their skit to what they trustfully belie 
the level of an Orpheum bit, tbey have landed low— leav- 

i fact, very little that is either new or diverting. 
ortive tailoring is just as smart and refreshing 
as it was in his palmv farce-comedy days, and Mollie 
Fuller soubrettes in the old. usual way, and they both sing 
and dance airily in conventional music hall style. But 
somehow I expected more of their fifteen minutes— a brisk 
duel in repartee, an infectious song or two, and a real new 
joke — and 1 didn't get it. 

The Two Bostons are redeemed by the cleverness of 
their trained dogs. In the tongue of a more refined Bos- 
ton, they are not worth beans without them. Bar the 
dancing of the longer and leaner, which is a good bit of 
■ roles, ue wink, their fun is loud, coarse and obesely 
British: one line in particular is too stupidly and candidly 
1 even for vaudeville. But the dogs are chaste and 
r, and well worth seeing, even at the expense of 
listening to their masters. 



I missed hearing Miss Caldwell's songs, but I caught 
r and his band in the act of playing some Faust 
music. It was beautifully done. He's a great little man, 
that Rosner; ho has address, and piquancy, and magnet- 
md authority, and humor, and circumstance, and 
lots of other things which most variety leaders have not. 
■ * # * 

Joseph Murphy was at home, being ill, when I called at 
the Columbia Theatre Tuesday night to se j Sluiun Jihue, 
and In played the part. It's a great thing 

to have a brother John — particularly if you are Joseph 
Murphy, and be looks like you to the very picture, and 
speaks the same rich, verdant I r i sir - American. A less con- 
scientious management than that of the Columbia would 
have made a deep send of .Iocs illness, and then John 
would have had a week of being not only Larry Donovan, 
but. his millionaire brother besides, for. outside the pockets, 
they are as alike as two peas. But Mr. Friedlander was 
over in Oakland Tuesday night, and Mr. Gottlob would 
not hear of the deception when I proposed it. So some- 
body made a speech, and John went on as plain John, and 
served Larry up in choice, Irish style. There are 
lots of good democrats in the cast: Mr." Sheehan, Mr. 
Daley. Mr. Gorrein. and Miss Farrel; and what the others 
lack in nativity they make up in simulation. 

AsllToN SlKVKNS. 
» * » * * 

Tlu o/./ //,„». »■/,.!,/ runs another week at the Baldwin. 
with an extra performance on Sunday night. A big musical 
sensation is on for the week following: Lillian Nordica, in 
company with Sofia Scalchi, Baron Bertrald. J. C. Demp- 
sey. and Luckstone. the pianist, will give a series of three 
concerts. An act of Siegfried, one of Favst, and a scene 
from another opera (it is to be hoped Wagnerian), are to 
be sung in costume, besides miscellaneous song readings. 
It is possible that Hinrichs and the symphony orchestra 
will be engaged for these concerts. 

The Orpheum promises a big musical novelty next week, 
in the Royal Hungarian Court Orchestra, which comes 
direct frim Europe under thedirection of Matu>. Lieut, 
ventriloquist, will also be a new attraction. Xew 
marches and new arial gyratious are being rehearsed bv 
the ballet. ' 



January 9, 1897. 



FRANC 



Tbi- ih Murpbj -own- 

ing. Listen to what ho - 
::bia: 
So Ion* •- 1 : i-li plajl shall ronlinur 10 tUnel the »tt«v 
irbo Ifve Hie snug little hUod i«i Ihn • 
Channel, jasl so hrog «ill Kcrrj '.'.... . with Jowpa UurphjruDu 
O lllra. reMin 1M rvergrren tr. lU thrillinicly atl 

The Irish Muksmltb maj show hs- 
InierTlaws bis sweetheart's lather, nlghl after night, until thi 
woman" upsets the habit atnl stlM a memory; he 

may make horseshoes and put them onto the bona until motor 
vehicles annihilate the equine species; and be ma; Mod his trained 
■ irrier pigeons (rom the race track to the Prew (arm, until Old Erin 
abandons the j muting <-.tr K»r the trolley ami its tracks ol -*te<-l ; but 
It to doubtful If ever be Sods an audience thai tire? ol the >t<>ry. its 
songs, its dances, and its delightful scenery. 

Jack's beanstalk has taken on another week's growth. 
An influx of new sotijjs. dances, ami specialties bids fair to 
keep it green and growing in the Tivoli for several weeks 
to come. Jade and the Btaautalk is now in the smoothest 

running order; the many spectacular features are skill- 
fully handled and most of the cast has improved siuce the 
opening week. West's Irishwoman and Little .lack 
Robertson's Puck are big hits, and of course Hatttnan is 
enjoyiDg boundless popularity. 

The Rev. Haskett Smith. M. A., author of numerous 
entertaining volumes of travel in the Holy Land, is at 
present lecturing at the Y. M. C. A. Hall, on the Orient. 
The lectures are illustrated by magnificent pictures and 
views, and the entertainments are proving exceedingly 
popular. The Rev. Smith will yive his last lecture next 
Monday night on "Egypt." The lectures are delightful, 
and well worth listening to. 



MERITED RECOGNITION. 




George S . Fletcher. 



l_ ment Clubs of this city 
have done so much good 
for their respective dis- 
tricts as that of Point 
Lobos. The club consists 
of energetic gentlemen who 
are determined to make 
the Richmond District one 
of the most beautiful in the 
city. How much they have 
accomplished will be seen 
when one compares the 
Richmond District of to- 
day with that of a few 
years ago. The officers of 
the club, however, say that 
to George R. Fletcher, 
their untiring President, is 
due the greater part of 
the praise for all that has 
been accomplished. He 



has twice held this important position, and a few nights 
ago he received a most handsome diamond badge in recog- 
nition of his valuable services and leadership. Did every 
improvement club in this city have such a leader, San 
Francisco would be the gainer. 

The Overland Limited, 

ONLY 3]4 DAYS TO CHICAGO. 4% DAY8 TO NEW YORK. 

The Union Pacific is the only line running vestibuled Pullman 
Double Drawing-room Sleepers and Dining Cars daily. San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago without change. Vestibuled buffet smoking and 
library cars between Ogden and Chicago. Upholstered Pullman 
Sleepers, San Francisco to Chicago, without change, daily. Steam- 
ship tickets on sale to and from all points in Europe. For tickets 
and sleeping car reservations apply to D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



If you have not been to Leona Heights yet, you have missed one 
of the prettiest of excursions. Commodious cars run there from 
all parts of Oakland and Alameda. The round trip is only fifty 
cents and as there is no bar on the grounds no roughs ever resort 
there of a Sunday. 

The Rio Grande Western Railway and connections are offering 
low rates and superior accommodations to all points East. Before 
purchasing tickets, call at 14 Montgomery street. 

W. H. Skedakee, General Agent. 



St. Denis' 



M V, VORK 

■ 

I l ROPI \N I'l \N 



P*t day and Upward*. 

»rr few 
than the 



RfjMM 

In * 

■ 

m readily 
■ 

■ 
■ 
WILLIA H TAYLOR & SON. 

olumbia I neatre- Kn.-ihm.i.r..;. lmVw.; 

and Managers 

lb". lefltlmala CrUb iSBPB 

mi ni'in . rrUt . 

0*1 Ol JriMi 

KERRY GOW, 

played by him with imp. oeai i u B H the principal 

1 Air.'- ol Amei ■ oorni 

without an equal ' Presenting doi ooly realistic pictures ol 

land .iiiminrv i*ih- "TbeDevire Annum." 



Baldwin Theatre- 



AL. Hayman & Co., (Iocorporatcd) 

Proprlutors. 

Regular performance Sunday evening Now in its last nlgbts. 
Remaining for next week onlj , Denman Thompson's 

" THE OLD HOMESTEAD, 

Selecl company of 33 players. The great double Quartette. 

Novel elcuirical effeots. Last performance Sunday January 

i:th Beginning Tuesday, Jim. iBih: Lillian Nukiuca oper- 
atic concerts. 



Manager 



T' ,_|! r*\„_. . H«..««. Mas. Ernestine Kreling 
IVOII Upera llOUSe. Proprietor and Ma. 

Next week, the SECOND EDITION of 

cJAGK AMD THE BEANSTALK. 

The King, the Queen, Jack, the Cow, the Giant, the Fairies, the 
Goddesses, the Mortals. 

New songs! New dances! New skits! Seats now on sale. 
Next opera— THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 
Popular Prices 25o and 50o 

0^«U rt .,«« San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 
1 PricUm. street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Week commencing Monday, January lith. 
the famous royal 



Direct from Europe, 



HUNGARIAN GOURT ORCHESTRA, 

Under the direction of P. K. Matus, the most lamed clarionet 
virtuoso in all Europe. Another European novelty, Lieutenant 
Noble, Europe's ^reaiest ventriloquist; Hallen &'Fuller, Chas. 
Wayne, Annie Caldwell, the two Bostons, Abachi & Masand; 
continued success of Nilsson's aerial ballet audKiralfy's grand 
opera ballet; new costumes, new scenery, new marches. 
The famous Hungarian Orchestra will play in the Orpheum 
Annex eve-y evening after the performance in the theatre. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Matinee Prices : Parquet, any seat, 25o. ; balcony, any seat, 10c. ; 
children, 10c . any part. 



The only perfect winter race track in 
America 



Ingleside Track, 

PACIFIC COAST dOGKEY CLUB. 

Racing from December 28th to January 9th, inclusive, Five or 
more races daily, rain or shine; first race at 2 p. m. 
Take Southern Pacific trains at Third and Townsend streets 
depot, leaving at One o'clock p. m. Fare for round trip, includ- 
ing admission to grounds, $1. Take Mission street electric line 
direct to track. 

The P^rumery Sec Slakes, Tuesday. Deoember 29th; the Cali- 
fornia Oaks, Thursday, December 31st; the Shrieve & Co. Cup, 
Friday. January 1st. 
W S. Leake, Secretary. A. B. Ppreckels, President. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 



819 Market street 



[}R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Office and Residence: 409^ Post St.. San Francisco. 
Office Hours: 9 to 13 A. M.; 1 to 5 p. m. 



Dentist. 



NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of Interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates In first-class comp-vnles. or grain sold, 
If desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California B«nk 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



AN ARCHITECTURAL TRIUMPH. 

OX E of the most pleasing evidences of San Francisco's 
progress is the building of stone residences instead of 
those of frame. True, we have many superb houses con- 
structed of redwood, but. architecturally speaking, they 
are unsatisfactory. No matter how elaborate they may 
hey lack the substantial appearance of either stone 
or brick structures. The departure of W. P. Whittier is 
a commendable one, and his recently completed home 
will for a long time be a pride to the city. It is located at 
the corner of Jackson and Laguna streets, high on the 
slope of the hill, and its rear windows command the broad 
sweep of the bay. Built of red sand-stone, on a founda- 
tion of lighter hue, and roofed with dark red tiles, remin- 
iscent of old mission days, it appears massive in contrast 
to its wooden neighbors, yet every detail of curves, cor- 
nices, windows, and ornamentations, are pleasing to the 
eye. The marble entrance leads to an interior in keeping 
with the outward magnificence. The house will long stand as 
a monument to the ability of the architect, Edward R. 
Swain. His success in this instance marks the beginning of 
a new era in San Francisco architecture. 

To obtain soft outlines and artistic 
Sandstone as an decoration is impossible with wooden 
Aid to Art. materials, and even with most varie- 
ties of stone, but in the Arizona Red 
Sandstone a quality of texture is presented which admits 
of the most delicate carving. The architect has taken full 
advantage of this quality to give expression to his finest 
decorative conceptions. The warm, rich color of the stone 
is so uniform that no streaks or blotches mar the beauty 
of the structure. The Whittier building is a source of 
pride to Clinton J. Hutchins, agent of the Arizona Sand- 
stone Company, whose offices are at the Builders' Ex- 
change. The Arizona Sandstone Company is one of the 
most enterprising in this particular line of business, and 
has done much toward beautifying this city by the con- 
struction of handsome edifices. 

One of the difficulties in building on our 

Cutting Down hills is the securing of a proper grade. 

a Hill. The Whittier lot was admirably prepared 

for the foundation by contractors Warren 

A- Malley, who at present are grading and leveling the site 

of the old Bay District race track, and also filling in the 

Fair estate property at Harbor View. 

No residence in these days can lay 
Art and Utility in full claim to elegance unless its ap- 
Modem Appliances, i lianees possess the highest degree 
of art and beauty, in addition to 
their necessary utility. In this respect, the Whittier home 
stands without an equal. The.!. L. Mott Iron Works of 
New York, reputed leaders in their line, furnished all the 
bath-tubs, porcelain lined, and artistically decorated with 
various designs; the lavatories made of Italian statuary 
marble; their celebrated jet "Primo" water closets; deco- 
rated Cauldon China Basins, and Bidets' and Imperial 
Porcelain Ware for the kitchen sinks, and laundry tubs. 
In fact, these details are perfect. The New York firm 
has an office and show room. No. 27 Flood building, where 
M. S. James, their Pacific coast representative, is ever 
ready to show their goods. 

Footsteps should be saved in large houses. 
A Residence This mansion is provided with a passensrer 
Elevator. elevator, installed by the Cahill & Hall 
Elevator Compary, of 214 Mission street. 
It is a hydraulic ram elevator, noiseless and smooth run- 
ning, and though primarily intended for passenger service, 
is of sufficient capacity to raise pianos and furniture. The 
firm has a number of similar elevators in other prominent 
residences. 

No small responsibility rests upon the 
Glory of painter of magnificent houses. The 

Rich Coloring, conception and application of rich col- 
oring and delicate tints, with full re- 
gard to harmonious effect is, in the Whittier house, a de- 
cided compliment to the ability of Thomas Downing, of-615 
Mission street. 

The interior woodwork is probably the lead- 

Eiegant ing evidence of luxurious finish, and illus- 

Woodwork. trates the high class of work turned out bv 

Fink & Schindler, of 1309-1315 Market St. 




JOHN PARTRIDGE, 



306 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
San Francisco. 



STATIONER, PRINTER, AND BOOKBINDER. 

Now is the time to order BOOKS for the New Year. Tel. Main 614. 
Phintino Departmknt: «-n Steuart street. 

BRIEFS. CATALOGUES, PRICE LISTS. NEWSPAPERS, 
Day or night work. Twelve printing presses at your disposal. 
No trouble to make estimates 



REMOWAL.. 



a MACONDRAY 2c CO. 

Importers Teas, Mattings and Silks. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 

Agents North China Insurance Company (Limited), 

Have removed to 

116 California Street, San Francisco, Gal. 

The Banjo. 

flshton P. Stevens, 

STUDIO: 36 Montgomery street, 
Room 8. Pupils prepared (or Stage, 
Concert, or Drawing Room. A Specia 
Class for 
teachers who wish to perfect themselves In the Banjo's harmony and technlc 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Spring Valley Water Worki. 

The annual meeting ol the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will be held at 12 o'clock m. on 

WEDNESDAY, the 13th DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the office or the President of the company, 508 California street, San 
Francisco, for the election of Trustees and for the transaction of such othei 
business as may come before the meeting 

FELHAM W. AMES, Secretary. 
Office: No. 50 3 Califo rnia street, San Francisco. Cal 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pacific Auxil- 
iary Fire Alarm Company will be held at the office of the company, room 
14, 2.'6 Bush street, San Francisco. Cal., on 

TUESDAY, the 19th DAY OF JANUARY, 1837, 
at the hour of 11 o'clock a m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
ling year, and for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. w HANSON, Secretary. 

Office: 2i6 Bush street. San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting ot the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada 
Silver MiulngCompany will be held at the office of the company, room U 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal., on 
WEDNESDAY, the *>TH DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the hour of i o'clock r. m.. for the election of a Board of Trustees to 
serve for the ensuing year aud the transaction of such other business as 
may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, 
January 18. 1897, at 3 o'clock iv m. 

San Francisco. January ■->. 1897. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office: Room 14, Nevada Block, 300 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. 




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January <>, 1897. 



SAX T-R \VS 1.1. I 





*HK old kdl 

.1 ill wind that 
blows nobinly pood. This seems to be excmplilied ii 
fact that the buds ar. .itinp themselves so heart 

ily over the marriage of Miss l.mma Sprockets, because ii 

emoved that eharmiog, heavily-dowered young lady 
from the ranks of belledom, and thus left more oham 
their own conquests. Now that Miss Spreckels hi 
come a bride, there remain but two very rich California 
heiresses — Miss Fair and Mi-s Flood. The former has 
turned her pretty back upon S;in Francisco in favor of 
New York, and the latter (say her intimate friends) has 
given up society, and intends to lead a life of single 

dness for aye. Weddings, however, continue in our 
fashionable world. Miss Lizzie Carroll and Will Wbittier 
have decided upon February for their wedding, and that 
of Mis- Alice Ames and Arthur Allen will come soon after. 
If rumor may be relied upon, there will be another wed- 
ding in the Boardman family ere long, the bride a popular 

belle. 

* * * 

Sad, pearly tears are bedimming the eyes of some of 
our fairest women of society that handsome Colonel Lovell 
has departed for Philadelphia without so much as engag- 
\-g himself to one of them. " The dear Colonel" has been 
voted one of the " best catches of the season," and many 
a pretty belle has had delightful dreams in which he 
figured as a loving bridegroom. And now, for some 
unexplained cause, he has suddenly departed for the East 
without fixing any date for his return ! It has been whis- 
pered, since his departure — that a previous engagement 
made in Philadelphia, with Miss Gussie Van Tonne, the 
wealthy banker's daughter and heiress, bound the "dear 
Colonel's " heart and affections to such an extent that he 
was prevented from succumbing to the luring charms and 
languishing sighs of our dainty belles. Possibly the good 
Gods will, in a pitying mood, send another Adonis to re- 
place Colonel Lovell, in the hearts and affections of the 

disappointed darlings. 

* * * 

The guests at the Hotel Rafael are unanimous in declar- 
ing that never were holidays more delightfully spent than 
were those at that charming place. Cosey fireside stories, 
agreeable card parties, delicious fare, and congenial com- 
panionship, made the time pass swiftly by, and the Christ- 
mas and New Year jollities were thoroughly enjoyed by all. 

* * * 

There is a whisper in the air that one of the features oE 
this season will be the bachelors' ball, to be given at one of 
the large halls by the men of society as a compliment to 
their lady friends. That it will be a brilliant success, 
should the whisper prove true, goes without saying. 

* * * 

The last fad among our girls is "spouting"— in other 
words, the pretty creatures have taken furiously to 
theatricals, and if the craze continues, society may reason- 
ably look for some amateur performances, possibly for a 
pet charity, before the winter is over. 

* * * 

Dame Rumor asserts most positively that the venerable 
beau, W. Scott Jones, is seriously considering taking unto 
himself a wife— a very charming lady, whose social 
triumphs began at the nation's capital many years ago. 

* * * 

The new army beaux of the Third Artillery are proving 
very popular in the swim, and, the girls say. are all good 
dancers. The next Fortnightly will test the powers of 
these martial heroes, as it is to be an army and navy cotil- 
lion. ^_ 

Japanese curios are sought after the whole world over but in no 
place can such rare ones be obtained as in San Francisco. The 
visitor to the store of G. T. Marsh & Co., 625 Market Street, will ob- 
tain the best obtainable at very reasonable prices. The store is well 
worth a visit. 




HflTHe 
-WORLD 




Going out of 
Business. 

Commencing Honday, Jan. 4th 

^—$125,000 

CL0AK5, 
SUITS, etc. 

The entire stock to be sold during next ?0 
days at a TREMENDOUS SACRIFICE. 

ARrlAND CAILLEAU, 

Cor. Geary St. and Grant Ave. 



Egyptian enamel 



The most perfect beautifler the world has ever known; it 
instantly transforms the sallowest complexion into one of 
peerless beauty, and imparts the natural freshness and 
bloom of youth; itdefles detection, will not rub olT, lasts all 
day, and is perfectly harmless. Endorsed by prominent 
physicians . Price. 50 cents and $1 : large size sent prepaid 
to any part of the United States or Canada on receipt of 
price. Manufactured only by 

131 POST STREET, 



MPS. M. J. Bllll6r San Francisco, CaL.U. S 

Army and Navy Glut) 



Is the only 



.WHISKEY 



on the market, every package of which bears 
an affidavit guaranteeing it to be absolutely 
PURE and over SIX YEARS OLD. 



MtYERFELD, MITCHELL 5c CO,, 

116 FRONT St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Gomel) Oolong. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



A Book William Wornum, the narrator of this story, 
of is a son of the village tailor, a law prac ti- 

the Week.* tioner in the Superior Courts of Oconee 
County, and the brother of Jane. William 
tells of the simple life of his native village in a pleasant 
sympathetic manner, and keeps the reader's interest un- 
flagging until he is swept into the matrimonial net and 
L'ht to the end of his memoirs. "Sister Jane " is a 
hard-featured, quick-tempered, sharp-tongued woman, 
with few of the charms of the sex, except the inconsis- 
tency that never deserts it. Yet she has an honest heart 
withal, and forms shrewd and for the most part correct 
judgments about her neighbors and acquaintances, who 
stand in considerable awe of her. Free Betsey, the enfran- 
"man who tells fortunes by the cards, 
Grandsire Johnny Roach, Uncle Jimmie Cosby, the revival- 
ist preacher, full of stirring words, and Jincy, the lover 
of birds, squirrels, and every furred and feathered thing 
that dwells in the woods— all these are quaint characters, 
drawn with graphic and artistic touch. Mary Bullard is 
a charming girl, with whom William has been on intimate 
terms ever since they were boy and girl together. 
William, however, is a slow lover, and it takes him a pro- 
vokingly long time to discover that he is over head and 
ears in love with Mary. Hut at last he takes the plunge, 
makes a declaration, and is at once accepted. Colonel 
Bullard, the great landowner of the village, and Mrs. 
Bullard, his wife, are the most shadowy figures of the 
Story; and people accustomed to the lines of demarcation 
in British society will wonder how an uncommonly pretty 
and attractive girl, daughter of a Colonel and man of 
property and social standing, could possibly be on terms 
of the greatest intimacy with the son and daughter of the 
tailor of their own \illage. We do not know where 
Oconee county is, bat evidently the social distinctions of 
that region are few and inconsiderable, and are, doubtless, 
correctly | by Mr. Harris. Some exciting 

events happen in the village: a child is lost, the Colonel's 
brother becomes a wanderer over the face of the earth, 
pulling up at last in California — that wild and woolly 
legion to which the Easterner sends all his scapegraces. 
The brother and the lost child meet and become fast 
friends; later, they turn up in their old home, the one a 
rich man and the other a handsome boy. The story is 
well told, and the author evidently understands the kind 
of life he pictures for us. The volume, like all issued from 
the Riverside Press, is accurately and clearly printed, 
and the cover is pretty and tasteful. 

* Sister Jaur, Hit Friends and Acquaintances, a narrative of cer- 
tain events and episodea transcribed from the papers of the late 
William Wornum by Joel Chandler lUrris. Boston and New York. 
Houghton, MiiHm and Company. 1896 Price*! GO. 

Mrs. Earle, in the course of investigations lor her books 
on colonial history, found it necessary to ransack main 
old diaries, family histories, and court records. Tims 
she 8 iilerable quantity of notes that 

were not used in any of her published volumes. Sui 
these notes as refer to the quaint (and happily now ob- 
solete) punishments in vogue in former days, she has col- 
lected in this book, which she dedicates to "All curious 
and ingenious gentlemen and gentlewomen who can gain 
from acts of the past a delight in the present days of 
virtue, wisdom and the humanities." Scattered thi 
the volume are curious illustrations,, printed on pi 
ment-like paper in brown ink. showing the bilboes, the 
stocks, the ducking stool, the pillory, and othi 
instruments of ad torture. These illustra- 

tions are not so bad as one might infer from the name of 
designer— one Hazenplug. We shou'd like I sor. 
Anna Shaw and some Others of her tribe to be treated to 

the same punishment as Ann Boulder, who. mm- about 
the year 1652, was ordered "to stand in irons hair ai 
with a paper on her breast marl cIPubijck Dbstro 
Peace." And we think it would do the Rev. < - 
Brown, D, D., (/'■■ rfrus. or ten times da: 



good to be made to walk round Union Square barefooted, 

inly in his shirt, and carrying a large faggot in his 

' At any rate, if it did him no good, it 

would make us "feel good" to see him thus doing 

public penance. 

Curious Punishments of Bygone Days, by Alice Morse Earle. 
Chicago. Herbert 8. Stone and Co. 1896. 

At the exhibition of the Book and News trade in 
London in October of last year the Macmillan Company 
was awarded the gold medal for general excellence in 
book manufacture, including printing, illustrating, binding 
etc. The firm, which originated, we believe, in the Eng- 
lish University town of Cambridge, now has houses in 
London and New York, and also in Australia. Lately the 
firm has published two handsome volumes on "The Castles 
of England, their story and structure," illustrated with 
full-page plates and many smaller pictures. Owing to 
the facts that no foreign foe has for many centuries ef- 
fected a landing on English soil, and that there has been 
no civil war since the struggle between the Cavaliers and 
the Roundheads, the mediteval castles of England are in 
splendid preservation. Windsor, Arundel, Warwick, 
Belvoir, Shirbum, and many others, have been lived in 
continuously since they were built, and form the most 
picturesque and delightful residences thatcan be imagined. 
Out of the six hundred .stone castles of England five hun- 
dred remain to the present day, and this sumptuous work 
aims at recording all that is known about them. The 
first volume of the work was to have been brought out in 
November, 1N!I6', but we have not yet seen it. These 
volumes include only the castles of England; those of 
Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, will be treated of in other 
books. The wealth of associations and romantic incidents 
gathered about these historic castles is astonishing; a 
single grand stronghold like that of Warwick is worth a 
whole continent like Australia. To know the lives of its 
various owners is to know a large part of the history of 
England. 

In an article entitled "The Brewing of the Storm" in 
the December issue of The Forum, Professor Goldwin 
Smith makes some valuable comments on the late Presi- 
dential election. Among other things he says that the 
great immigration of poor laborers into the United States 
has tended to produce two clearly marked classes, that of 
capitalist employers, and that of factory workers. The 
latter are naturally discontented, and, under the influence 
of agitators, become the easy victims of socialistic and 
anarchistic schemers of all kinds. Protectionism is res- 
ponsible for another batch of evil consequences. Capital- 
ists of all sorts learn to look on the public exchequer as a 
vast grab-bag, out of which everyone tries to get as 
large a share as possible; workpeople learn to look to 
legislation, and not to their own skill and industry, to 
raise their wages. When a hundred different branches of 
industry are protected, the silver producer cannot see 
why his industry should be unprotected; accordingly he 
besieges the doors of the legislative halls, clamoring for a 
measure compelling the nation to buy his silver at twice 
its market value. Hosiers, batters, grocers, bootmakers, 
briekmakers. dealers and manufacturers of all kinds join 
in the scramble. All this confusion of ideas is worse con- 
founded by men like Henry George and Edward Bellamy, 
who. without political, economical, logical or other train- 
ing, scatter broadcast over the land the wildest notions 
and the most reckless dogmas. 

A second edition of the late John Tyndall's "Glaciers of 
the Alps'' has been issued by Messrs Longmans, Green & 
Co. It is a charming book, written in a simple and 
lid style that makes even difficult things plain. Pro- 
fessor Tyndall was an enthusiastic and adventurous 
mountain climber, whose observations on glaciers and 
formation will be interesting to any person who lives 
in a country where glacial effects are to be seen, and will 
give him a clearer idea than he ever had before of their 
origin. 

The Christmas Herald, published by Hugh Murphy and 

Frank P. Scully of this city, is a bright little paper, full of 

reading matter eminently suitable for the family 

The Christmas number, consisting of twenty-four 

pages, was well worth the small price asked for it. 



January 9, 1897. 



FRANCISCO V 







BOHEMIAN UPS AND DOWNS.-un runt's w*sw*gto*. 



■ \1T A Y up in a garret high 



ust a few feet from the sky. 

Pwell I in Bohemia. 
What eare I for aught below" 
There have I nor friend nor foe! 
I'ity I the Struggling throng 
While I live my life of song 

Dp here in Bohemia, 

Tween my teeth my briar-root— 
Best of friends, since almost mute— 

Itare thing in Bohemia; 
Ipward as the thick smoke curls 
What care i for simp'ring girls? 
Love is weak; my pipe is strong; 
Why for love, then, be the song 

Sung here in Bohemia? 

Oft my little songs fall flat, 
Hungry? What rare I for that, 

Fasting in Bohemia? 
Put my only coat in pawn, 
Live on that and still sing on ; 
Puff my pipe and think I've dined— 
Barniecidal feasts I find 

Often in Bohemia. 

Haply then my rhymelets take, 
With a check my fast to break, 

Feast we in Bohemia, 
'Round the corner of the block, 
Sign o'erhead a crowing cock, 
Mug of beer and sandwich fine ; 
What care we how nabobs dine, 

Feasting in Bohemia? 

Friends have I, some three or four— 
Quite enough, for who has more 

In or out Bohemia? 
With them joy is always young, 
Grief is but a song that's sung ; 
Live we, laugh we debonair, 
Skies are bright and winds are fair 

Always in Bohemia! 



AFTERWARDS-— john £. healy, in London weekly sun. 

Did I love you, little girl, 

Once in other days? 
Was the world the place wherein 

All the golden ways 
Led to you, and all the birds 

Only sang your praise? 

Did I loveyou, little girl? 

Was it you whose eyes, 
Twice a dozen months ago, 

Lit the Arcadian skies 
Where we walked with summer-time, 

Happy and unwise? 

Did I love yoa, little girl? 
Are you sure 'tis true? 
Was it for your shrine I plucked 

Ro3emary and rue? 
Was my pastoral queen of love 
You— and only you? 

Did I love you, little girl, 

Not so long ago? 
Can such sudden ebb succeed 

Such a passionate glow? 
Still I dream of linked lips ; 

Tell me, was it so? 

Did you love me, little girl? 

Could such sorrow be? 
Have I locked your simple heart 

But to lose the key? 
God forgive me, little girl, 

If you weep for me! 




Head Golds, 



Catarrh, dry mucous membranes, soon yield to the 
treatment of the famous DR. MCKENZIE'S CA- 
TARRH CURE. 



BE CONVINCED FREE. 



To show that Dr. McKenzle's Catarrh Cure gives In- 
stant relief and continues to drive away the cold or 
catarrh, 7 free trials per week will be allowed you if 
you call at the 



Baldwin Pharmacy, 

(Edwin W. Joy), 
Market and Powell Sts. 



Call for free treatment of Dr. 
McKenzle's Catarrh Cure. 



You Must Look Neat. 



Suits Cleaned 
and Pressed 



$1.00 



Bau City Clothing Renovatoru, 



Suits called for and delivered. 



22V4 Geary St., Easterbrook B'ld'g, 
Rooms 19-20-21. 'Phone Grant 1S8 



WINDOW SHADES 
PAPER HANGING 
TINTING or 
FRESCOING. 



Jas. Duffy & 6o. 

20 GEARY ST. 

Estimates cheerfully given. 
Telephone Grant 39. 



Gray Bros., 



316 Montgomery Street, S. F. 

No. 205 New High St., Los Angelfa. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and 
Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

Schlllinger's Patent ] In all its branches 

Side Walk and Garden Walk a specialty." 

Office: 307 Montgomery street, (Nevada block) San Franclscc 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Company, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
General Agents 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 
HILLINGHAM CEMENT. 
3»7 flARKBT ST., C»rner Fremont, S. P. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 




A proposition is now under way at Yir- 
Draining the ginia City winch should merit the sup- 
American Flat, port of every one who deals in the local 

mining share market. Its success will 
mean the renewal of activity in the Nevada mines and in 
speculation in this city. The American Flat ledges, which 
were neglected in years gone by and submerged at tie 
water level in the craze for everything on the Comstock, 
are now attracting attention. Some of the leading men in 
the business are now determined to drain this wealthy dis- 
trict by extending the Sutro tunnel through the district at 
a depth of UNO feet, the distance to be covered being 
about a mile and a half. This would tap the old Rock 
Island, Baltimore and Knickerbocker ledges, which paid 
handsomely down to the water level, where the companies 
had to stop work failing the money necessary to put in the 
machinery required to handle the water. The right peo- 
ple are back of the enterprise now, and it will be hoped 
that the coming year will see the work well under way, 
and nearing its consummation. The absurdity of a policy 
which threw millions down the Comstock shafts, completely 
ignoring every other mineral deposit off the main lode, is 
now apparent, but it has taken a siege of dull times to 
convert the victims of a delusion which has cost them 
dearly. 

The mining fever is spreading badly in the 
California community, and if the dollars were pour- 
Gold Mines, ing in at the rate they are going down on 
paper, the town would be packed with the 
chariots of another batch of the newly enriched, while the 
beggars would do the grandee act on horseback. A fair 
sample of the rapid enhancement of mining values, and the 
enlarged ideas of the promotion class came under notice of 
local mining men during the past week. A new million 
dollar proposition cropped up in the street, batched in the 
fertile brain of a new arrival from over the border. Run- 
ning the game down, the owners were finally located, who 
held the property at 1700,000, a drop of $250,000 when the 
commissions were stripped off the deal. The property 
in question is a water-logged concern which could have 
been pulled in a year ago for $8000. The present owners 
obtained a working bond on it for $50,000, drained the 
ground and put up a mill. It is now awaiting the foreign 
tenderfoot, who can take the entire bakery for $700,000, if 
bought direct. This is a fair sample of the estimate 
placed upon the intelligence of the coming mine buyers, 
who, if posted on their business, must feel hightly flattered. 

Business in the mining market has 

The Pine Street, been dull during the holiday season. 

Market. Prices have been low, and the shares 

devoid of the buoyancy which attracts 
investors. The mines, however, hold their own remark- 
ably well. The last official letter from the Chollar-Bruns- 
wick Mine would have created a stir on the street some 
years ago. The high grade of ore opening up above the 
200-level is a surprise to the friends and supporters of the 
"streak and bunch " theory, which has destroyed the con- 
fidence of the public in the new find. The showing, in face 
of this unfriendly work of street-scalpers, is better than 
the Comstock ever made in its infancy, but this is over- 
looked by people who follow blindly any lead which hap- 
pens to suit their ideas for the time being. There is a 
prospect now for more activity in the market, and higher 
prices are anticipated by dealers in all the leading shares. 

IT is amusing to learn at this stage of the game that the 
old Kennedy mine is destined to outrank the Utica. It 
ought to have opened up a little better in its younger days 
to attain such a degree of eminence. At its depth, there 
might possibly be more millions in a sale if the right class 
of purchaser could be dug up. 

M ARK Sullivan, a well-known and capable young min- 
J 1 ing man of Madera County, has accepted the super- 
intendence of the Savannah Gold Mines at Grub Gulch. 



The following letter arrived in the last 

A Voice From Australian mail from Kalgoorlie. Itmay 

Westralia. interest some of our California readers in 

so far as the paragraph on the famous 

Comstock mine is concerned. The balance relating to the 

Paddington Consols will be Greek to most of the boys and 

girls on Pine street, although some may catch the point 

where it bears on Charley Kaufman: 

Minim; Editor News Lkttsb— As the mystery with which the 
Paddington Consols invest their property is becoming somewhat 
notorious on these fields, a short account of Mr. .las. C. Dwyer may 
enlighten Ihe public. 

I have learned that Mr. Dwyer first distinguished himself in the 
mining circles of California in the early '70s. Through the influence 
of Mr. Chas Patton, a director in the Yellow Jacket Company, Mr. 
Dwyer secured a contract to sink winzes, drive drifts, etc.. in the 
Yellow Jacket Mine, on the Comstock Lode. Mr. Dwyer fulfilled 
his contract in six months, clearing £9,000. In the process of his 
work he discovered the Yellow Jacket bonanza, and, according to 
his agreement with Patton, to give him alone information of the 
mine, he was enabled to purchase shares at low prices, and sell at 
the highest. He I bus cleared £00,000, while his friend protitnl to 
the extent of i -100,000. 

When the public knows tlus it has the key to the situation, which 
is that Mr. Kaufman could not have made Mr. Dwyer his manager 
unless manipulation was intended. Yours respectfully, 

I'll vs. H. Tayloe. 

Kalsoorlu, If. A., Nov. 10, 1896. 

The phenomenal financial growth of the 
A Prosperous Hibernia Savings and Loan Society con- 
Fmanciai Concern, tinues. Every annual report shows an 
increase in its assets, which have now 
reached a point close to $40,000,000, placing the bank in 
the front of financial institutions of its class in the world. 
The exact amount of its credits on December 31st last was 
$37,207,801.74. Of this sum no less than $26,190,549.14 is 
represented by promissory notes secured by first mort- 
gages on real estate, the bulk of which is city property. 
United States bonds of the value of $4,696,355.84 are held 
by the bank, and in addition $1,890,866.68 in miscellaneous 
bonds, consisting of such gilt-edged securities as Market- 
street Cable (is, Spring Valley i per cents, Sutter-street 
5 per cents, and Omnibus G per cents. The real property 
owned by the bank in the city and county of San Francisco 
is valued at $827,223, including the palatial office building 
of the corporation. The cash in its vaults amounts to 
3,342.95, exclusive of the reserve fund amounting to 
$2,682,099.12, The deposits in the Hibernia have largely 
increased during the past six months, showing the confi- 
dence reposed in its financial solidity and good manage- 
ment by the public. 

The members of the local Stock and 
Local Stocks in Bond Exchange continue to do a large 
Good Demand, business in the better class of securi- 
ties, showing that money is not scarce 
with investors. An attempt to boom the powder list on 
the strength of a reported combination, has fallen rather 
flat, owing to the fact that the public failed to appreciate 
the situation as delineated by the schemers at the back of 
the little job. While conferences have undoubtedly been 
held looking toward the consummation of a compact, they 
have been arranged entirely by the smaller companies who 
would not object to assistance from those who are better 
fixed financially than themselves. To arrange a compact 
of the kind, concessions will have to be made which are not 
altogether palatable to some of the concerns which, for all 
the business now going on, have enough to do to keep their 
heads above water. 

The extensive gold mountain known as 
Spskiyou Mine the Quartz Hill property at Scott Bar. 
Looming Up. Siskiyou County, has just been examined 
by a party of mining experts, who have 
carefully investigated its value and merit, and pronounced 
it one of the most extensive, if not the largest, gold-bear- 
ing quartz deposit in California, favorably located for 
working on a large scale; at least eighty stamps should be 
erected to begin crushing. M. F. Campbell, who was one 
of the party of experts that last season examined this 
mountain, has accompanied this last party as one of the 
experts. He found the cross-cut run into the mountain, 
showing new reserves, and felt highly pleased with the re- 
sults. Siskiyou count v can claim in Quartz Hill a most 
valuable property. 



January 9, 1897. 






«3 




" Hear IhoCripr :" 

"Onclh»t wlllpUT the (lev:.. «lr. with \ 



OWING to the fact tfa i1 
made the announcement 
" A Treat at M 
to pedestrians, and traffic 
in front of the Mission Stl 

spread among the free-lum itfa lightning 

ami the thoroughfare was blocked for ;i 1 

by a thirsty throng, a largi 

that way from the neighborhoo ol the < ity Hall. It was 

an unhappy error, and should not occur again, 

LAXGTRY. the somewhat soiled Jersey lily, has a hus- 
band who does not pi 
by a California divorce court, and who ii 

the assertion that he has been supp 

from the proceeds of his erstwhile companion's income as 

an actress who has basked in tin 

royalty. It is indeed unusual 10 record the fact 

San Francisco divorce suit is to be contested. Mr. 

Langtry's next move will be watched with interest. 

THE Reverend W. D. P. Bliss of Boston has delivered a 
lecture in choicest Bostonese at the Turk street 
''Temple," on "Socialism," the Reverend .T. E. Scott 
assisting in the entertainment. Surety we have ei 
preachers who do not preach, without importing them 
from the Hub or any other portion of the effete East. 
What we want is sweet surcease from such noisy divines 
as Will Do Politics Bliss and Jaw Exerciser Scott, We 
devoutly wish none others would apply. 

JAMES Patterson, Jr. has toyed with the X-ray, and 
now is a sadder and a wiser man. In his bubbling en- 
thusiasm for science, he has come near immolating himself 
upon the altar of his devotion to its experiments, and has 
succeeded in burning enough holes in himself to give him a 
slight idea of what the hereafter will do to sinners. There 
is really no need nowadays for a man to roast himself in 
this fashion. The dailies should not be deprived of their 
prerogatives. 

THE unfortunate falling out of Librarian Peterson, of 
the Oakland Free Library, with his better half, is 
much to be regretted. When men of sedentary occupa- 
tions come into conflict with their spouses, what is to be 
expected of men whose daily occupation leads them into 
the path of temptation — such as the clergy, the police, and 
the holy company of merchants ? Mr. Peterson should 
have kept his marital muddle a secret. 

TITH hungry look and itchiDg hand 
Bach new Assemblyman doth stand 
Beside the man who hold the sack ■- 
And hopes to bring a portion back. 
Not oft these fellows get a chance 
To till the pockets of their pan ts ; 
The sooner done, the sooner oer, 
Please God, they'll trouble then no more, 

HIS Excellency the Governor is to be congratulated up- 
on having delivered himself of so voluminous a mes- 
sage as that presented to our legislators at Sacramento. 
Whether these latter can read or not, and in most cases 
their ability to do so is questionable, a proof is given to the 
world that Mr. Budd can write. We may be taxed for the 
printing of the stuff, but that is only an item, after all 

SEVENTY-TWO applicants are clamoring for admis- 
sion to the legal bar of this State. It is now in order 
to increase our Almshouse accommodations at once. Pov- 
erty is no crime, and we cannot sit by unfeelingly and see 
our fellow beings starve, no matter how deeply we de- 
plore their lack of judgment. 
IT is not surprising that society girls should yearn for the 
exciting life that accompanies a stage career. The 
Town Crier's sympathy is wid 'em. Three pink teas and 
sky-blue-yellow luncheons would send him into delirium 
tremens, yet a girl is expected to endure such things and 
thrive, from season to season. 



W 



ft' 



lit the 

11, however, 

brethren will soon be 

it 1'it them- 



BKUM 01 ped from his 

1 tin- fields near Ingle 

during his absent ■•. and now 
og before breakfast. 
r in the rumor that I 
in training for the editorial 

m lb- is ei 1 a ted beyond the requirements of such 

a posil 

Til E ladies "f the Ed' ind Industrial tjnl 

ing arrangemei ar in a body before the 

at thi iven over to 

ijf their own sex for purification, Whether the 
m or nut remains to 

re ' : lei 1 1 are 63 ceedingly 

I upon 1 the brunt of the 

tcb fur the result, with expectancy. 

Ito be hope islature will not turn a deaf ear 

to the petition ol the workingmen of San Francisco 
bhej be ted free soap as an inducement 

for them to pet ir weekly ablutions. Mr. Sutro 

having kindly placed his baths at their disposal for one 
day in 11 < w, el,, we feel assured that the condition of the 
horny mouthed son of toil will be materially improved dur- 
ing the year l^MT. 

HV" F. Mann and his wife sought the friendly shel- 
ter of the Receiving Hospital this week for the salving 
of wounds received in a fight, over a pair of shoes, with a 
shoemaker. The toe of a boot has frequently done active 
service in altercations, andold shoes have from time imme- 
morial been the price of midnight slumbers, but the ap- 
pearance of footgear as a bone of contention smacks of 
novelty. 

THESE Mothers' Congresses that meet, 
Some methods new will teach, it may be, 
But all the same it's safe to say 

That in the old, old-fashioned way 
Their slippers will come into play 

When they proceed to spank the baby. 

IN case the boodle being distributed at Sacramento 
might prove too powerful a lodestone for the Town 
CitiEit, he has been chained to the News Letter safe 
(empty) and will not be granted his liberty until the last 
of our self-conscious Solons has retired to his inglorious 
hamlet to blow in his portion of ill-gotten gain. 

«N unfortunate street sweeper, who was run over by a 
team on Market street, intends suing the owners for 
some. $30,000. How comes this particular individual to 
estimate himself at so high a figure as $30,000? Willie 
Hearst comes no higher than that. 

A MAN cannot expect to have the daily newspapers re- 
cord the fact that he has a cold in the head, or has 
sneezed three times in succession, until he has become a 
multi-millionaire. Such distinction is reserved alone for 
the rich. 

THE easy manner in which several budding politicians 
presented their Bills in the Assembly goes far to 
prove that they have all had more or less experience with 
that fiend in human guise — the dun. 

SOME Eastern philanthropists are publishing a journal 
entitled, "What to Eat." The Town Crier has 
scratched himself bald over the question: " How To Get 
It." 

WHEN a man is said to be "on trial for his life," the 
statement bears a literal significance in San Fran- 
cisco. It takes a lifetime to reach a verdict. 

HOW is it that little Willie Hearst has not pitched his 
tent at Sacran ento? Surely he is aware of the pre- 
sence of a saclc in that most holy of cities. 

NO wonder it has been so cold of late in San Francisco. 
All the hot stuff is assembled at Sacramento. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



DEAR EDITH: The popularity of lace as a garniture 
is well maintained. One can hardly say that it is 
more popular than ever, for the climax of its popularity 
was attained long ago. The combination of lace and fur 
is a conspicuous feature of winter fashions. The fur 
shoulder cape, with its complement of many sable or mink 
tails, is further ornamented with a fall of very costly lace. 
Some of the high rolling fur collars or collars lined with 
fur, have folds of lace laid between the collar and the neck. 
There are cravat ends of lace which are allowed to hang 
straight, or otherwise are softly knotted beneath the chin. 

.Many of the chestnut, Havana, and nasturtium shades 
have acquired new beauty this season, and are greatly in 
evidence, and among certain high-class modistes and 
tailors all the rich browns, fawns and grays are more used 
than any other colors for elegant day costumes. Next in 
favor are the handsome silk-and-wool mixtures, the basket- 
cloths and boucles in black and colors. 

The Scotch tweeds for winter show great variety in de- 
sign, and for utility uses are made with good-length coats 
and seven-gored skirts. Costumes of richly-colored tailor 
cloths have natty jacket bodices made double-breasted 
over the chest and cut out slightly on the very lower por- 
tion to show the points of vest made of white cloth, Suede 
kid, or decorated velvet or satin. These give uncommon 
style to the gown. 

Military scarlet and rich Danish red are undoubtedly 
very fashionable colors for children this winter, among 
these being scarlet cloth coats and Tam O'Shanter caps to 
match. Entire suits ol this brilliant color are brought out 
both for the small men and maidens, and smart little blouses 
are made variously in combinations of red and white, red 
and blue, scarlet and green, etc., some braided, others 
finished with straight lines of gold, white, or black cord. 
Plum color, rich brown, and soft fawn shades are likewise 
used on stylish and picturesque suits, and corduroy and 
velveteen with trimmings of handsome Irish crochet lace 
are in great vogue. Pretty lace sets of wide collar and 
deep cuffs are added to fancy velvet costumes for both 
boys and girls. 

It is very smart to make the dress match the revers. 
These, if of red, are in tone with the deep red dress. If 
of gray satin, they match a gray gown, and if of white. 
they are worn with plain black. White broadcloth skirts 
are considerably worn. They tone toward gray, and are 
very pretty. 

To meet the requirements of the new style of hair-dress- 
ing, many bats have strings which cross at the back and 
tie at the left side. Flowers and rosettes are not so gen- 
erally seen beneath the brim, but rest on strings at the 
back midway between the neck and the hat. The promi- 
nent jug-handle style of coiffure is now wholly pant. The 
center coil comes closer to the head, and often the hair is 
carried to the top of the head, and arranged <„ l; 
dour in a series of soft puffs, braids or toils, arranged in 
some original fashion that best suits the face. It is quite 
the style to again part the hair on the left side and wave 
it on both sides of the parting. A few women who admire 
classic modes are arranging their tresses d >■' '.'.- 
This is always a most trying coiffure. BELINDA. 



Paso Robles. 

Onr new mud bath house is finished. The arrangement of hath s, 

tag rooms, etc., are on the same floor. No stairs or steps to 

climb. We are now unquestionably the finest sanitarium or health 

re.-..rt on the Pacific Coast. Rest and health seekers are Paso Kobles 

seekers. Bates, $10, *l2.50,*15,and H7.60 per week. Climate warm. 

Of all the well-tried Bourbon whiskeys on the market the cele- 
brated "Argonant" brand is undoubtedly the peer. This delectable 
fluid has been recommended by the most eminent physicians and 
bas proven itself a fav • connoisseurs. The agent* f..r 

this Coast are Messrs. E. Ha I . 1 1 Market street, whose 

reputation alone is a guaranty for the line quality of their goods. 

Kelly's Com Cure never falls. Scents. 102 Eddy street. 



Grand Annual 
Midwinter 
Clearance Sale 



Now in Progress. 



+ 



Everything at a 

Prodigious 

Sacrifice. 



See Daily Papers for Particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



FINE FURS 

and 

SEALSKIN 




jlffki GARHENTS 



to order. Remodeling and 
repairitjf.* :n prices furbe- 
low those of any oiher fur- 
rier on ibe Pacific Coast. 
Alt work guaranteed. 

flD. K060UR, 

FASHIONABLE FURRIER, 
SV2 Kearny Street (Up-stairs), 

don IW Ne» ( Yor'£ iCle ' Ponner,y cut, « r with Revillon Freres, Paris, Lon- 

I m D6 rlanWR6o 6n6raw 

If you value your hair, use only the Imperial Hair 
Regenerator, to make GRAY HAIR its natural color, 
or BLEACHED HAIR any color desired. Baths do 
not affect it Neither does curling or crimping In- 
comparable tor the BEARD on account of its durability 
and cleanliness. 

No 1, Black; 2, Dark Brown; 3, Medium 
Brown; 4. Chestnut; 5. Light Chestnut 
8, Gold Blonde; 7, Ash Blonde. 

PRICE, $1 50 and $3 

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL MFG. CO. 

292 Filth Ave., N. y. 

For sale by Druggists and Hairdressers K? 
in San Francisco; sold and applied hy v£^ 

Stan IS in t Qtwrrnchl txr,A I ' r . 1 . 1 .,•.-. i .. i. 3fS 




-— u —u iiaut,iij W( buiu nuu apputni 

Stanislas Strozynskl and Goldstein 
Conn. 




Joseph Glllott's Steel Pens, 



Gold Medals. Paris 187&-IB8B. These pens are " the best 
l5i he „ worM - So'e a « ent 'c <he United States. 
MR HENRY HOE. »1 John Street, New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 






January 9, 1897. 



SAN FR 



'5 




"Wilson baa .1 doosI unhappy way of expressing himself." 

"He told me he was going to propose to that charming 

willow from Chicago." "He <Jiii. but bis clumsy 

effort to be off-hand and easy sjioilcil it. He had read 

1 Chicago divorcee until he thought they 

true." "What did he say to the widow.'' "He 

her if she was engaged for her next wedding." — 

Washington Star. 

"What kind of goods, ma'am'.'" asked the salesman. 
"I think.'' replied the young woman who had just bought 
a wheel and was about to order her first riding suit, "you 
may show me some of your early fall styles." — Chicago 
Tribune. 

"Nan, we are going to have individual communion cups 
in our church.'' "How lovely!" "Yes; and won't it be 
charming when we have individual clergymen — one for 
every girl in the parish?" — Chicago Record. 

Sexton (from the vestry room)— Dr. Blank — Dr. Blank — 
the church is on tire. Dr. Blank (from the pulpit)— 
Very well, William; I will retire. Perhaps you'd better 
wake up the congregation. — Harper's Bazar. 

Ambling Anderson — I see by de papers dat de new 
t'ousand-dollar notes is badly printed on bum paper. 
Facetious Farrington — Is dat so? It's funny I ain't 
noticed it. — New York World. 

Nursegiri — I lost track of the child, mum, and 

"Good gracious! Why didn't you speak to a policeman?" 
NiRsEiiiitL — I was speaking to wan all the toime, mum. 
— Pearson's Weekly. 

She — It requires six things to make married life happy. 
He— Indeed! She — Yes; the first is a model husband. 
He— And then? She— The other five consists of money. 
— La Caricature. 

"Angel cake," said the married man, who refused to 
permit the use of his name, "Is so called because it 
would require an angel to eat it without suppressed pro- 
fanity." — Puck. 

Deacon Black — How did you like it down at Bloomtown? 
Rev. White — I tell you, they're wide awake down there! 
"Oh, then you didn't preach for them?"— Yonkers 
Statesman. 

"Delia, don't you feel bad about separating from your 
husband?" "Oh, horribly, Julia; you see, I have his name 
embroidered all over my autograph pillow." — Chicago 
Record. 

"Do you enjoy novel reading, Miss Belinda?" "Oh, very 
much; one can associate with people in fiction that one 
wouldn't dare to speak to in real life. "—Chicago Record. 
"The apple crop is enormous this year." "Yes, and 
they say that apples are brain food." "Well, they didn t 
act that way on Adam and Eve."— Chicago Record. 

Duzbey— I understand that Mrs. Buzbuz had begun 
divorce proceedings. Doobey — On what grounds ! 
Duzbey— South Dakota.— Roxburg Gazette. 

"What makes you think that Oldly is an honest man?'' 
"Because I heard him tell his wife that he stayed out all 
night to play poker."— Detroit Free Press. 

Somebody "asked a girl what she would do if she had a 
mustache on her upper lip. "If I liked the man I d keep 
quiet," said she. — Ex. 

* "is there any English equivalent of 'raconteur?'" 
"Well, 'bore' fills the bill in some places."— Puck. 

Adolphus— I've half a mind Kate— There Dolly, 

don't exaggerate.— Boston T ranscript. 

Through Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 
The Atlantic and Pacific Kailroad (Santa Fe route) runs daily 
through from Oakland to Chicago first-class drawing room and 
second-class modern upholstered tourist sleeping cars. Lowest, rates 
to all points in the United States, Canada, Mexico or Europe. 
Tioket office, 644 Market street, opposite Chronicle Building, leie- 
phone Main 1531. 



ihcr l.imp.himn. 
quarter . Macbeth's; 

or 1 heap in the long run. 

■\ on want the right shape 
besides. We'll send you tin: 
Index : 

Geo A Mai beth 

Pkulmnh P. 

CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 



KKSTAUUANTS. 
Bergez't Restaurant, &oad< mv Building, 3Tfc!-."Wi Pine street Rooms for 

ladles and families, private entrance. John Bcrgcz, Proprietor. 
Maison Tortoni, Fro&oh RotlMOrle, ill O'Farrcll street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constautini, Proprietor 
Nevada Restaurant, -117 Pino st. Private rooms; meals &Oo. Locjpy Bros 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. A'J9. A. B. Blanco & B. Bruit 

DENTISTS. 

Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southuest cor. Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p.m. Consultation Hours: -4 to 5. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St., near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105O*Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER-MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 31-*, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

PRINTING AND RUBBER STAMPS. 
Koch & Harney, (.'his. H. Harney, Geo. T. Koch), Job Printers, 648 Sacra- 
mento St. Fine printing and embossing, seals, rubber stamps, stencils, eto. 

CANDIES. 
Latest English Pear Drops. Roberts', Polk and Bush. 

VEHICLES 
Latest style Victoria, only used a few times; also, three-seated drag, 
500 Golden Gate Avenue. 



INDIA OPIUfl CURE, 



Room 1, Columbian Building, 
916 Market Street, S. F. 



B. D. Kimmis, Proprietor. 

OPIUM, MORPHINE and COCAINE 

And all other opiate habits cured speedily and effectively or money re- 
funded. Ladies treated privately at home. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
eanners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stable men, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 

LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, Telephone, Bush IS. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE: 23 Powell St., opp. Baldwin Hotel. 
BRANCH: 11 Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue. 
LAUNDRY: Twelfth St., bet. Folsom and Howard, S. F. 
All ordinary mending, sewing on buttons, etc., free of 
charge. Orders left at office will receive prompt attention. 
Work called for and delivered to any part of the city free cf 
charge. 



Try the SftN FRftNGlSGO LAUNDRY, 

Office, 33 Geaiy street. Telephone Main 5125. 
Oakland Office— 864 Broadway. Telephone Main 658. 



United States Laundry, 



Office; 1004 Market bt., near Baldwin. Telephone, South M-0. 



Weak Hen and Women Mt^StfgSSkSE 

edv • It gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 823 Mar- 
It e t street, San Franolsco. (Send for eiroular.) 



i6 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 




WHEN the news reached this city that there was a bog 
moving in Ireland, and th 
but surely, creeping towa 

e excitement among the A i irof Hibernians, 

It was propose" Inch should com- 

prise the most prominent members ol the ' 
through the Golden Gati 
somewhere in the vicinity 
this geographical wonder became kno 
there was a wild rush for places on the O 

course, it was understood that the 
mittec might aspire to any 
backed up by this am 
the most serious consn 

lion of Ireland was how the new Hibernians were to be 
accommodated on the police force. It eras felt all around 
that it would be a dangerous thing to 
to which their accident of birth This diffi- 

culty was solved, however-, by the clever sup 
Judge Toohy that it might be necessary to tro 

chas in every county to ch itato- 

bug, and that the new and laterial the 

old country would bring, would I 
this purpose. It would bi e to move il 

Sorrows in through the Golden Gate, and, therefore, 
position off the western shore, not to from the 

Cliff House, would have to A committi 

ways and means will undoubtedly provide for the ru 
of a line of steamers between Ireland and the ocean I 
A small fee of admission will be charged those who 
to make temporary visits to the land of their birth, 
those who, having heard so mm ill be 

anxious to inspect her mountains and rivers, her 
abbeys, and the lakes of Killarney, The graves of her 
patriots will be shown to tourists, and huge markets for 
the sale of shamrocks and black-thori 
lished. Whether the "land of the fn me of 

the brave" will be annexed to the United Stat 
ter which will have to be derided by the party now in 
power. It is more than pri 
of Ireland themselves will it 
moil that must follow the presentation of 1 iers of 

the Irish royal families which are scattered all over the 

surface of the globe, will afford some nice pi 11 riot 

drill for the new police force. Again, it will be a matter 
of importance to the revenues of this State whether the 
native " potheen " whiskey can be admitted free of duty 
or not. 

# # * 

The death of J. Ross Jackson has been the immed 
cause for the revival of many 
doings, the recalling of some 'of the witticisms for 
hewas famous and examples of his keen am 
partee. His wit was spont 

and piquancy is lost in a subsequ tion. Bis 

humor sparkled but nevi 

malice in his chaffing. Hewas: ay that he 

could never see the point of a joki 
lighted, but when evening came lunded 

he was the life of every pai 
by the wayside 

always remained master of himself. In 
was counted one of the wonders of th. 
hear a good story and to 1 
One favorite anecdote h 
beat him at a famous game of billiards 
among the guests at at j, er 

gathered all tbi 

Rose was an expert player and ha 
and daughter in the game until thej 
degree of proficiency of 

Jackson confided in tl thers I at 

rise out of her husband and at the ga m on 



tring." On pretense of giving him a new variety of 

1 s of which he was 
be made him a concoction of 

■ given a drink after almost every 

the terrible beverage, it soon 

Ml the guests guyed Ross about his play. 

"YV beat you myself," said Mrs. Jackson, 

itly at what he considered her 

"Well, I ; game for twenty dollars," she 

Ro od chance to recoup himself for a 

ented so confident of win- 

i e slakes should be deposited with 

By this time the effect of the 

1 in and vision became defective 

and he |i si a good many points. He was 

il was several days before any - 

Men him as to the direct cause of 

I son was entertaining a ranch- 
man who at Ins home drank nothing but good old Bourbon, 
h he was impervious. Ross ordered 
a gin Gzz ai ntrynaan without the least idea of 

what 1 e said he would take the same, 

thought t hi "Jim Fizz," as be called it, must 
mild did it seem, and he had a 
I' answer to his inquiry, 
!■ was named after .lames Fizz, who 

"Who is_ this Jim Fizz?" asked the rancher with grow- 
ing en 1 ould like to make his acquaintance." 
quizzically eyed bis friend, who was in a fair way 
ome gloriously inebriated. 

ou had better look out for him." he warned. "Jim 
Fizz does up every one who sticks to him." 



In the me 1 vats, Edward Eyre is at once the 

sorrow of the Produce Exchange,— a mingling 

and envy. He is exceedingly fastidious concerning 

his neckwe - adorning "himself with the latest 

dasher and it is a matter of principle 

to wear the same one on successive davs. 

keeps a necktie journal, wherein is 

ie of wearing a certain cravat, which after 

Fully laid aside not to reappear within 

on the floor of the Call Hoard 

ir Eyre whi?h materialized just be- 

fore ' they desired to see him so 

lughly equipped that during 1807 he would wear a 

new tie every morning in the year and all the bulls and 

ributions so that the total numbered 365. 

Kv '''' "Eddie's necktie stocking," as it was 

cal,e,; amples and a big grain sackful 

Exchange of these weird 

• institute a fantastic collection 
'ds the compliment of wearing 

II be a brave man. but an unhappy one" 

«1 flashy patterns procurable are 

icludes all the freak styles known 

tp the furnisher, from a red and green muffler to a yellow 

1 ring. 

* * # 

tine's place was in the claws of 

were tearing the place to 

lower from aloft was pouring down 

a glorious stream of water, up the tottering staircase 

idual with the lire of heroism in his eye. 

' • any woman lying appalled and 

peril of the situation. It was not his part 

bi a neglected by its mercenary 

111 the water-tower came pouring 

in 1 lie face of danger, of lire and 

' unscrewed the telephone from the 

ruined building, bearing under his arm 

ace to that most useful article. 

"ebadfaci ,■■! breasted the rushing stream, 

rom the wiy heart of the conflagration the 

I 'OX. 



January <;. 1897. 



FRAxci n-:R. 



Following are some of th- 
ither 
and John i 
good wine and sV.. 

(or th' • Innertoo riding 

• tandem bicycle in the Park Mr Mitro demolishing the 
plaster mor- .it "The Heights;" Durrant a pew- 

Opener m a fashionable church; Talbot Clifton bank from 
Europe, and buying more horses from Dan McCarthy 
Anna Shaw married and rooking a cradle; Mayor I'lielan 
with the scalps of a "Solid Seven" at his belt; William ' 
Greer Harrison tramping from the "Sierras to tbe 
Joaquin Miller with his hair out A h fompadovr; the "old- 
sters and the youngsters" of the Pacific Union Club united 
in the bonds of love and harmony: the " Ion;,' and the abort 
fellows" who do all the footpad business captured by the 
police: large poster pictures and bigger type in the 
dailies; "Long Green" Lawrence engaged in geological 
pursuits at Folsom, examining quarries, etc.; the "short 
bit" financial infamy abolished; Judge Campbell's whiskers 
shorn down to the roots: Colonel Dan Burns keeping a cigar 
store: women's hats left with cloaks and umbrellas in the 
dressing rooms of the theatres; and all the churches har- 
monious. 

OBITUARY. 

THE death of Thomas J. Shack leford removes from our 
midst one of our brightest and most prominent attor- 
neys. He came to California in the early days, and set- 
tled in Tulare County. In the early sixties he was elected 
County Clerk of that county, and subsequently served a 
term in the Legislature, and two terms as Secretary of 
the State Senate. 

George W. Meade. Another prominent Californian, Geo. 
W. Meade, expired this week in Los 
Angeles. For a time he was largely identilied with the 
raisin-packing industry at Fresno, and did much for the 
towns of Santa Barbara, Riverside, Santa Rosa, RedlaDds, 
and elsewhere. At one time he was a leading commission 
merchant in this city, and built the Meade Block on Drumm 
street. 

George Haas. The funeral of George Haas, the well- 
known candy manufacturer and dealer, 
took place on Tuesday at Cypress Lawn Cemetery. Im- 
posing ceremonies were held at the Masonic Temple, the 
deceased having been a Knight Templar. Mr. Haas was 
born in Germany, but came to this Coast as a boy. 



THE semi-annual report of the City and County Alms- 
house, submitted to the Board of Health by Superin- 
tendent E. A. Reddy, is most satisfactory in every re- 
spect, and speaks eloquently for that gentleman's manage- 
ment of the institution. The inmates are well cared for, 
and all seem pleased with their surroundings, although the 
expenditure is considerably within the appropriation 
allowed. The suggestions of Superintendent Reddy for 
further improvements will undoubtedly receive the atten- 
tion of the Board. 



PROFESSOR Dupuy, the popular French lecturer, re- 
sumed his course" of instructive lectures Thursday 
last, and will continue them every Thursday. 

Are You Going East? 
The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, Santa Fe Route, 19 the coolest 
and most comfortable summer line, owing to its elevation and ab- 
sence of alkali dust. Particularly adapted to the transportation of 
families or large parties, owing to its Pullman palace drawing room 
and modern upholstered tourist sleepers, which run daily through 
from Oakland to Chicago via Kansas City. Ticket office, 644 Market 
street, Chronicle building. Telephone Main 1531. 



Viewing the Senatorial fight now in progress in Sacramento, and 
hearing the noise of the battle from afar off, it is safe to say that no 
matter upon whom tbe Senatorial mantle of California falls, that 
statesman will drink Keystone Mo nogram Wh iskey. 

A Sovereign Remedy. 
DR. PARKER'S COUGH CURE. One dose will stop a cough. It never 
fails. Try It. Price 25c. George Dahlbender & Co , 814 Kearny street. 

Bronchitis. Sudden changes or the wealher cause Bronchial Troubles. 
" Brown's Bronchial Troches" will give effectual relief. 



wealth 



itality and en< d appetite, and | 

feet health arc obtained and endure by taking 



Peruvian 
Bitters. 



W. rl. RAMSEY, 

Successor to 

REEVE & RAMSEY 

Merchant ^ Tailor 
121 Montrjomerij Street, 

Opposite Occidental Hotel. 

J D. SULLIVAN. 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

Ostrander Repeating Gun Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location o 
works or factory— 36 New street, East Boston, Mass. 

NOTICE— There are delinquent upon tbe following described stock, on 
account of an assessment (No. 5), levied on the 23d day of August, 1896, 
the several amounts set opposite the names of the respective sharebold 
ers, as follows : 

No. No. 

Name. Certificate Shares Am t 

C. A. Macomber 405 500 50 

" 406 5fl0 50 

W. P. Rav. U. S. N- 1S3 1,000 100 

Mrs. Elizabeth Carter 104 500 50 

311 500 50 

J. M. Helm 164 600 60 

258 301 30 10 

11 260 155 15 50 

W. H. H. Hart 416 1,000 100 

Catherine S. Whiteside 204 1,000 100 
George H Hoover 389 50 5 

W. S, Zeilin 213 250 26 

Mrs. Mary Mearse Gait 179 1,000 100 
John A. Wright 430 105 10 50 

G20, O. Davis, Trustee 435 200 20 

436 200 20 

437 100 10 
E. P. Cole 397 500 50 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors, made 
on the 22d day of August, 1896, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company, No. 216 Busb street, rooms 50 and 51, City and County of San 
Francisco, California, on 

THURSDAY, THE 22nd DAY OF OCTOBER, 1896, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m. of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale, 

M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
Office— No. 216 Bush street, Rooms 50 and 51. SanFrancisco, Califo nla. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was post- 
poned until 

FRIDAY, the 20th DAY of NOVEMBER, 1896, 

at the same time and place. M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 

SanFrancisco, October 22, 1896. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was post- 
poned until 

FRIDAY, the 18th DAY of DECEMBER, 1896, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26, 216 Bush street, San Francisco, Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, November 19, 1896. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held at tbe office of the company on the 18th inst , the sale of the 
above delinquent stock was postponed until 

THURSDAY, the 14th DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26. 216 Bush street. San Franoisco, Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, Dec. 28, 1897 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meetingof the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held at the office of the company, on the 6th Inst., the sale of the 
above delinquent stock was postponed until 

WEDNESDAY, the 27th DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26, 216 Bush street, San Francisco. Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, January 6, 1897. 



_ — * 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897 




THE New Year was very merrily ushered in, not alone 
by the crowds who, with tin horns and oil cans in 
hand, made ni«_rbl most hideous upon the streets for sev- 
eral hours, but at the homes, where jollity reigned and 
toasts were drank to the prosperity which 1897 is to bring 
us. There were two grand affairs at two of the clubs— 
the Concordia and the San Francisco Yerein. The latter 
club always gives an entertainment on New Year's Eve, 
and this war, besides the usual ball, there was an e 
lent vaudeville performance, in which negro specialties, 
: mine dances, Japanese, Irish, and French delinea- 
tions were given ; Mrs. William Greenebaum, the Misses 
Jennie Moore, Alice Greenebaum; Hilda Gerstle, and Alice 
Friedlander, Julius Kalm. Jessie Triest, and Manfred 
■ in took part. It was greatly enjoyed and 
vociferously applauded. Then followed dancing, an elab- 
orate supper, and then more dancing, so the New Year 
was several hours old ere the festivity came to an end. 

Miss Dorothy Hermann was the belle of the Concordia 
ball. This most popular and beautiful young lady was 
prettily dressed id white chiffon, trimmed with pink ruses, 
and was the recipient of much favorable comment. 

New Year Eve dances were not, however, contiued to 
the clubs, an especially pleasant party being given by 
Mis. J. O'B. Gunn, at her home on Clay Btreet, where 
terpsichore was the chief feature of the evening's pleasure 
and a merry supper a delightful finale. Another pleasant 
gathering was the progressive euchre party given by 
Mrs .1. W, Hut ton, when the game, at which some lovely 
prizes were won, was followed by a handsome supper. 

So much for town. In the country, house parties were 
the rule, and those who have homes of their own down 
San .lose wards had each a number of friends to help them 
ii the passing, and welcome the coming year. The 
at Burlingame last Saturday was successful enough 
t 1 greatly please the promoters of the sport, who are 
confident that it is here to stay, and that time will but 
increase its popularity. The polo contest on Sunday was 
also a good one, the Benedicts carrying off the laurels 
from the Bachelors, who vow the next one shall not be 
won from them. 

Two of the most untiring of our hostesses made their 
friends welcome early in the year, Mrs. Hounseville Wild- 
man's tea fin New Year's afternoon proving one of the 
enjoyable affairs of the kind given this winter. Pos- 
sibly the reflection that it was a sort of adieu of the host- 
ess induced the large attendance of her friends, and it was 
very reminiscent of old-time New Year's calls to many of 
them, save that it was not men alone who called with good 
wishes, but that ladies were largely in the majority. Mrs. 
Wildman was assisted by a whole bevy of charming! 
turned young ladies, who were most assiduous in their at- 
tentions to the guests. 

Mrs. Jewett ehose the second of January for her de- 
lightful entertainment, and, on Saturday evening, her 
pretty rooms were tastefully arranged with Christmas 
greens and red berries, and filled with friends who en- 
1 a most unique evening's pleasure, one of the items 
-.' a distribution of gifts by lot, some of which elicited 
much amusement, and all were much admired. Music and 
supper were among the other pleasures of the affair. 

Of the myriad of pink and white weddings which have 
been so much of a fad for several seasons past, none have 
ded in beauty of detail the ceremony of last Tuesday, 
when, at the hour of noon, Miss Helen Schweitzer became 
Mrs. Samuel Steifel. The marriage took place at the 
Schweitzer residence on Leavenworth street, where, on 
entering, the hall presented a beautiful appearance with 
its artistic arrangement of palms, calla lilies, and white 
tulle; but the most charming effect was in the long parlor 
to the left of the hall, which resembled a vast conserva- 
tory with its wealth of blossoms, shaded from pale pink to 



crimson, green foliage, etc. Here, before an improvised 
altar of pink and white embroidered silks, whereon gleamed 
innumerable pink tapers amid masses of pink roses, Rabbi 
Voorsanger tied the nuptial knot. The pretty petite bride's 
costume was of white tulle over heavy white satin, a wreath 
of orange blossoms and fleecy tulle vail, and the bouquet was 
of white orchids and lilies of the valley. Miss Clara Joseph, 
who officiated as maid-of-honor, wore a gown of white 
mousselim de soie over white silk ; the Misses Cora Miller, 
Alice Greenebaum, Agnes Brandenstein, and Belle Gerstle 
were gowned in pink moire, and all the young ladies wore 
velvet Gainsborough hats and plumes. Two pretty 
little maidens, Edith and Florence Guggenheim, acquitted 
themselves charmingly as flower girls; Joseph Scherburg 
supported the groom as best man. After the ceremony, 
and congratulations had been received, the company pro- 
ceeded to a tent which had been erected -on the lawn, 
where a sumptuous wedding feast was served, and later 
in the day the happy pair departed on a honeymoon trip, 

I prior to their longer journey Eastward to their future 

[ home in New York. 

The first sensation of the New Year came in the an- 
nouncement of Miss Emma Spreckels' marriage to Mr. 
Thomas Watson, which was a surprise to everybody. The 
new brownstone mansion on Van Ness avenue, which is 
rapidly approaching completion, has been regarded as a 
fitting home for so charming a young lady as Miss 
Spreckels was thought to be by society at large, and the 
query which is being discussed by it is. will she still preside 
at the festivities which are hoped for and expected when 
it is occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Claus Spreckels? In other 
words, will she live with the old folks or in a home of her 
own? In the meantime Mr. and Mrs. Watson are the re- 
cipients of many congratulations, and the good wishes of 
all who know them. 

This has been a week of club dances and club entertain- 
ments. The Monday Night Club opened it with the second 
of their enjoyable dances at Golden Gate Hall, at which 
the attendance was large, and a charming evening was 
spent. On Wednesday evening the third dance of the 
Assembly Cotillion Club came off at Lunt's Hall, when 
Mr. Yanke, as leader, introduced several new and pretty 
figures in the cotillion. Thursday evening the Thursday 
Night Club had a dance at Eunt's Hall, and last evening 
the third of the Friday Night cotillions was danced at 
< >dd Fellows' Hall, Mr. Greenway leading with Miss Caro 
Crockett as his partner. As usual, the arrangements 
were excellent, the decorations pretty, the figures danced 
charming, and the .-upper delicious. It is agreed on all 
sides that tfu cotillion of the season will prove to be the 
one danced next month, at which a number of surprises 
are promised in the shape of lighting the hall, etc. Great 
things are also expected at the nextmeeting of the Friday 
Fortnightlies next week, when it will be the long talked-of 
Army and Navy night. The cotillion of the Saturday Night 
Club, which was the closing event of last week, was on 
rather a larger and more formal scale than their usual 
parties, and proved to be most pleasant. General dancing 
was first in order, then came the cotillion, which was led by 
Howard Adams, the figures being all new and original, 
the favors consisting of fans, bon-bons, etc. 

The theatres have not been neglected this week, though 
theatre parties have not been generally given during the 
holidays. Now, however, a large number are being ar- 
ranged for the engagement of Madam Modjeska; an added 
zest to the pleasure of seeing that popular actress is the 
fact that both Mrs. Francis Edgerton, who is such a 
society favorite, and Miss Francis Jolliffe will make their 
dibut in the profession they contemplate adopting, Mrs. 
Edgerton appearing as Queen Elizabeth to Madam Mod- 
jeska's Mary. Queen of Scots. 

The most economical tea is tea that tastes the 
bast and does most good — if it doesn't cost too 
much. 

Schilling's Best doesn't cost much — your 
money back if you don't like it. 



January 9, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



NO champagnes are so rapidly coming into favor to- 
day as the " Haraszthy Brut " and the "Haraszthy 
Dry " brands. Not only are they well patronized here, 
but they have proved themselves universal favorites in 
Europe, owing to their unsurpassable qualities. At several 
exhibitions the wines have been awarded the highest prizes 
and their popularity is ever on the increase among con- 
noisseurs. The drinker of good wine is ever on the look- 
out for an improvement, and in these brands he will find it. 

"Oup Society Blue Book" 

For the season of 1896-97 is now ready for delivery. It contains 
the names, addresses and reception days of most of the prominent 
families ot this city and other points on the Coast. Also lists of 
members of the most prominent Clubs with their business addresses. 

San Francisco Street and Avenue Guide, Ladies' Shopping Guide, 
etc. Price Five Dollars. C. C. Hoag, Publisher. 

Trade supplied by Hartwell. Mitchell & Willis, Successors to 
Dodge Bros, 225 Post St., and 107 Montgomery St. 

Of all the many preparations patronized by ladies as complexion 
beautiflers none is so universal a favorite as Camelline. It is ab- 
solutely harmless and its merits are endorsed by some of the best 
known women of the present day. Having tried it once, none other 
will ever give satisfaction. Wakelee & Co., the well-known druggists, 
originated this boon to ladies. 

Max Abraham, the Caterer, 428 Geary street, is the man to go to 
if you wish all the worry of a banquet taken ofl your hands. Mr. 
Abraham is patronized by our leading hostesses and by securing his 
services you can be assured of success. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" tor your 

children while teething. 

The King ot Pills is Beecham's— BEEOHAM'S 



• home la>- aflornoon. wh,-n tin- 

club gave a reception at which l-Vank I. 
of honor — Mr. II lv other >, 

ent Christmas decorations le In order 

aud instrumental musks, n were 00 the pro- 

gramme, which was arranged bj Mr-. H. K Huntington, 
after which there was Russian tea and unlimited chat. 
The ladies of the Century Club, who an- ever In the van 
when novelty is the prime factor, opened the New year 
bursday evening with a unique entertainment at their 
club house on Sutter street. It was entitled "An Indian 

Bveuing," and the decorations were of a character t r 

■1 with that idea, being curios of all kinds, trinkets. 
and pictures of Indian life. The speakers of the <■■ 
were Mi-s lua Cooloritb, Miss Grace Hudson, whose paint 
if Indian papooses arc so realistic and so much ad- 
mired, and Dr. Hudson, who contributed many of the curi- 
ous and beautiful baskets which adorned the walls of the 
rooms. 

Mrs. Geiselman's yellow tea last Saturday afternoon was 
for the dibut of her daughter Grace. The decorations were 
in yellow, acacia blooms taking a prominent place: the 
young dlbutante and her assistants were all gowned in 
white, with yellow sashes and corsage bouquets, and dur- 
ing the afternoon a very large number of guests were en- 
tertained, the festivities being prolonged by the young 
people until a late hour in the evening. Mrs. James New- 
lands was also another recent tea hostess; her guest of 
honor. Mrs. Allen of San Jose. The chief guests at Mrs. 
Michler's University Club luncheon were Mrs. and Miss 
Brown of Washington, D. C, and Dr. Younger, who has 
been detained here by the illness of his daughter Alice, 
lilicd that role at the banquet given by Dr. and Mrs. Clyde 
Payne, the other guests being medicos also. 

Mr. S. H. Friedlander leaves to-night for Portland, 
Oregon, on business connected with the various enter- 
prises of his firm. Mr. Friedlander will be absent for ten 
days after which he will return to devote his time to the 
interests of the Carnival of the Golden Gate. 

The installation of the officers of the Franco- American 
Lodge to-night at Odd Fellows' Hall, will be celebrated by 
au invitation ball. The grand march commences at 9 
o'clock. No return checks ! 

The wedding of Miss Bertha J. Hart and Mr. I. W. Cahen 
takes place January 17, 1897. Only the immediate family 
will he present at the ceremony. 

The Fred Sharons and Miss Lena Blanding are said to 
be on the eve of a return to California. 



"I like the 

small pai n c." 

' I .. lady ! 
-L +■ "il 

2 CTS. A v 

/Tinas'. 

l - en u 
in . pwtth 
Ik r Pearl- 
ine—,.'.! unnecessary. If you don'l 
lough Pearlinc t.> <1<> the 
vork easily and alone, you bring 
Pearline down to the: level of soap, which means 
hard work and rubbing. If yon use enough 
Pearline, the soap i • a needless expense, to say 
the least. UseP a< '■-" a I •" 'irected. «a 




a Wash 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

Fnr ihe half year ending December 'ti 1890, a dividend has beeu declared 

nt the rate of tour ami iw -tenth* (4 fc-10| per oenl per annum -m 'I erm De 

posits, and, three aud one-half (SJ4) per cent per nunum on Ordinary De* 

posits, free of taxes, poyuhte i.u and after Saturday. January 9, I8W, Dlvl- 
uends not c-illed ror »r« udiled to und beiir tin- same rate < >r dividend as 
the principal from and after January 1, 1K97 

CYRUS W CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 1U1 Montgomery street, cor Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with Dec, 81, 1808, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, tmd three and 
one-third (SJfi) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, Junuary 2, 1897. 

Office— 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 
Dividends on Term Deposits at the rate of four and one-fifth (4 1-S) per 
cent per annum, and on Ordiuary Deposits at the rate of three and one- 
half (3V4) per cent per annum for the half year ending December 31, 1806, 
will be payable free of taxes on and after January £, 1897 

S L. ABBOT JR., Secretary. 
Office : 223 Montg mery e treet, Mills Building. San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with Dec. 31st, 1896, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty-six one hundredths (4 26-hU) per cent 
per annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty five one hundredths 
(3 55-H iU) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Saturday, January 2, 1897. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Offlce—526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union, 
For the half year ending Dec. 31, 1896. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate per annum of four and two-tenths (4 2) per cent, on term deposits and 
three and five-tenths (3 n) percent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and afte. Saturday, January 2, 18«7. 
Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of tne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Dec. 3U, 18SJ6, At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six months ending December 3U, 1896, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2, 1897. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



THE 



California Hotel i Hotel Rafael 




THE 



;*5 Open all the year. Only 50 
*s minutes from San Francisco. 



Absolutely Fireproof. 

ncisco . .. . Gal. 1 1 San Rafael . . . Gal. |j 



Two modern, exquisite, home-like first-class hotels, 
both under personal supervision of Gen. Warfleld. 



R. ft. WflRFIELD & GO., Proprietors. 



•^ss 



■ •.• •.•■.•••■-. V: •_• '::■ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.K'l 



January 9, 1897. 




" ' DEARS ler me thet Adsom's would be the best way 
1 ter git there." The speaker was the last of many 
who had drawled out an opinion. The person addressed, 
a tall muscular Englishman, gazed at the circle of faces 
before him. Be was slightly puzzled. He had taken ad- 
vantage of a holiday to travel the one hun.i inter- 
vening between San I and Cloverville, in search of 
timber land which lie had purchased several years 
lavingseen it. His arrival In CLover- 
ville had been the cause of considerable excitement. 
Twenty live miles off the railroad in California means com- 
parative barbarism, and there was an unmistakable out- 
of-the world flavor about the place. The natural advan- 
tages of the little settlement were of the finest. Every 
afternoon a gentle breeze blew inland from the west, so 

tually thai Its advent was as much looked for as the 
rising or setting of the sun. In spite of these advantages 
the hamlet had not grown perceptibly in forty years, 
of hills which separated it from the rail- 
road— symbolical of civilization and the world — seemed to 
guard il with a conservative jealousy that opposed pro- 
gress in any form. The hotel, which with the black 
smith's shop, cue store and three saloons, comprised the 

ess portion of the town, was most primitive. 
Harraden ate a wretched dinner and was glad to leave 
the dining room for the office.— a bare room, unfurnished 
with the exception of a cast iron stove and a few hard 
chairs, where he propounded a few questions to mine 

During the conversation he was conscious that faces 
were peering in at the windows and figures were slipping 
into the room. Before long every male inhabitant of the 
village from half grown boys to tottering old men 

surrounded him in a hypnotized circle. 

"I calc'late the best way would be by the Pint Sand 
road/' drawled an old man in faded blue denims. "Ef 
Cat Crick ami .Moss Crick jine on your land, it'll be 'bout 
eight miles right up Clear Crick ter git to it, I come here 
' he added with a touch of pride, ''and 1 calc'late 1 
ought ter know this section pretty thorougl 

• miles, George Harraden repeated. Be 

turned to the lirst speaker, "And you say it is li\ , 
to the place on the top of the mountains, and two mile 
yond to the land'.''' 

"'Bout that, 1 call it, from Adsom's." The oldest in- 
habitant gave a sniff of disgust. In the opinions ex- 
pressed 11, ,1 from three miles to ten. 

.Mi'. Harraden arose 'ill walk it by the mountain 
road and ascertain the correct distance." he said. 

Better tell bim sutbin 'bout Adsom, then," an old man 

The hitter nodded and e.\]ilained. 

"You see. Adsom s ben queer fer some leetle time. Jest 

wheels. 1 say. Be aint zactly crazy, though folks thought 

one time and went up there ter git him fer ter slut 
him up. They found him a plantin' corn, as sane as any of 
: I. en folks hev let him alone. Hut he has 
sort of spells like when he's most an idjit. .lest sets 
'round queer like, or gits up on the highest pint of laud he's 
got, when he -. ',,-. I think it's 

on nothin' much 'ce.pt coffee thet s done it. Ef you strike 
him when no's leclin' all right, why. like enough. 'he'll show 

the wav ter your property. Hut ef he's queer ycu 

jest keep right on pa.-t his house the waggin road stops 

il there's a trail what runs past the so.lv spring 

and Dobson'sold house. It runs 'long the ridge a wavs 

and then drops down to the . rick on t'other side." 

living in Dobson's hot 

v lis ten year. Yer see 'twas oneof 

them houses jesl built ter hie a homestid claim on the land, 

and then left. You can't miss the place where the (licks 

jme Don't know as anyone he/, seen old Adsom lately. 

Ike' " r- «»11pd to a faded personality that, apparently. 



tfireibeth <§ptbeic/mci, 

was glued to the door post, "hevn't seen nothin' of Ad- 
som lately, hev yer? The faded personality shook its 
head. "Hevn't seen anyone who hez, hev yer?" Again 
ike of the head in scared pantomime. 
i wuz up thar," a small voice piped. The owner was a 
slip of a boy, tow headed and forlorn, but possessed of a 
pair of keen, bright eyes. 
"Y'ou wuz, Eh? When?" 

"Went over thet thar way a-fishin' last week." 
"Waal, yer seed Adsom then, 1 reckon'.' " 
"No. 1 reckoned I didn't want ter, neither." 
"Why not? Aint afeared of thet harmless old critter, 

"Waal. I went inter the house ii he wasn't thar, but I 
see suthin' thar thet made me git out pretty quick." 

As if by one impulse the little group closed in around 
the speaker. Curiosity was written on the faces. The 
boy enjoyed the situation and was in no haste to draw it to 
a conclusion. 

"Waal waal, youngster, tell us what 'twas you see!" 
said his questioner impatiently. 

"1 see," the boy began with impressive slowness, "I see 
a-lyin' on the table a San Francisco paper not more'n two 
days old, and old Adsom's specs covered with dust a- 
m' up 011 the wall." 

The questioner smiled incredulously. "Fer a youugster, 
you alius were a good hand ter yarn it," was his comment. 
"Keckon you wouldn't mind yarnin' 'bout the date of the 
paper. Anyhow, Adsom's queer. 

He aint queer enough ter read without his specs," re- 
marked the landlord. "But you couldn't miss the trail ef 
you tried. " he added turning to Harraden, " 'cause it's 
the only one there is." 

Thus directed George Harraden set forth. With his 
long English stride he soon left the village far below him 
as he climbed the first rolling spurs of the ridge. There 
was something quaint about the place in spite of its crude- 
as a charm which the railroad town, for 
all its boasted daily connection with the city, could never 
possess. The scattered shake houses, with their mud and 
stick chimneys and doojyards gay with poppies had a 
charm of their own. 

The road became steeper as he ascended. When it 
turned he could get an occasional glimpse of a patch of 
pale green far above hiin on the summit, that he knew 
marked Adsom s oat held. This spot was a little to the 
south from his position, and he began wishing that he 
could reach toe top of the ridge directly above him. He 
fancied that, could be do so, he would be able to see the 
junction of the two creeks on the other side. A rough life 
■iralia and South America had bred a contempt for 
beaten tracks, and he soon struck upward through a 
grove of madrono and redwood. A sudden sharp pitch 
brought him to the top, where, as he had thought, he could 

view tl ounlry on both sides. A few yards southward 

brought him to the edge of a slope and be threw himself 
down under a tree to rest. 

Directly below him. not a hundred yards distant, was the 
little mountain farm house surrounded by its tiuy orchard 
and grain Melds. The place was a gem. There was a 
ess about the way in which it nestled in the little 
yet it commanded a view on one side of the bound- 
aries of half a dozen counties. 

"It is the embodiment of peaceful rest, this breezy, hill- 
top little faim!" George Harraden exclaimed. "One 
could live here and let the world go by." And then he be- 
gan to speculate, inconsistently, on the dull life of the 
owner. His former idea that the early settlers of Cali- 
fornia were all millionaires was somewhat shaken. 
"Fancy a man's coming here in '46, getting iand for the 
trouble of taking it up, and beine poor 10-day! " he said to 
himself in wonder. The thought was barely expressed be- 



January 9. 1S97. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



fore a figure appeared in the doorway of the hoi- 
• hat of a man. spy-class in hand." who secnu-- 
■me the country in the direction of I 
Harraden fancied from his movements that he 
fully surveying the road by which he had come. The man 
advanced to the edge of the porch and Harraden could 
not but note the elasticity of the youthful figure, which 
belied the stock of sr.ow white hair. 'A few minutes 
more and IT. no down and make his acquaintance," he 
lazily. "I must have a drink from that 
spring which I know bubbles, crystal clear, under that 
willow by the porch." 

Suddenly, the man disappeared in the house. When he 
returned he no longer held the spy-class, but in its place 
was B revolver. 

After carefully cleaning and loading the weapon, he 
placed it in his pocket and. grasping a hoe which leaned 
" against the porch, he ran like a deer to the steepest part 
of the cornfield. Harraden watched this performance 
with considerable curiosity. "Some one is coming, 
evidently," he concluded. 

Presently there came in view a lean country boy rid- 
ing a mule bareback. He hallooed to the old man several 
times before the latter gave any sign of having heard. 
"Aint seed a stray black heifer hereabouts, hev yer?" the 
boy shouted. Adsom shook his head and went on hoeing 
industriously. Harraden noticed that his back was bent 
and that he limped painfully when he moved a few steps. 
The hoy turned the mule's head and returned the way he 
had come. Adsom hoed on for a few minutes and then he 
sprang down the hillside and entered the house. There 
was something so queer about the man's actions that 
Harraden resolved not to disturb him. He could see the 
trail leading along the ridge, and he decided to make his 
way to it through the timber. 

It was beautiful in the wood. With his English ideas it 
hardly seemed possible that it could be Christmas. The 
redwood had put forth pale green tips from all its out- 
spread leaves. Clusters of the scarlet berries of the 
toyones, — the Christmas berry of California, — contrasted 
beautifully with the gray boughs of the buckeye. The 
brilliant red bark of the madrone shone as if freshly 
varnished, and the darker red of the manzanita gleamed 
like old mahogany. The sun was warm in the open spots 
where it shown on the young green grass. It was not 
winter. In California one season masquerades as each 
one of the four in turn. Was it fancy that made Harraden 
turn several times with the feeling that he was being 
followed? He saw nothing, yet the idea that a shadow 
slipped aloDg behind him from tree to tree, recurred con- 
stantly. Was it a premonition that brought to his mind 
the old warning, so familiar to him in Buenos Ayres: 
"Never allow a man behind you to approach nearer than 
fifteen feet?" 

After a little the trail plunged suddenly down a steep 
ravine, and he could see the frame of an unpainted house 
just ahead. At his feet a coppery deposit on a little 
rocky basin told him that he had reached the soda spring. 
He drew a traveling cup from his pocket and stooped to 
fill it, when something whizzed by his head. He dropped 
the cup and sprang behind the giant trunk of a laurel. 
Although armed, he was at a great disadvantage, as his 
enemy was almost directly above him on the steep hillside. 
The deserted bouse was a short distance through the 
trees and he resolved to run for it. Two more bullets 
sped after him as he dashed for the shelter; but, with the 
exception of a slight flesh wound on the left hand, he was 
unharmed. The house, gray from exposure to the weather, 
was without doors or windows, the merest broken shell of 
a dwelling. There were chinks in plenty, and through one 
of these Harraden watched the trail. That his assailant 
was old Adsom and that he was crazy he did not doubt, 
but he felt he must protect himself. He soon discovered 
the figure slipping along the wood above the house and he 
fixed upon a spot where he must pass a longer opening 
between two trees. He aimed low, not wishing to do more 
than disable him. The man fell with a cry of rage and 
Harraden saw, by his eiforts to rise, that his leg was 
broken. "Poor fellow!" he exclaimed. "He did not know 
what he was doing." 

A slight sound behind him made him turn his head, and 
the sight that met his gaze nearly stunned him. A figure 



nner roon ,rt of 

the 11 

that the n 

.i-tli floor. The I ok .>f terror on the Ca| 

Rave] I -mile. Then the truth flashed up- 

on Harraden. This must be Ihi 

who had followed bim his Impersonator. 

lion of the strange conduotof the latter a1 the farm 
nned this suspicion. A dance at the wo 

man showed hie 688, but remember -ing tfal 

was armed. Harraden resolved to make a wide detour and 

strike the trail further up the canvoi,. When he bai 

his story to the landlord of the Cloverville hotel the latter 

said one word, "Mullen! " that in a short space of time 
was repeated from one end of the country to the other. 

Men left plough and horses standing in the furroughs to 
hasten to the scene. The story of the terrible murder of 
three persons, some months previously, was retold: and 
the futile efforts of sheriffs and citizens throughout the 
State to apprehend the murderer, were recalled in detail. 

When they reached him he had been dead for some time, 
shot through the heart. His face had been cleverly made 
up in imitation of old Adsom, and beside him lav a wig of 
bushy white hair. 

"Who'd a thought it!" ejaculated the landlord. "Ike 
and Miller's boy hev ben by and spoke ter him a dozen 
times, and never knowed they wuz passin' their fortin by. 
That ere ten thousand dollars reward'll be quite a tidy 
leetle sum, Mr. Hairdon." He drew a sigh. "But he's 
gone and beat us a-killin' hisself. I wanted ter see him 
hang fur it. What I can't make out is why on airth he 
didn't kill thet tbar ole idjit? Food's ben carried ter him 
reg'lar. Must hev ben some idee he'd got 'bout compen- 
sation — his lettin' him live and carin' fer him, — when he 
could hev killed him jest as well as not." 

The Pbjiss Clipping Bobeau, &10 Montgomery street, S. P. reads an 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topios , business 
and personal. 

BANKING. 
MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, 8300,000. 

OFFICERS 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. I S. G. MURPHY, Vloe-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 

Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Prank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, 

and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Well, Fargo, & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1895 824,^2,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee.G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Pargo <Se Co., or by cheok of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual reoeipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. P. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, (1,000,000. Reserve Fund I 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31,1895 $30,727,586 59. Guaranteed Capital.. 11,200,000 

.DIRECTORS. 

B. A. BECKER President 

EDWARD KRUSE Vice-President 

DANIEL MEYER 2d Vice-President 

H. Horstman, Ign. Steinhart, Nic Van Bergen, Emil Route, H. B. Russ, 
D. N. Walter 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Abbot. Jr.- H.H.Hewlett 



Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



O. D. Baldwin 
W. S Jones 



E. J. McCutchen. 
J. B.Lincoln. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 1S»K. 

Capital Pfttd Up. t3.'">.<" Reserve Fund. 1500,000. 

Southeast Cob BTJSB and Sansome Sts. 

HEAD OFFICE *' LOMBAHD STREET, LONDON 

Bhancbes— Victoria, Vancouver New Westminster. Kamloops, Nan 
lamo. ami Nelson. British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Sandon, B, C. ; 

This Dank transacts a General Banking Busings. Account*, opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposit* received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Us Head ( (Ince and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New Yt'Ktt -Merchants' Bank of Canada; CHICAGO— First National Bank: 
LtvuMF-M. r— Nortt) and South Wales Bank: Scotland— British Linen 
Company: Iuet.anii— Bankof Ireland: Mkxico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Sodth Amkuica— I.ondon Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japah— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld; Drmkkaha and Tkinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital S3.000.000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1. 1KM). . 3.158,128 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President ICHARLESR BISHOP Vtce-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY - . , v THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. MOUI/rOB .... 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

NEW York— Messrs. Laidlaw &. Co.; the Bank of New York. N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Hank: London— Meaars. N M. Rothschild & 
Sons: Pauls— Messrs. de Rothschild Freree: Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California: Chicago — Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: acstrai ia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand; China, Japan, and I mm a— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China: St Loms— Boatman's Bank, 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York. Boston. Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland. Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London. Paris, Berlin, Bremen. Hamburg. Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm. Christ ianla. Melbourne. Sydney. Auckland. Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities fc Italy. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital .11,000,000 

sor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, S » Francisco 
Jambs K. Wilson President. Albert M/llkr. Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgim.. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe. Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E. A Bruguiere, W W. Sumner. Albert MlT 
ler Wm. P. Johnson. V H Metcalf, James K Wilson. 

Agents : New York— J. P Morgan A Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago — Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cob. Sansomb and Setter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital fci.500.000 I Paid UpCapltal 12.000.000 

Reserve Fund 1850.000 

Head OrricE 58 Old Broad Street. London 

AGENTS— New York— Acency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited. No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 1? Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

BIG GRF.ENEBATJM )„„„„„„. 
C. ALTSCHPL f Managers. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE. Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond. Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansohe Sts. 

Capital authorized W.OOO.OOO I Paid Up 11,600,000 

Subscribed 3.000,000 | Reserve Fund 700.000 

Bead Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill* 'nr collection, loans money, buyB and sells exchange 

h;n. steinhart l M ,„„ aM 

P.N. LILIENThAL [Managers 



and bullion. 



WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16.250,000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadswortn Cashier I F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

^BRANCHES. 

N. Y. City.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine. Henj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eld ridge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 



In response to many inquiries from 
all parts of the country about the 
Railway and Dock Construction 
Company 



The officials hereby give full infor- 
mation in regard to the company, 
its business and prospects. 



The company offers 20,000 shares of stock for sale in lots to unit 
purchasers at $20per share. The par value is $100 per share— full 
paid and unassessable— stockholders have no individual liability 
whatever. The company has no indebtedness of any kind— is in 
solid financial condition— and, as there are no bonds nor mortgages, 
all the earnings go to the stockholders. 

The adoption of this Company's system of construction by the 
United States Government, or any Foreign Government, or by any 
one of the lartre cities in America or Europe will cause the stock to 
rise above par ($100) immediately. 

The most conservative investors, old shrewd bear operators on the 
stock exchange, have bought this stock and confidently predict it is 
sure to pay large dividends and sell at over $200 a share as the Rail 
way and Dock Construction Co. commence business under much 
more favorable conditions than did the Bell Telephone Co., whose 
stork rose from about $10 to over 200; or the original Edison Electric 
Co., whose stock rose from 45 to $3000 a share, or the many other 
companies owning useful inventions whose stocks rose rapidly in 
value while paying large dividends to the alert original investors. 

Many prominent men in banking, railway and financial circles 
and Other expert judges of stock values predict that this stock will 
pay large dividends and will sell at over $200 per share for the 
following reasons: 

The Railway and Dock Construction Company controls all the 
rights titles, patents and interests in and the sole, absolute and ex- 
right to manufacture and sell the new indestructible piles 
that do away altogether with the millions of wooden piles heretofore 
need I very where, which only last a short time, as alternate moisture 
and drying and the marine wormssoon de.-iroy the wood, and leave 
a deceptive shell, incapable to sustain a load that requires the full 
strength of the original pile. Old wooden piles must be continually 
d at great expense. 

Notbiug can compete with the indestructible Pile in ihe construc- 
tion of piers, docks, bulkheads, sea-walls, foundations for bridges. 
Lighthouses, jetties, breakwaters or other improvements in riveis, 
harbors or on to| Bea coast. 

This pile isan absolute necessity in railway trestlework as ii 
guarantees safety, and it will !ast forever, and trie;.- is an enor"*' us 
demand for it. 

< 'in- defective wooden pile derailing a train causes a loss of many 
thousands of dollars in lives and property destroyed. 

Applications are pouring in from engineers, contractors and rail- 
way officials all over the United States. These men are quick to see 
the certainty of profit. They are perhaps better able to judge than 
others, because, out of a total of 1*01 railroads, 373 of these railway 
companies are now preparing to build 20,647 miles of ne w line. The 
great superiority of the Railway and Dock Construction Company's 
oi of solid, substantial, indestructible trestle work is causing 
the demand in this special field. 

Estimated earnings from this one source of profit will pay $7 per 
share annual dividends— this is equal to 35 per cent, cash dividends 
per year on stock bought now at present price of $20 per share. 

Other and larger sources of profit will come from contracts now in 
view, vis:— 

In place of the old wooden docks, covered by temporary sheds, 
which now disfigure the waterfronts of our cities, this company will 
build solid, indestructible piers, on which permanent iron, stone or 
brick buildings are put up just the same as on land. 

Private owners of dock property as well as dock officials in the 
numerous cities are becoming aware of the great advantage of using 
the Railway and Dock Construction Company's system of building 
indestructible piers to make a solid foundation, upon which large 
buildings can be erected, from which they can get big revenues for 
rental 1 

000,000 have already been expended in improving Southern 
harbors and their approaches. 

In projects now under way over fifty million dollars will be spent 
in improving navigation in rivers, bays, etc., throughout the coun- 



January 9, 1897. 






jetties, breakwater*, and older «.rk in which the ln.li 
blr Tile is a Rr»»' • 

The city ol Xrw York profiii* the 

city water front. 

la a 
the Bo 
fortune in ■ ,,.•• 

Td ' mended the expenditure 

ity million dollars for 1!.. 
ten millions a year will I 

The I'nit. ; at about $1", in di 

in* the entrance of the V 

work, which will be supplanted in ruture i<v the Railway a: 

pended nn the iwiiimnic. m the na> , th.-v 

■re simply loose rock damped into the water. Each 
IK mill > a continuous pyramid tUO feet wide at the 

bottom. tapering; to 15 feet wide al the top above the water, The 
Railway and Dock Construction Company bnlld indestructible 
jetties of the tl the bottom as the top ami save thl 

mous waste of stone and labor. 

The "St. Louis Critic" strongly advocates the adoption of this 
pany's system of indestructible jellies to deepen the Mississippi al 
BL Loots. 

To provide additional funds to execute some of this work, the 
company offers 20,000 shares to the public in lots to suit at the 
low price of $20.00 per share in order to have the stock quickly 
taktn. Thereare no salaried officials. Tbe money derived from the 
sale of stock, when not used in profitable construction work, remains 
in the company's treasury. 

Many leading marine engineers and experts say: "This com- 
pany's system of construction is coming into universal use in build- 
ing all improvements in rivers and harbors." 

As the business in sight is too large for this company to handle 
alone, tbe subsidiary companies now being organized in the 
principal States each pay a certain amount in cash and one-third 
of their capital stock into the Railway and Dock Construction Co.'s 
treasury. In addition to large sums in cash the company will re- 
ceive about $20,000,000 in securities in this way, on which dividends 
will be paid from the earnings of the subsidiary companies. These 
dividends all go to the holders of Railway an I Dock Construction 
stock. 

With a large surplus and an ample cash working capital the com- 
pany will hold assets of $200 per share for each share now offered at 
$20 when all details are completed. 

Application will be made to list the shares on the stock exchange. 

Owing to the financial depression and uncertainty before the elec- 
tion the Railway and Dock Construction Company would not accept 
numerous contracts for work amounting to about three millions of 
dollars. They were offered first mortgage bonds in payment but the 
bonds could not be sold at that time in New York or London at 
satisfactory prices. English bankers are now negotiating to y'~"° a 
large block of Railway and Dock Construction stock and apply 
for an official quotation on the London Stock Exchange. 

Tbe officials and large stockholders are well-known practical 
financiers and business men, whose names are at once a synonym for 
trustworthy, capable management and a guarantee that any stock 
in which they invest is safe, solid and profitable. Among them are 

Among the stockholders are: 

Geo. W. Dunn, Esq.. president of the company, head of the bank- 
ing house of George W. Dunn & Co., New York, and president, 
director and trustee of other corporations ; he has been prominent in 
Wall Street for 20 years as a careful level-beaded financier; Hon. 
Thomas Murphy, vice-president, ex-Senator, Collectorof the port of 
New York under President U. S. Grant; R. A. B. Dayton. Esq., 
counsel for the company, Temple Court, New York; Eupene Harvey, 
Esq., second vice-president, banker, Drexel building, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; R. M. Stanbrough, E-q.. Kingston, N. Y. ; George D. Hilyard. 
Esq., contractor, N. Y.; W. R. Childs, Esq., of the Calumet and 
Hecla Copper Company, Calumet, Mich.; Edward A. Wilson, Esq.. 
secretary ; M. Hoff. assistant secretary ; George B. Sbelborn, Esq., 
receiver, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa and Memphis Railway Co., 
Montgomery, Ala : Y. Carryer, Esq., of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company. Field, B. C, Canada; Howard Swineford, Esq., of 
Howard Swineford & Co. Richmond, Va.; Jacob Deyo, cashier, 
Huguenot Bank, New Paltz.N. Y.; S. J. Giffbrd, Dunkirk, N. Y.. 
and several rich and influential railway and political magnates who 
will have seats in the Board of Directors later on. 

Address all applications for stock and remit for the number of 
shares wanted to the Financial Agents of the company, Messrs, 



GEO. W, DUNN & CO., 



2 Wall St., 



New York. 



by check, draft, money order, registered letter or by express; or 
have the stock sent by express C. O. D. 

The right is reserved to reject any application for stock, and to 
allot only a part of the shares applied for, and to advance the price 
w.thout notice. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO, 



309 and 311 Saniom* S 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fue and Manne Insurance Agents. 

San Ftanotco, C» 



FINDLAY. DURHAM AM 1.1 anil )HThrt<vlr,rr.llf- St.. London 
SIMPSON. MACKIRDY * . » South Castle St.. Liverpool 



INSURANCE. 



KIKK. KARENS, ANI> INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California St., S. P. 
Fire insurance. 

Founded A. D. 178? 

Insurance Company of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 83,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. P. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD, 

Capital Paid Up 11,000.000 

Assets 3,192.001 . 69 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,506,409.41 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 
B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 5 oi Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OP AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825 

Capital, J2.250.00U Total Assets, 16,854,653 65. 

UNITED STATE EPARTMETTT: 204 Sansome St., S. P. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ■"•mwm* «■. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated™ 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Oeneral Agents, 
413 California St., S. P. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO,, LIMITED, 

OP LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 816 California St., S. P 

nf? RirTIRn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genu 
L/n. niv^wnL-' o ine— A specific tor Exhausted Vitality, Physical- 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by tbe Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Paoiflc States. 
J. Q. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, 81 25; of 100 pills, 82; of 200 pills, 
83 50; of 400 pills, 86; Preparatory Pills. 82. Send for circular. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1897. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 

{PACxric Systsm.) 
Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 
SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ 



From January l, it&7. 



t Arrive 



•6:00 A Nlles, Sao Jose, and way stations 8:45 a 
7:00 a Atlantic Express Ogden and East 8:45 P 
7:00 a Benlcla, Vacavllle, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Orovllle, and Redding, 

vhi Davis 6:45 P 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 

Napa, Cahstoga. and Santa Rosa 0:15 P 
8:30a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento. Marvsville, Chico, 

Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:15 p 

•8:30 a Peters and Milton *7:15P 

0:00a New Orleans Express, Raymond 
(for Yosemite), Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los An- 

geles, Deming, El Paso, New 
rleans, and East.... 4:45 p 

:00 A Martinez and Stockton 4 :45 P 

9:00 A Vallejo 6:1a P 

Nlles, San Jose Livermore, and 

Stockton 7:15P 

•1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:0UP 

l:00r Nilcs. San Jose, and Livermore.. 8:45A 
fl:30P Port Costa and Way Stations.... t7:45P 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Callstoga, El Verano and 
Santa Rosa 9:15 A 

4:00p Benicia, Vacavllle, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysvllle, 
Orovllle, and Sacramento 11:15a 

4:30p Lathrop. Stockton, Modesto, Mer- 
ced, and Fresno, going via Nilcs, 
returning via Martinez 11:45a 

5:00P Los Angeles Express, Tracy, 
Fresno, Santa Barbara, and Los 
Angeles . 10.45 a 

5:00 P Santa Fe Route. Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45A 

6:00 P European mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45 A 

6:00 P Haywards, Nlles and San Jose... 7:45 A 
J7 :00 P Vallejo t7 :45 P 

7 :00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysvllle, Redding, Portland, 
Puget Sound and East 11:15 a 

J10:00p "Sunset Limited." Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans, 
and East gl8:45P 

Santa Cbdz Division (N arrow Gauge). 

8:15a Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, 
Felton, BoulderCreek, SantaCruz 
and way stations 5:60 P 

*2:15p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *11 :20i 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gaios 9:50 A 

til :45p Humors' Excursion, San Jose 

and way stations 17:20p 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:46 a 

8:16A 



San Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only) 1:30 p 

San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Roble*\ San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and 

Srlnclpal way stations 7:00 p 
an Jose and way stations 5:00 p 

11:30 a Palo Alto and way stations 3:30 P 

•2:30 P San Mateo. Menlo Park. San Jose, 
Gilroy. Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove *10:40a 

*3:30 P San Jose and way stations 9:45 a 

•4:30p SanJoseand WayStatlons *8:06 A 

6:30 p San Jose and principal way 

stations *8:45 A 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:35 a 

til :45P San Jose and waystatlons |7:45p 



San Leandbo and Haywards Local. 



Melrose. 
Seminary Park, 
Fitchburg, 
San Leandko. 
and 
Haywards 



l Runs through to Nlles. 
/ From Niles 



i«eoo ai 


BsOOA 


9:c»ia 


10:00 a 


ill. 00 A 


2:00 p 


3:00 P 


4:00 P 


6:00 P 


6:30 p 


7:00 P 


8:00 P 


9:00 P 


ttll:16PJ 



7:I6A 


(9:45 


A 


10:46 


A 


11:46 


A 


12:46 


P 


n :4S 


f 


4:15 


P 


5.45 p 


6:15 


P 


7:45 


P 


8:46 


P 


9:45 


P 


10:60 


P 


.t112:O0 p 



CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 

(Slip 8). 

•7:15.9:00, and 11:00 a. m., }1:0Q, "2:00, I3:00, 
*4 :00, 15 :00 and "6 :00 P. H. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway. 

•6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. M.; 112:00, •1:00, t2:00, 
«3jOCi . ■ M. 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

{Sundays only. 
ft Monday. Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Tuesdays and Saturdays 

|Sundays and Thursdays. 

The PAciric Transfer Company will eall for 

and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
Other Information. 



FOUND WANTING. 

Jeanne d'Arc lacked education ; 
Pompadour lacked depth of mind; 

Main tenon lacked toleration : 
Esther might have been more kind, 

Hebrew Sarah lacked humaneness; 

< Miod Octa via wanted wit; 
Creek Xantippe lacked urbaneness; 

Eliot wasn't chic a bit. 

Cleopatra lacked humility ; 

Ruth was minus wordly wealth ; 
Bess of England lacked civility; 

Saint Theresa lacked in health. 

Aspasia lacked in social station ; 

Paula lacked in style and fashion ; 
De Stael lacked domestication; 

Phryne didn't lack in passion. 
Poll is perfect, but, you see, 

Lacks in toto love for me. 

-Cincinnati Tribune. 



WHY HE PROPOSED. 

"Well," said Miss Hungerfonl to Mr. 
Gildersleeve, as they sat on the piazza of a 
summer hotel and looked about them, not- 
ing the other guests with critical eye, 
"when I am married— if I ever am married 
— 1 shall not march straight from the altar 
and put myself on exhibition at a summer 
resort.'' 

"That is a commendable resolution," 
replied Mr. Gildersleeve. 

"Just notice the three or four honey- 
mooning couples at this hotel now." 

"I've noticed them, and, do you know, 
I've rather envied the bridegrooms." 

"Have you? Well. 1 haven't envied the 
brides. 1 don't believe in public lovemaking 
either before or after marriage." 

"The honey-mooners here seem to enjoy 
it, and it furnishes a great deal of amuse- 
ment to some of the old married people." 

"Well, no one will ever obtain amuse- 
ment at my expense in that way," Miss 
Hungerford went on. -'I consider newly 
wedded affection too sacred a thing to be 
exhibition." 

"Of course you are right, Miss Hunger- 
ford, precisely right." 

"Now, when I am married." Miss Hunger- 
fonl proceeded, "I am going straight to my 
dear old aunt's place in the Catskills. It's 
the finest retreat imaginable iu the hot 
Bummer days. 1 usually go there to rest up 
after a month at the shore. Perfect solitude 
you know, the nicest cottage, with well- 
trained servants. You can lie in the ham- 
mock all day long and breathe the most 
delicious air. Then you can row on the 
dearest little lake, and take the most de- 
lightful walks, with no danger <>i aiiybodgfl 
intruding on your privacy. When I was 
there last summer, aunty dear said: 'Now, 
Annie, when you get married, I want you 
to come straight here with your husband 
and enjoy your honeymoon as it ought to 
be enjoyed. You and he are welcome to 
stay a month, or two if you like; the longer 
the better.' Now, don't you think it would 
be much better to spend a honeymoon in a 
place like that than at a crowded watering 
place like this, Mr. Gildersleeve?" 

"Indeed, I do, MiSfl Hungerford." He 
moved nearer to her and added: "Annie, 
love, let's start right away." 

"Ob, George, this is so Very sudden! 1*11 
need at least two weeks to get ready for the 
wedding.' 1 

She was ready iu time, however, and now 
they are at her aunt's.— Harper's Bazar. 







iCEANICS.S. CO. /> days to 

1 HAWAII. SAMOA, L*, HONOLULU 

NEW ZEALAND, J 1 bv 

AUSTRALIA \J S-S. AUSTRALIA. 

S. S. "Zealandia," Thursday, January ?tli, at 
2 p. K. 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 
January 96, at 2 p. m 

Line to Goolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. J. D SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. , 
Agents, 11-1 Montgomery St. Freight office, IK7 
Market St.. San Francisco. 

flie - Grand Pacific, S?. 8 £2» 

MRS ELLA CORBETT, Proprietress. 
Furnished rooms by the day, week, or month. 
Telephone: Grant, 507. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY CO. 

Tibukon Fbhky- Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 A M; 12:35,3:30 
5:10, 6:30 p m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11:30 PM. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00a m; 1:30 3:30, 5:00, 
6:20 PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:15, 7:50, 9:20, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 
3:40, 5: 10 PM. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:53 
and 6:35 p m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AM; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:25 P M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 

same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 1 In Effect 


ARRIVE IN S. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays. | DESTI . TIOK . 


Sundays.! g^ek 


7:30am 
3:30pm 
5:10 PM 


8:00AM 
9:30 am 
5:O0pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 8:40am 
6:10 pm 10:25am 
7 :35 P M 6 :22pm 






Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyserville, 

Cloverdale. 










10.25 AM 










3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 


7:35PM 


6:22pm 



7:30 AM 


8:00am 


Pleta. Hop- 
land, Uklah. 


7:35PM 


6 :22PM 


7:30ami 
8:S0pm| 


8:00am 


Guernevllle 


7:35 PM 


10 25AM 
6:22 PM 


7:30AM| 
5:10pm| 


8:00am 
5:00pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40 AM 
6:10pm 


|8:40AM 
|6 :22 P M 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


8:O0am 
5:00pm 


Sebastopol. 


10:40am 
6:10pm 


110:25AM 

!6 :22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay and Lake- 
port; at Hopland for Lakeport and Bar t let t 
Springs; at Uklah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs. Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper 
Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day's, River- 
side. Lierley's, Bucknell's Sashedoio Heights, 
Hullville, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City. Fort Bragg, Westport, 
Usal, Willi tts, Cahto, Covelo, Laytonville, Har- 
ris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 

H.C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN, 



Gen. Manager. 



Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf. San Fran- 
cisco for ports in Alaska. 9 a.m.. Jan. i'. 24. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan. 4, 9, 
14, 19, 24, SB, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer ''Pom- 
ona," at 2 P. M. Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20. 24, 28, and 
every fourth day thereafter. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a. M. ; Jan. 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 
28. and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. h. 

ForEnsenada, Magdalena Bay, San Jose del 
Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La Paz. Santa Rosalia, 
and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 
A. m, 25th of each month. 

The company reserves right to change steam- 
ers or sailing dates . 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO 
For Japan and China. 
Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 1 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 

HONGKONG, calling at Kobe (Hiogo). Naga- 
saki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo re- 
celi ed on board on day of sailing. 
COPTIC (via Honolulu).. ..Saturday, Jan. 16, 1897 

(via Honolulu) Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1897 

DORIC Tuesday, February 23, 1897 

Gaelic (via Honolulu). Saturday, March 13, 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 
For freight or passage apply at Company's 
Office, No. 421 Market street, corner First. 



D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 







94.00. 



S *N rRANClt 0tt 



NE WS M E TITER 




Vol.LlV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 16. 1897. 



Number 3. 



Printed and Puhlitt,,.! trery Saturday fry Ins proprietor, FRKD MARRIOTT 
5>, ran) itr<>\ San Francisco. Kntertd at San Francisco Pott. 
ojlcs 04 Second-class Matter. 

The office of the SIMS LETTER in Srtr Tort City is at Templs Court; 
and at Chicago. 903 Boycs Building. {Frank E Morrison 
Rfpresentatire), tchere information mat be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and adrertistng rates. 



01 R fruit growers are finding out that robins arc 
among their best friends. These birds, if unmol 
may do the State more good than a costlv Horticultural 
Commission. 



T" 



HE Rev. George Swan of Berkeley very sensibly ob- 
jects to the study of classic mythology "in the public- 
schools. Bultinch's "Age of Fable" is a highly interesting 
book, but something more useful should engage the at- 
tention of the pupils. 



INTEREST in the Nicaragua Canal project seems to be 
reviving at Washington. There is a prospect that a 
measure will be adopted at this session, calling for a re- 
survey of the canal line, with provisions for construction 
work under the direction of the Government. 



IT is announced that an important move has been made 
in Judge Coffey's court, as a result of which a speedy 
settlement will be reached of a large estate. This move 
must have been an oversight on the part of the attorneys, 
but such things cannot always be guarded against in the 
practice of law. 

IT was an absurd thing to close the public schools for 
half a day, on account of the death of School Director 
Halsted. He had never served in that capacity, and 
even if be had been a life-long member of the Board there 
would be no occasion for wasting the time of teachers and 
children in this manner. 



IT is to be hoped that Senator Proctor's proposed con- 
stitutional amendment, increasing the Presidential 
term to six years, and making the President ineligible for 
re-election, will be approved by Congress and ultimately 
become law. It also increases the term of Representa- 
tives to three years, which is likewise a desirable change. 

IN the unholy scramble for tariff benefits at Washington, 
nearly all interests appear to be clamorously repre- 
sented, except those of the consumer. If this State has 
to submit to an increased duty on coal, it will go far to 
neutralize any gains that may be made through higher 
duties on fruit. San Francisco, in particular, must suffer 
from dearer coal. 



IN insisting that the Grand Jury has no right to inquire 
into the expenditures of the school department, with 
the view to detect extravagance or waste, Superintendent 
Babcock has but excited suspicion against the school 
Board. If the public money is being wisely expended, 
there is no reason why the Grand Jury should not be 
allowed to make known that interesting fact. 

S KANSAS legislator has framed a bill designed to pre- 
vent any man from owning more land than may be 
embraced in a homestead. It authorizes anybody to make 
a tender of money for land, other than a homestead, and 
if the offer is refused the proper amount is determined in 
court by a jury, which sum the owner is obliged to accept. 
This is lending the power of eminent domain to take pri- 
vate property for private uses, and is clearly in conflict 
with the federal constitution. 



TBAT iraham Lincoln, the most truly demo- 

cratic, in , our Presidents, should 

become the leader of the n Ive sel o( Chici 

v. Is a striking example of the mutability of fan 
in America. 



T BE outrage .it Orangevale, in Sacramento County, 
where six Japanese laborers were strung up by the 

neck and nearly killed, by a mob of white rul 
most disgraceful. Such cowardly assaults on inoffensive 
foreigners cast infinite discredit upon California. 
newspapers that falsely represent our labor interests as 
endangered by the Japanese are the chief promoters of 
this sort of mischief. 

NO great degree of enthusiasm has been excited by the 
memorial asking Congress to establish a leper hospi- 
tal in this State. There seems to be need of such an in- 
stitution somewhere in the United States, but San Fran- 
ciscans are certainly not anxious to have it established in 
this neighborhood. This is not from fear of infection, but 
because of the gloomy associations that must always sur- 
round a hospital of this sort. 

THE Populist Party is shouting for greenbacks as the 
cure-all of financial ills. Its leaders declare that they 
took up the silver fight as the entering wedge for their 
main issue of paper money. The proposed retirement of 
the greenbacks in circulation will give the Populists oppor- 
tunity for talk on this subject. But it is quite certain 
that the fiat money idea has no strength in Congress. The 
country is in no danger from this sort of visionary finance. 

THERE is not so much need of more courts in Califor- 
nia as of a reform of legal procedure by which a final 
determination of law suits could be speedily obtained at 
reasonable cost. The law's delays are proverbial, but 
most of them are needless and inexcusable. It i3 probable 
that more substantial justice was had in the old English 
market-place courts, where every cause was finally de- 
cided on the day it arose, than is attained through the 
complicated machinery of our modern courts. 

THE Bates dredger, which has proved so effective on 
the Mississippi river, differs chiefly in the matter of 
capacity from the Bowers or Von Schmidt dredger, well- 
known in California. The principle of stirring up the bot- 
tom, and lifting the liquified mud by suction, is the same 
in both. It is not unlikely that the Legislature will ap- 
propriate a sum sufficient for the purchase of a big dred- 
ger of this sort, to be used on the Sacramento river. It 
would be a good investment for the State. 

THE prominence given the arrest of Murderer Butler, 
by the sensational portion of the daily press, must be an 
eye-opener to the foreign officers who are mixed up in a 
hurly-burly of excitement which must be new to them, 
considering the matter-of-fact manner in which these af- 
fairs are handled in other parts of the world. Keeping 
the unfortunate strangers cooped up in uncomfortable 
quarters on a wharf, with telephonic communication avail- 
able with all the hotels, is not the least ridiculous feature 
of the situation. Morever, instead of sending a revenue 
cutter out to herald the arrest of a "dangerous man," it 
would seem that the pilot boat could have simplified the 
whole matter by a letter of instructions to the captain of 
the vessel, who, between the cruising ground and the 
coast, could easily find an opportunity to clap the unsus- 
pecting murderer in irons, for safe delivery to the police 
in waiting. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 



THE FUNDING BILL DEFEATED. 

SFRAID to deal conservatively with a measure in which 
large money interests were involved, and in regard to 
which the possibilities of suspicion and scandal were great, 
the House of Representatives has defeated the Pacific 
Railroads funding bill. From a California standpoint, we 
continue to think it an unwise decision, acd we venture 
the prediction that the day will come when our people 
would reverse that decision, if they could. If two per cent 
payment by the Roads on the amount of the Government's 
lien was insufficient, how much better off will our shippers 
be when the Roads are sold to the highest bidder? No 
syndicate would put money into such an enterprise with 
the expectation of earning less than four per cent per an- 
num. That, of course, means that the net earnings must 
be double what would have sufficed under the proposed 
funding bill. That is the kerne! of this much misrepre- 
sented railroad question. So long as arithmetic has any 
value, four will remain twice as much as two, and the 
doubling of the interest on the Pacific Railroads' debt will 
mean the collection of a great many more millions a year 
from our people. What there is in that to grow wildly 
enthusiastic over no sane man can tell. That the railroad 
has necessarily made enemies, and has been fought, not 
because of the injustice of its cause, but because of the 
malice and hatred it has begotten, goes without saying. It 
is a fatal trick we have in California to hate every man 
and institution that succeeds. We never, for instance, 
permit one of ourselves to rise to importance in national 
politics, or to become a cabinet minister. If, perchance, 
a President-elect intimates that he would like to draw one 
of his official family from the Pacific Coast, we at once 
start in to destroy every man of mark, and invariably 
finish up by recommending a colorless man, who will 
ne"er amount to much. We are too jealous one of another 
to re-elect our congressmen often enough for them to 
learn the ropes, and become useful to their constituents 
and to the country. We are so equally divided politically 
that we cut the singular figure of chosing electors favor- 
able to both Presidential candidates. As a rule, when the 
rest of the country goes Republican we are Democratic 
and when the Democrats are on top and something is to be 
gained from them, we usually have some weakling con- 
gressmen in Washington making puny attacks upon the 
powers that be, and rendering everything Californian 
obnoxious. If we did not like the proposed funding bill, it 
would have been the part of wisdom to have gone into 
consultation with railroad officials to find out what could 
have been done, and, in the last resort, to have delivered 
them an ultimatum. 

Reason should always hold sway when large material in- 
terests are involved. We see how that is in the case of 
millionaire stockholders who have much to lose. They 
may say hard things of the other fellow, and hate him like 
poison, but they take care to "get together" in the end 
and combine for mutual protection. Whoever else loses 
they win, and so go on from one triumph to another. 
There was every reason why the people of California and 
the railroad men should have come together. It was to 
the interest of this Coast that the best possible terms 
should have been made, always, provided, that the rail- 
road gave guarantees that its customers should adequat- 
ely share in the easy terms obtained. That could all have 
been arranged by consultation and agreement and a way 
could have been found to render it binding. Every dollar, 
in either interest or principal, that Congress consented to 
throw off the original debt, would have been in the nature 
of a dollar subsidy granted to the traffic of this Coast. 
The disposition of the rest of the country was highly 
favorable to helping this section in that way. A just and 
liberal view was held of the subject matter. It was felt 
that the men who built the Pacific railroads in the first 
place, and the men who are building up a commonwealth 
on these shores, were worthy not only of just, but even of 
generous treatment. It was not forgotten that the bonds 
upon which dollar for dollar, with interest at the rate of 
six per cent is now demanded, were sold originally for no 
more than sixty cents on the dollar. It was also remem- 
bered that the prices of rails and other material were 
two or three times greater then than now. The road was 
undertaken as a national necessity. It has accomplished 



The Examiner and 
Grove L. Johnson. 



all and more than was expected of it. It has brought all 
parts of the country together, led the Indian difficulty to a 
peaceful end, rendered California and its wonders access- 
ible to the world, and has in one way and another saved 
the Government more monev than the amount of the bonds 
it guaranteed. With these and other like considerations 
in view, there was every disposition in the East to have 
forgiven the entire debt, if only California bad desired it. 
But our people were not that way minded. Led by per- 
sons actuated by hatred, malice, and all unchantableness. 
they preferred revenge, even if railroad chaos should re- 
sult To foreclose is easier said than done. If accom- 
plished, the Government will have a white elephant on its 
hands. The end is not yet. 

One can readily understand why the 
Examiner saw fit to mutilate and 
suppress the speech of Grove L. John- 
son at Washington, wherein that gentleman treated the 
youthful Mr. Hearst to as excoriating and just a roast as 
it has ever been the fortune of a man to receive. Had some 
demagogue, purchased, perhaps not by gold, but by the 
plaudits of a number of illiterate and prirciple-ignoring 
Californians, been speaking, and had be seen fit to throw 
bouquets at that paragon of moneyed journalists, then we 
should have been treated to the speech in full, with a few 
extra remarks thrown in by some pandering editorial 
writer. As it was, Mr. Hearst was shown up in his true 
colors and as every intelligent Californian sees him. Mr. 
Johnson properly decided to explain to the nation's repre- 
sentatives and Easterners in general, that men of the 
Hearst and Sutro type are not good specimens of 
Western civilization, but that they are merely the well- 
clothed leaders of a minority, whose chief claim to con- 
sideration lies in its very offensiveness. Time was when the 
ravings of Mr. Sutro and the virtuous indignation of Mr. 
Hearst were not without effect. Demagogues and dogs 
must have their day. and always attract attention until 
disposed of. The fall of these two gentlemen came when 
people asked themselves : "What has either of them given 
us as compared to the railroad they both decry ? " The 
one, a Hebrew adventurer, gave the mining world a tun- 
nel, in exchange, however, for millions, and the deal will 
cause the righteous abuse of the purchasers to follow his 
gold-greedy ghost even into Gehenna; the other, a sprig of 
our own soap-sud aristocracy, has given us a newspaper 
whose apparent mission has been, and is, to blast every legi- 
timate California industry, to picture us as a race of male 
and female desperadoes, as foes to virtue, to decency, and 
to right, and to damn us generally in the eyes of the world. 
Congressman Johnson is entitled to the thanks of all true 
Californians for the service he has rendered us in turning 
the searchlight of investigation upon these two men, and in 
holding them up to public scorn. That the Examiner refused 
to print his speech was not to be wondered at. It is as 
much the enemy to truth as it is to this fair State of Cali- 
fornia. 



Progress Of The The National Civil Service Reform 
Reform League has just held its annual session 

in Civil Service, in Philadelphia. Most remarkable 
progress was shown in the reports 
and addresses. The first movement toward reform was 
made during Grant's second term. It failed because the 
spoilsmen were too strong. During the administration 
following it was introduced into the Interior Department 
at Washington, and in the Custom House and Post Office 
at New York. From that time the growth has been rapid, 
although it has faced the continual opposition of pro- 
fessional politics. The present law was passed in 1882. 
At the close of 1884, there were less than 15,000 govern- 
ment employees in the classified service. At the present 
time there are nearly 90,000. New York and Massa- 
chusetts have adopted the system in State government, 
and Pennsylvania is expected to pass a law for the same 
purpose at the present session of her Legislature. The 
City of Chicago introduced the merit system by a majority 
of 50,000 votes, indicating its popularity with the people. 
The plan has either been already adopted, or movements 
are under way looking to that end in the cities of New 
Orleans, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Denver, Seattle, 
Tacoma, Galveston, St. Louis and Wheeling, W. Va. 



January 16, 1897. 



l.KTTI-R. 



Ibstanding this firm hold I be efforts of the - 
men .. II desperate, and wh.. 

methods are insidious. Doable as they 
reform openly, their effort- . lining, 

•cious arguments, from tl ■ 
the adoption of such rules and amendmenta as tend t.< 

■y the real intent of the Ian Btr ry, an 

association has been formed in New York with this 
avowed purpose. Strenuous efforts are being made by 
them to transfer the management of civil service examina- 
tions from the Commission to heads of departments, lb* 
effect of which would be to destroy the merit system in 
any department controlled by a spoilsman. They demand 
that heads of departments shall have the right to approve 
or amend questions. This is equally insidious, [fas 
man with appointments to make, knows the questions, his 
heelers will know them also and their answers too. They 
require the right to make appointments from the whole 
list of eligibles instead of from the highest three in grade, 
as at present. As the minimum of the grades on the 
eligible list is seventy per cent, a compliance with this 
proposal would sacrifice the purpose of the law to award 
appointments to merit as shown in competitive examina- 
tion. ^ These demands should clearly not be granted and 
the National League will do good "work if they compass 
their prompt denial. There are already rules adopted 
which are unjust to merit and serve as entering wedges 
for the spoilsmen. To illustrate: the people will be best 
served if the most meritorious eligible has the widest 
chance of appointment to the public service. An appli- 
cant, we will suppose, entered the examinations in April 
1896, for a certain grade in the Customs service. He has 
gained the highest percentage in the list of eligibles. 
Now the law does not permit his appointment to the ser- 
vice except in the grade for which he applies, and yet 
after his position on the list was obtained, the Commission 
promulgated a new rule that " any employee may be pro- 
moted or transferred to the lowest class in any other 
grade, upon passing a non-competitive examination." 
That is to say, the eligible with a standing of 98 per cent, 
may be shouldered to one side, to clear the way of a favor- 
ite who gains seventy per cent in a non-competitive ex- 
amination. He spends time and money to gain bis place 
on the list on the faith of the law that it would be of value. 
What right has the Commission to destroy thatcompact by 
a retroactive rule? It is clearly an injustice to him, de- 
trimental to the public service, valuable only to the poli- 
tician and his protege, and should be rescinded before the 
breach made is widened by the spoilsmen. 

The question of the future of 
Canada shows signs of becoming 
a very interesting one in the 
near future, not only ftr the Dominion, but for the United 
States. Two parties are rapidly forming in Canada — one 
favoring an imperial federation with the mother country 
and her colonies; the other urging a closer union with the 
United States — a sentiment which is sure to develop into 
a desire for annexation. The reasons for the present un- 
rest are plain. Manitoba is notoriously displeased with 
her associates. To begin with, she is situated deplorably. 
Cut off from both ends of the Dominion by immense tracts 
of desolate and practically uninhabitable areas; over- 
ridden by Imperialism and Railwayism, and coerced from 
Ottawa, it is not surprising that her eyes turn longingly 
to the South. Ontario and Quebec are little better off. 
The proposed federation would be sure to cast upon them 
a largely increased burden for military and naval pur- 
poses, while it would deprive them in a large measure of 
the independence they now have. In the meantime, they 
see the most energetic portion of their population per- 
manently removing to the United States in steadily in- 
creasing numbers. To sacrifice themselves to the inter- 
ests of England and Australia would not in any way bet- 
ter their condition. But what of the United States? The 
very reasons which are increasing the popularity of annex- 
ation in Canada, joined with others, are the very reasons 
which would make Canada an undesirable acquisition for 
us. The Dominion cannot offer us a quid pro quo. There 
are extensive wheat lands in her middle West, but it is 
noticeable that they are not attracting a large popula- 
tion, and we have already more of such land than we can 



Canadian Independence 
and Annexation. 



sow with profit. Then- are, undouh: mines in 

the burden • bringing . 

lent in assets 1 • 

It would add to our present difficulties with I 

oental railways. It would add to our citlieushlp a large 

-■i( thought 
are wholly sntai ■ -pint of our tnstltutloi 

people as difficult for us to assimilate as would be the 

Spanish races of the West Indies or the Kanakas of the 

Pacific, Were the increased land area desirable, the 

not exhibit so much willingness to leave 

it. We COUld purchase the most of it DOW for one-half the 
money they have put into it. If it is of so little value to 
them. why. then, should wo covet it? it would add noth- 
ing to our greatness and much to our burdens. We have 
land enough, debts enough, and troubles enough, and neither 
of the four cardinal points can offer us an adequate reason 
for extending our domain. 

Improving The It is one of the most promising signs in 
Electoral American politics that our people, when- 
Feanchise. ever and wherever appealed to, have 
shown more than willingness to improve 
the conditions upon which the electoral franchise is exer- 
cised. Two years ago the people of California carried a 
constitutional amendment, by a large majority, empower- 
ing the Legislature to impose an educational qualification 
as a pre-requisite to voting. At the election in November 
last two States submitted constitutional amendments to 
popular vote, rendering the exercise of the suffrage more 
difficult to foreign immigrants. Hitherto Texas has al- 
lowed all comers to vote who have resided in the State 
one year, provided that on the day of election, or before, 
they declared an intention to become citizens. The last 
Legislature submitted a proposition that such a declara- 
tion must be made not less than six months before the 
election, and it carried by an almost unanimous vote. 
Minnesota has permitted foreigners to vote upon a simple 
declaration of intention, but an amendment was carried 
at the late election requiring full citizenship; which of 
course, means a residence of five years. That such a 
proposal should have succeeded in Minnesota is remark- 
able, because six-tenths of the population of that State 
are of foreign birth. Last, but not least, Congress has 
imposed an educational qualification as a necessity to all 
immigrants who would land on our shores. That measure 
has been generally acquiesced in and approved. These 
signs of a conservative trend in the popular mind, will 
give no little satisfaction to thoughtful men everywhere. 
To be sure, these amendments fall very far short of what 
is needed, but they are to be welcomed as indicating pro- 
gress in the right direction. 

Republican Times have changed since a newly-elected 
Simplicity. President of the United States rode down 
to the Capitol alone, hitched his horse to a 
post, was sworn in, returned as he came, and thus ended 
the inaugural ceremony. All accounts from Washington 
indicate that President-elect McKinley is to be inaugu- 
rated with a degree of pomp and splendor that will put in 
the shade all previous occasions of like nature. The 
Springfield Republican is the respectable authority for 
the statement that " prices for windows on Pennsylvania 
avenue, on inauguration day, are rising rapidly. Latest 
quotations: single windows, $75 to $100; single rooms, 
with two or three windows, $300; suite with eight win- 
dows, $1,000 to $5,000." These prices will be paid for the 
privilege of seeing Grover Cleveland and William McKin- 
ley ride in the same carriage, and witnessing the longest 
parade ever known at an inauguration at the capital city. 
On the way to the Capitol the Ohio man will sit on the 
left, but, when the return trip is made, the New Yorker 
will take that seat. All this pageantry would look better 
if it were the spontaneous outcome of enthusiasm on the 
part of the people. Mark Hanna is engineering it all, and 
using the surplus "fat" fried out of the protected indus- 
tries. Evidently no money is to be spared to give McKin- 
ley a prodigious "send off." We think he will live long 
enough to regret it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 



Concerning The Lodge-Corliss Bill, which will shortly 
Immigration, come before the United States Senate, aims 
not so much at the exclusion of foreigners 
generally, but of those who are ignorant alike of their own 
language, of an occupation, and of the standards of living 
and character which distinguish the American people. 
This is a measure which will meet with the hearty ap- 
proval of every man interested in the welfare of this 
country, and its desirability will undoubtedly be recog- 
nized by those to whom it goes for ultimate recognition. 
The passage of this Bill will restrict, in a large measure. 
the immigration of that most undesirable and illiterate ele- 
ment, consisting of the Slav, Latin, and Asiatic races. To 
class along with these immigrants those coming from the 
United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Scandinavia, is 
as unjust as it is foolish. During the last fiscal year the 
average illiteracy of emigrants from Austria, Hungary, 
Italy, Poland, and Russia was 40.1 per cent, while of those 
coming from the other mentioned countries it was only 
3.7 per cent. Statistics also show that, while the former 
seldom become naturalized, the latter hasten to take out 
their papers and develop into good and patriotic citizens. 
By the census of 1890. of the Slav. Latin, and Asiatic 
foreign born in the United States, 32.0 percent, were 
aliens, while of the British, Ge-man, and Scandinavian 
only 9.9 per cent, were aliens. The immigration of this 
undesirable element has been steadily increasing during 
the last six years, and it is time a halt was called. Of 
pauper labor we have already more than enough. By 
permitting the ranks of the dissatisfied to swell, property 
and law-abiding citizens are endangered, and the welfare 
of the Republic is undermined. Of frugal, intelligent, and 
capable immigrants we cannot have too many. In time 
they become employers of labor themselves, and thus help 
to rid the human market of some of its excess stock. They 
soon recognize how much better off they are in this coun- 
try than under the Governments to which they formerly 
owed allegiance, ami they gradually become good Amer- 
icans in every sense of the word. The others, on the other 
hand, associate only with their fellows, and remain 
strangers to our ways and institutions. In their own 
countries they are of use merely as food for shot and shell. 
Seeing that we have no such use for them, we had better 
refuse them admittance within our peaceful gates. 

Our Part The Cuban question was beset with difficulties 
In Cuba, from the start. We had nc right to rob a 
country with which we had treaties of friend- 
ship, unity and commerce of the gem of her possessions. 
lie same time, we had selfish interests to promote in 
aiding whichever side could best govern Cuba. If the 
Spanish government could repress the rebellion, establish 
order, and put commerce on a satisfactory footing, well 
and good. We wanted no more. But it is plain to all ob- 
servers that that is something she has utterly failed to do. 
The last loan she raised for the purpose of quieting Cuba 
is nearly all gone, and almost nothing has been accomp- 
lished. Spain is practically exhausted, whilst the rebellion 
still flourishes. In this condition of affairs it may well be 
believed that there is unusual truth in the press dispatches 
which say that Spain is ready to accept the mediation of 
the United States, and to give Cuba independence in 
everything but name. But President Cleveland, it is to 
be feared, has undertaken a big contract when he promises 
to get the consent of the Cuban hotheads to a settlement 
that contains the substance of all that they have ever con- 
tended for. It may be that he has brought pressure to 
bear upon them in advance, and knows exactly what they 
will do. If so, he has prepared a diplomatic coup that 
will do him honor. The Senate does not like the bloodless 
victories that the President is winning. Its members 
want to do the whole business themselves, without possess- 
ing a single qualification for the doing of it. They desire 
to meddle in, and muddle the affairs of all creation. 
t. however, Cameron, Mills, and the rest of them are 
igniting fire-brands, the President bids fair to extin 
the whole conflagration. Cuba levying and Bpending 
own taxes, managing her own affairs, and dividing the 
offices around among her own people, ought to be one of 
the most happy and prosperous corners of God's earth, 
but will she be? About that there must remain grave 
doubt, until the trial is actually made. 



Our North Atlantic The efforts of our Government to ac- 
Squadron. quire a serviceable navy, which have 

been progressing for the last decade, 
are at last bearing some practical fruit. With the excep- 
tion of a few tire-eaters, we do not want war with Spain. 
Barring a few enthusiasts, we do not want Cuba. For 
nearly two years Spain has been so continually irritated 
by our jingoism that it is quite possible that the posses- 
sion of a respectable navy has saved our Atlantic seaboard 
from attack. However that may be, it is with a comfort- 
able feeling that Uncle Sam sits' on the rocky brow that 
overlooks his "sea-born Salamis," and counts his ships at 
break of day. He sees before him his North Atlantic 
Squadron, now grown to the proportions of a fleet. It in- 
cludes two battleships of the first class — the Massa- 
chusetts and Indiana — supposed to be unexcelled as fight- 
ing machines; two second-class battleships — the Maine 
and Texas— both possessing the confidence of the Navy 
Department, at least. Of powerful modern monitors, 
with the heaviest of armament, there are the Puritan, 
Miantonomoh, and Amphitrite. The armored cruisers 
New York, Brooklyn, and the swift Columbia complete 
the heavy ships of the line, while the supplemental fleet 
includes the cruisers Montgomery and Raleigh, the ' ram 
Katahdin, the dynamite vessel Vesuvius, and the torpedo 
boats Cushing and Ericsson, not to mention several 
cruisers which could quickly be called home from foreign 
waters. Weak as we are in torpedo boats, the above pre- 
sents a fleet powerful enough to guard our coasts against 
any power of the Spanish class, and to take the aggressive 
in the West Indies if the necessity arises. "He is thrice 
armed who hath his quarrel just," but it is pleasant to 
know that we have the means to sustain a just quarrel, if 
it should arise out of the present complications. 

The Propagation New York City has been exercised for 
Of Criminals many months over the trial and re- 
trial of Maria Barberi, for the murder 
of her lover, Dominico Cataldo, in April 1895. Society 
ladies have wasted tons of sentiment and hot house flowers 
on this accused woman. On the 10th of December the 
farce was completed by a verdict of acquittal, the defense 
being psychical epilepsy and consequent irresponsibility 
for crime. She may now, we presume, make continued 
crime her legalized profession. Not the least interesting 
development of the trial is the fact that the mother of the 
murderess went on the stand for the defense and testified 
that she had borne thirteen children including the play- 
ful Maria, and that every one of the baker's dozen was 
weak minded and epileptic. The question now arises: 
What will it cost the country to take care of Mother 
Barberi's brood of criminals and incompetents during the 
coming years, provided each one makes as good a record 
as Maria? Here is a practical test for Prof. Lombroso, 
and those who think with him that the naturally vicious 
should not be permitted to propagate criminals and idiots 
at the expense of the public, and transmit to posterity the 
increasing evils of their weaknesses. 

The Purification The Society of Friends lately held its 
of the Press. annual meeting in Baltimore, and has 
issued an appeal to the editors and 
journalists of the country, requesting them to give less 
prominence to crime and scandal in the columns at their 
disposal, and otherwise to labor in the interests of pure 
journalism. This appeal could well be heeded by many 
papers on the Pacific Coast, where journalism is, in many 
cases, the most degraded of the professions. More promi- 
nence should be given to virtue and good deeds, even if the 
illiterate and unwashed prefer sensationalism and scandal. 
It is apparently forgotten that there are respectable and 
God-fearing people in California, and that they must be 
supplied with the news. The average newspaper is run 
for the edification of the saloon keeper and his patrons, 
and other people must suffer accordingly. The so-called 
"Sunday paper " is of itself a desecration of the holy Sab- 
bath, and does more harm with its subtle impurity than 
all the yellow-covered novels ir. existence. It is refreshing 
to know that there is at least one daily paper in this city 
the columns of which are clean, and which does not take 
contamination into the home. This journal is the Call, and 
it would be good for this State if there were more like it. 



Januaiy 16, 1897. 



SAN FRANC1 



HON. GEORGE C. PERKINS. 

THE Republican Party has once more sent to the 
Uniti Senate George C Perkins,! 

of pronounced ability and 1 That he would be 

elected at Sacramento to succeed himself became ■ 
sured thing when Mr. Samuel Short 1 retire 

from the fight, and thus help along his opponent to victory. 
In connection with the tight so lately settled, and which 
was waged with all the ardor usual to political campaigns, 
great praise is due to the re-elected Senator for the clean 



mln(! ' nipt to toil 

ft 
w ashington. ha 

and our ]•• 

advertised. This Senator Perkil 

of doing, and ,f,ly leave the matter h 

hands. But there is another task for the 8 

perform, and a hard one. This task demands 

rib, and la nothing leu than counteracting the evil 




and dignified fight his managers, acting under his instruc- 
tions, made for him. It was a hard battle, and victory 
was honorably contended for on all sides. We feel sure 
that Mr. Perkins knew nothing about the disgusting 
methods indulged in by the abusive Examiner to prejudice 
popular opinion against Mr. Shortridge. No gentleman, 
or anyone with the first instincts of a gentleman, could 
condone that journalistic blackguardism, neither would he 
wish to defeat an adversary by such aid. Mr. Perkins 
himself comes out of the fight with clean hands, but it has 
been made painfully apparent that we have in California, 
for a leading Democratic journal, a foul-tongued and evil- 



influence of Mr. Hearst's San Francisco newspaper — the 
Examiner. The organ of demagogues and desperadoes, 
its columns open to the harlot and the quack, its till as 
hungry for the nickel of the beggar as it is for the dollars 
wrenched from the wealthy, the paper is an eyesore to the 
community and a disgrace and a danger to the State. It 
remains for Senator Perkins to continue the good work 
commenced by Grove L. Johnson, and place Mr. Hearst in 
his proper relation to California. When this position is 
adequately explained, Easterners will be willing to invest 
their money here. There is great work ahead for the 
Senator, and we trust he will not shirk it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 




• We obey no wand but pleasure's." — Tom Moor*. 



I ''INHERE is danger for the public lurking 
1 in these long, dull, theatrical weeks. 
It is at such times the critic's fancy lightly 
turns to thoughts of play-making. Not 
that I am menacing dramatic literature 
with anything of my own, having, as yet, 
too much disesteem for my enemies. Besides, I should 
dislike my young, hopeful life tinged by the bitterness of 
inglorious authorship, or handicapped by the misfortune 
of premature success. 

But there are other busy pens who have no such nice 
ideas about maintaining the balance of the critical tem- 
perament. Mr. Frawley told me there were but two 
critics in the whole town who had not offered him from one 
to three plays for production by his company. I don't 
know who the other fellow is, but I'd like to know — we 
seem to be disengaged on the same fishing days. 

Of course, this practice of writing plays is not confined 
to critics alone. There are others. After Greer Harri- 
son's experience with Runnymede, the laic dramatist 
dramatized unseen for a space. Then Leo Cooper's students 
in the actorial art cautiously began giving performances 
of one and two-act "original plays," and the fever burned 
again. Every third person I met was either writing a 
play or had one finished, and wanted an opinion (favorable, 
you may be sure) until I wondered where I could find a 
plain, pleasure-seeking theatre-goer, who had not turned 
his recreation into a trade. 

In justice to Mr. Cooper, I must confess that I have 
never been present at one of his students' matinees, and I 
am willing to take his word for it that the comedies, farces, 
and tragedies he and his disciples present are valuable 
additions to the drama; but, in the gentleness of my 
nature, I have been induced to read many manuscript 
plays, and each time it has been to either lose a friend or j 
make an enemy. 

I orened my heart to Mr. Bouvier the other night I 
asked bim if he had ever struck upon a successful wav of 
staving off the embryo dramatist. 

" Easiest thing in the world," said Bouvier, falling into 
a now-watch-me pose. " Now, say you're 1he man with 
a play, and I'm myself, the manager. You walk up 
briskly, manner courteous, smile bland, and all that sort 
of thing. 

You say: 'Mr. Bouvier, I believe.' 

I nod. 

"' My friend Mr. Friedlander,' you continue, 'advised 
me to call on you. I have a play, The Homtbrtaker; it's in 
five acts. Mr. Friedlander says it's almost too ambitious 
for his theatre, and he recommends my reading it to you. 
There's one thing I can tell you right now — it's absolutely 
original and 

"Here I stop you with a gentle gesture. ' My dear 
sir,' I say, ' while I may to you appear selfish and un- 
reasonable, and unappreciative of the honor you do me. I 
cannot read your play. I myself have recently finished a 
play, a society drama I should say, in four acts", TV Wife- 
(tapper, and all the little influence I may have must be ex- 
erted to my own advantage. I appreciate the compliment 
from you, and I am grateful for Mr. Friedlander's kind- 
ness, but the theatrical business isn't what it used to be, 
and, to tell you the truth, I don't know where I'll land if 
this play of mine doesn't go on and pull me out of the 
hole.' 

"Say? Why. what can he say ? He walks away, won- 
dering what the stage is coming to when base, commer- 
cial influence is pitted against real brains and literature. 
And," finishes Mr. Bouvier, balancing easily on his heels, 
" there you are." 

» * # 

If I had Joe Murphy's youth, I would go somewhere and 
grow up with the country. And I would certainly take 
with me 

a handful of earlh 

From tbe land of my birth 



which has been such good-paying, gilt-edged real estate 
for Joseph. That and the horseshoes have made him mil- 
lions; he can afford to be sick if he wants to, and to have 
a private press-agent bard of his own to sing the song of 
Murphy. And in view of this, there is something genuine 
and generous in the fact of his being on the stage at all, 
and I believe he only acts out of brotherly love and patriot- 
ism — just to keep the dear, old, boggy isle green in the 
hearts of his countrymen. And they meet him a good half 
way with whole-armed, vivifying applause, as he bounds 
boyishly over the Columbia stage in the pink and mettle 
of his sixty sunny summers. Who can criticise him ? and 
who wants to ? and who would read the criticism if any one 
could be found to write it ? Joseph Murphy is to be re- 
garded as a dilettante, not a professional, and by the time 
I am sixty and he a hundred and twenty, he will have 
smoothed out the A' /■/•)/ Goto and S/i<iit>i Rhve to suit the 
generation. Meantime, here's to Joseph Murphy — and 
when he's ill a-bed, here's to brother John, who, to be 
punctual, has ten years the start of him. 

Johnnie, me old friend Juhn ! 

Johnnie, tue old friend John ! 

There never were two such actors as Joe 

And 

nie 
John 

me 

old 

friend 

John! 
* # # 

Nine Hungarian rhapsodists, who style themselves The 
Royal Hungarian Court Orchestra, and a Swedish ventril- 
oquist with an almost unlimited repertory of dexterously 
handled figures, and who is named on the programme 
Lieut. Noble, are the reinforcements at the Orpheum. 
The Hungarian band is composed of soloists, and, while 
their ensemble is free, dashing, and impetuous, after the 
manner of Hungarians, I daresay the Orpheumites will 
shower most of their enthusiasm upon the solos. Collec- 
tively, the visitors will have a hard time displacing the 
popularity of Rosner's little hybrid band; but if the virtu- 
osity of the other eight is to be estimated by 
that of their leader, Matus — whom I heard play the clar- 
ionet Monday night with surpassing fluency and delightful 
tonal integrity, and several other degrees of long-haired, 
adjectivious excellence whi"h are not exactly in order for 
an Orpheum notice — you will miss some animate music by 
staying away. 

» # * 

Nordica. glorified by the recent success of Beyreutb, is now at her 
best— that is. the be9t this generation will know. No other Amer- 
ican singer has ever achieved anything like the glories that illumine 
her progress to world-wide fame. And even of the singers foreign 
born and foreign traineil. none has shown gifts and attainments such 
a* hers. Pen can only hope to celebrate her talents and graces; for 
analysis is well nigh futile, and criticism almost impertinent. 

I did not write the foregoing myself, much as I worship 
at this American songstress's shrine and much as I sym- 
pathize with the futility of analysis acd the impertinence 
of criticism. It is a stanza from the advance courier's 
authoritative pen, and it foretells the coming of Nordica 
and her comrades to the Baldwin Tuesday night, where 
you, and I, and all pretenders to art and fashion will re- 
ceive her as befits a queen of song. Dear old Scalchi is of 
the party, with lots of rich 'celloness, I understand, left in 
her great, wide, warm voice. Barron Berthald, tenor, 
and John C. Dempsey, basso cantate, complete the quar- 
tette, which, augmented by Luckstone, the pianist, and 
an orchestra, will sing in the three concerts, 
announced for Tuesday and Thursday nights, and Saturday 
afternoon. The first part of each programme is given up 
to miscellaneous songs, arias, and concerted numbers, to 
He concluded with an act, or scene, from opera. Faust, 
Tuesday; Troejtore, Thursday; and Siegfried ~&X the Satur- 
day matinee. 

* * * 

Altogether a hopeful-lookinsr week is looming up, with 
the additional prospect of some real plays and famous act- 
ing when a week lator Modjeska opens her season. 

The Columbia's bid for putronage is Charles H. Yale's 
time-d.l'ier. 77„ DrviVs Audi,,,,, in which are promised the 
acme of scenic splendor, a lively bicycle satire, a seductive 



January 16, 1897. 



SAN FRANC n.; R 



ballet, bevies of beautiful x\r\>. regiment* of trained 
comedians, aerial artists on the skylight ladder, dialect 
specialists, quips and songs beyond number, and a sou- 
brette whose banjo playing is unequalled. 

Besides a new sailor's frolic by the ballet, the Orpheum 
announces three new attraction:. : Hinns A Iiinns (im- 
mensely clever musical burlesquers. who were here a sea- 
son or two ago), the Frantz family of acrobats, and V. 
and Waring, comedians. 

Jack nml the Beanstalk will run another week, and then 
be shelved among the available assets of the Tivoli. 

A communication from undaunted Mr. Greenbaum asks 
me to state that the San Francisco Symphony Socieiv has 
been brilliantly organized with a guarantee fund of several 
thousand dollars. Mr. Phil Lilienthal has been elected 
treasurer; Mr. Hinrichs will be conductor, and Mr. Beel 
concert-master; and the orchestra will number fifty-five 
instruments. All that is needed is an appreciative public 
to swell the subscription lists — which are wide open at the 
music stores — so to the concerts, and look cultured. The 
season will be given at the Columbia on alternate Thurs- 
day afternoons, beginning February 4th. 

Hugo Hero'.d, the son of San Francisco's musical Patri- 
arch, will give a song recital at Golden Gate Hall on the 
evening of the 2!Uh inst. 

That's all. Ashton Stevens. 

THE DANCE OF THE DEAD -™>» the cerhah of 001 the. 

THE sexton looked forth at the mid hour of night, 
O'er the tombs where the dead were reclining; 
The moon, at its full, gave a great, ghostly light. 

And the churchyard as day was shining. 
First one, then another — ob, terrible sight! — 
Each grave opened wide, and, in gowns long and white, 
The dead all arose from their sleeping, 
Round the tombs grimly dancing and leaping. 

In a skeleton ring, then, together they bung, 
White they danced as the waves of the ocean — 

The poor and the rich, the old and the young — 
But their grave-clothes hindered their motion ; 

And, as here no modesty held its broad sway, 

They all shook them off, and around them there lay 
Their winding sheets, here and there scattered, 
And they naked— but that little mattered. 

In a frenzy of joy then they swung their long shanks. 

Their long fingers in unison snapping, 
And they clicked and clacked as they played their wild pranks, 

As though timber on timber were clapping. 
Then the sexton laughed loudly again and again, 
And mischief gave slyly the thought to his brain; 
" Now quickly— 'tis joking, not thieving— 

Steal a winding sheet! None are perceiving." 

It was done; and then swiftly he fled in affright 

Behind the great door of the tower, 
While the dance still continued, the moonbeams bright 

O'er the weird scene still holding their power. 
At last it was o'er, and the skeleton crowd, 
One after another, each slipped, on its shroud, 

Then into their cold grave* they glided. 

And silence once more presided. 

Butone— 'tis the last — trips and stumbles along, 

And eager each tombstone it scratches; 
But none of its comrades have done it this wrong, 

For the scent in the air now it catches. 
The church gate it rattled, but backward was pressed; 
To the joy of the sexton, the door had been blessed — 

With crosses of iron 'twas covered, 

And angels' wings over it hovered. 

Its shroud it must have, else it rests not again, 

For soon its last hour will be chiming; 
The columns it grasps the high tow'r to attain 

From summit to summit still climbing. 
Oh, sad for the sexton, for swifter it glides, 
And onward it rushes in wonderful strides I 

mischief! 'tis thou hast undone him; 

Heaven held him I 'tis almost upon bim. 

The sexton grew pale, in his horror he shook, 

And the shroud would have yielded with gladness! 
Near, nearer it came, then its last leap it took 

In a frenzy of rage and of madness. 
For an instant the moon no longer shone; 
"One!" thundered the clock in a terrible tone; 

Its limbs through the air wildly dashing, 

Down— down— fell the skeleton, crashing I 






' t IAPJ TOS 

EDITORIAL 

DEPARTMENTS 

1 >: f minroi importance u the 
•*Edltor*s Study" 

to which 

CHARLES DUDLEY 
WARNER 

treat* with irrar<-ful ra*r but with 
Mrloui intention the walleit »• 
1 -<n temporary literature and 
society. 

The 
" Editor's Drawer " 
under the manapenunt of 
JOHN KENDRICK BANGS 
wnl during i-i»T Misiatn tbe reputa- 
tion of this department of humor. 
which hits mi\<1e It a household word 
among the readers of two genera- 

85 cents acopy H a year 

HARPER & BROS. Publisher: 

New Yokk, 



Baldwin Theatre- AL HAYMAN * Co - "KSSSSSS! 

Three concerts only Tuesday evening. Jan. loth, third act of 
FAUST; Thursday evening. .Ian. 21st, last act of 1L TROVA- 
TORE; Matinee, Saturday. Jan 23d, last act of SIEGFRIED. 

MME. LILLIAN NORDIGA, 

Under the direotion of Al Hay man and Klaw & Erlanger, and 
assisted by Mme SotiaScalchl, contralto; Mr. Barron Berthald, 
tenor; Mr. J O Dempsey, naritone; Mr. I. Luckstone, pianist. 
Grand orchestra. Prices. J3, $2 50. $2, 81. 
Monday. January 25th; MODJESKA in " Magda," etc. 

G«J.. M k!- Tk^i-« The "Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 
OlUmUlcJ I neat.re- Frledlander.Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers 
Commencing Monday evening, January 18th. Charles H, Yale's 

"FOREVER DEVIL'S AUCTION." 

Truly a great performance. A dazzling wealth of resplendent 
magnificence The acme of spectacle; the perfection of elabo- 
rate display. Every evening, including Sunday. Matinee Sat- 
urday only. 
February 1st: "The Prodigal Father." 

T\ . I • r\ i—i Mrs. Ernestine Krkling, 

WO\\ Upera llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Next week, the SECOND EDITION of 

clflGK AND THE BEANSTALK. 

The King, the Queen, Jack, the Cow, the Giant„the Fairies, the 
Goddesses, the Mortals. 

New songs 1 New dances ! New skits ! Seats now on sale. 
Next opera— THE "WONDERFUL LAMP. 
Popular Prices 25c and SOe 

San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 
6Um • street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 
Week commencing Monday. January 18th. Many important 
changes. Direct from their Australian triumphs, the celebrated 

FRANTZ FAMILY, 

the world's greatest acrobats; Binns &Binns, the two noblemen, 

Wilson & Waring the tramp and the dancing girl, Lieutenant 

Noble, Sweden's greatest ventriloquist, the Royal Hungarian 

Court Orchestra, under the direction of P. K Matus, and a 

great vaudeville company. 

Reserved seats. 25c ; balcony, 10c. ; opera chairs and box seats, 

60c. 

Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Matinee Prices : Parquet, any seat, 25c. ; balcony, any seat, 10c. ; 

children, 10c, any part. 



Orph 



THE 111 



THE 



California Hotel 1 Hotel Rafael 




Absolutely Fireproof. 

San Francisco . . . 




j Open all the year. Only 50 
j minutes from San Francisco. I 



Gal. 



San Rafael 



Gal. 




Two modern, exquisite, home-like first-class hotels, 
both under personal supervision of t^en. Warfleld. 



R. ft. WflRFIELD & 



sxamsiasKSKnaraEsamerascxi 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



January 16, 1897. 




mMSxf. 



NEW YORK swelldom is now gossiping about that din- 
ner at Sherry's and the modest young lady who burst 
into tears when asked to dance in the "altogether." Yet 
there was a bachelor dinner party given in this city some 
time ago, where there was no squeamishness, but where 
the attempt at art was made the apology for the naked- 
ness of the surroundings. A certain wealthy young gen- 
tleman was going to Europe, and determined, like Lord 
Bateman, before he went abroad strange countries for to 
see, to give his friends a farewell dinner which should teach 
them not to forget him. He applied to a friend of his who 
was presumed to be a man of invention and originality, to 
devise this banquet. 

" I want something startling," he said; "something out 
of the common. • I don't mean as far as the eating and 
drinking goes, because all novelty in that line is exhausted. 
But something startling, old fellow, and never mind the 
expense. I'll foot the bills and consider myself your debtor 
for life." 

So the mentor set his wits a-working to please this young 
Telemachus, and announced one day that the plan was 
ready, and pocketed a check of three figures to arrange 
with the talent. The dinner was an exquisite affair, given 
at a place where all tl.at sort of thing is done up to the 
handle. When the desert was set upon the table, the 
lights were lowered, and a strain of weird, Oriental music 
was played by a few musicians, invisible to the guests. 
Presently the portieres at one end of the dining room were 
softly withdrawn, and a young girl, attired in the costume 
of a Roman cup-bearer, entered, stepping slowly, and 
swinging a censer filled with burning herbs of pungent but 
most agreeable perfume. She chanted a sort of hymn as 
she moved, and incensed each guest, and after making the 
circuit of the room, retired, while the revelers applauded 
loudly. Now the music became more animated, and again 
the portieres were withdrawn, and again the lovely censer- 
bearer appeared, this time leading a procession composed 
of six very handsome young women, who bore a huge shell, 
or imitation of a sea shell, upon their gleaming shoulders, 
and who represented the nymphs of Venus Aphrodite, 
carrying the Queen of Beauty to the banquet. Three 
were dark, and three blonde, and wore sea-green gauzy 
robes, while their feet were perfectly bare. The guests 
arose and made way for them, while they nlaced the shell 
in the center of the table, and then danced about it chant- 
ing a song in praise of love in excellent time and rythm. 
When the song was concluded, they took from a basket 
carried by a plump, tiny Cupid, wreathes of flowers, with 
which they crowned the guests. All the literary part had 
been written by the mentor for the feast, and" contained 
appropriate sentiments. Then at a signal from the host, 
the lid of the shell was opened, and Venus herself, the most 
beautiful of all, slowly arose from her casing, and the pic- 
ture was so intensely picturesque, and so artistic, that 
the utter lack of the garments of conventionality was for- 
gotten, and the enthusiasm of the guests was unbounded. 
Venus sang an adieu to the host, and with her nymphs 
pledged him in wine from goblets made after the pattern 
of the antique, while Cupid, holding her doves, crouched at 
her side. What might otherwise be deemed a rather 
risqtu spectacle, because of its artistic presenting, had not 
a single element of coarseness. But it would not do to 
give a censorious and mock modest world too close an in- 
sight into the doings of the epicureans. 
* « # 

Mr. James M. Hamilton went to a private masquerade 
a few days ago attired as Mephistopheles, a character 
which he is pleased to assume upon those festive occasions. 
All through that revel did Mr. Hamilton, "the Actors' 
Friend," behave himself most agreeably as the devil, and 
the reproachful rattle of the milk-cart was heard on the 
stony street when he emerged from his hack and rang the 
bell of the family mansion on California street. The pious 
domestic who attends to one part of the mtnage was com- 
pleting a long letter to a brother in Ireland, while the 
crimson figure on the steps was alternately wrestling with 



the latch key and the door bell. She looked out of the 
window, and the spectacle of the great enemy of man- 
kind boldly claiming admission (for Nora knew nothing of 
the masquerade) completely paralyzed the good creature. 
" Mother of Mercy, intercede for me!" she screamed, as 
she emptied a can of holy water on the gay masquerader 
beneath, and put her hands to her ears to shut out the 
hissing sound she felt must follow. Well, Mr. Hamilton 
finally got in. But the next time he goes to a masquerade 
he will afford Nora a private rehearsal before he departs. 
* * * 

This seems to be a winter of club discontent. The Cos- 
mos is in a sad muddle, and the Pacific-Union differences 
are far from reconciliation. The oldsters do not want to 
give up their snug quarters on Union Square for a gaudy 
palace on Van Ness avenue. They like to slip away to 
lunch, and a quiet rubber afterwards, and still be within 
five or eight minutes' run of business headquarters. The 
youngsters want a place where they can entertain their 
sisters, cousins, sweethearts, wives, and aunts, and witch 
them with their noble trenchership. The ladies are all 
on the side of the young men. And why not 1 Their 
supremacy means a letting down of the bars that separate 
club life from womankind, a season of game dinners, and 
an annex where they can exchange views after the fatigues 
of shopping. Now, the matter has virtually taken this 
shape : The oldsters will dissolve and build a clubhouse for 
themselves, and restrict the membership to a couple of 
hundred or less. The Bohemian Club must profit largely 
by the split, because many Pacific Union men are also 
members of the Bohemian, and the quarters of the latter, 
on Post street and Grant avenue, being so accessible, they 
will make it their habitat and spend their shekels there. 

* * * 

As the son of a clergyman, Horace Piatt is to be re- 
garded as an authority upon things heavenly. The witty 
lawyer tells a story of his encounter with a dirty-faced 
urchin, whose countenance was in marked contrast to his 
beautiful raiment. The boy was arrayed in Fauntleroy 
style and his modish costume was unexceptional. His 
most objectionable feature was his coarse red hair which 
fell over the shoulders of his velvet coat in its long un- 
curled length, looking for all the world like the tail of a 
chestnut horse. His appearance was astriking commen- 
tary on misplaced parental admiration, and the tout 
en»t mile jarred on the esthetic nature of the president of 
the Art Association. Piatt felt particularly disagreeable 
that day and the smile which usually divides his cheeks 
was absent. He stopped the ooy to deliver himself of some 
surplus irritation. 

"See here," he said severely, "why don't you get your 
hair cut?" 

"Oh," calmly replied the ingenuous youth, aged seven, 
"Mamma wants me to look like one of them damned 
cherubims." 

* # # 

La vie est mine; 

" Our Jim," secure, 
Talks fight again, 

I'l puis — bonjour. 
La vie est hreve. 

Says Fitz: " I bar 
This windy knave, 

lit putf — bon soir. 

* * # 

Frank Unger sailed for Honolulu last week with Edgar 
Crimmins, of New York, to make straight the paths in the 
summer isles for Harry Gillig, Donald deV. Graham, and 
Aleck Hamilton, who depart to-day for the same sultry 
clime. Therefore shall there be a gap in Bohemia until 
the return of the wanderers. Mr. Graham will give three 
concerts in Honolulu, assisted by Mr. and Mrs. Marquardt, 
Miss Alice Turner, soprano, and Mr. Gillig will also sing 
on those occasions. Mr. Graham will resume his lessons 
after February 14th. It is not necessary to say that the 
visit of those Bohemians will make glad the loyalists who 
mourn the pomp and circumstance of the fallen court, as 
well as those of the stern republicans who, under Oliver 
Cromwell Dole, are sharing the blessings of equality. Not 
that President Dole is a Puritan. By no means. He can 
play the cavalier as well as any roisterer that ever wore 
love locks. 



January 16, 1897. 



SAN* FRANCISCO NI-WS I. Hi 








-****■?• 



juiljrc from the en- 
thusiasm man 
by numbers of prettv women at the football panv 
Saturday, King, of the Army, kieked himself into high 
favor. One prettv girl, whose bright sallies always make 
her a sought-for social figure, remarked that he was "as 
good at football as in dancing the cotillion." There was 
a very fashionable crowd present at the game, and feeling 
ran high for the University chaps on one hand, and the 
boys in blue on the other, but the soldiers carried the day. 
thanks to King's superb playing; in fact, as a plunger, he 
was a brilliant success. The girls risked red noses and 
braved the icy wind in their eagerness to watch his move- 
ments. TpViltsee's tall form towered above the crowd, as 
he chatted here and there with the different belles. Harry 
Tevis was accompanied by his ],nt,r and brother Hugh. 
The widower Lieutenant of the army was in great demand; 
all his favorite girls were there, but, as usual, the stylish 
blonde had the innings. Duperu was devotion itself to 
the stately brunette, though rumor says a soon to be 
young matron is trying her best to win him for her sister. 
Winnie Jones looked blue about the gills, poor old chap, 
and General Barnes vied with any man present in attrac- 
tive appearance. The Hoffman sisters had a bevy of ad- 
mirers around them. Mrs. O'Neil Reis and Miss Brooks 
were warmly greeted by their friends, who so seldom see 
them in town nowadays. Miss Younger was strongly 
on the side of the 'Varsity boys, as was Miss Ida Gibbons. 
Greer Harrison was so excited he asked a friend if a ball 
game would not be a good thing to introduce into his new 

play. 

* * * 

It must be frankly admitted that the "house party," so 
striking a feature of British life, is not, as yet, as satis- 
factory an affair with our Anglophobian settlements of 
B'lingham and San Mateo. While the friends who assem- 
bled at the different homes in that would-be aristocratic 
vicinity no doubt had a pleasant enough time in a way, 
yet it is as house parties they were dismally a failure, de- 
pending entirely upon the club house gatherings for the 
festivities, no one house crowd being sufficient in itself to 
provide recreation without aid from its neighbors. As 
a bright young woman observed, "it is the same faces 

everywhere." 

* * # 

One of the most enjoyable affairs yet held at the Hotel 
Rafael was the festive Twelfth Night gathering, when the 
guests at that delightful hostelrie indulged in the old-time 
games peculiar to that holiday. Much merriment was 
caused by the horoscope drawn for several of the men 
present, and the refreshments served at the wind-up were 
worthy of mine host Warfield, who is noted for his effi- 
ciency in that line. 

* * * 

In the way of future gayeties, 'tis said a leading mem- 
ber of our beau monde is going to introduce the latest 
Gotham fad, of having her grown-up guests come to a 
party attired as children — short frocks, pinafores, and 
knickerbockers. As most of the fashionable folk of the 
day indulge in childish ways, no doubt the idea will be ex- 
ceptionally successful in the harmony of the whole. 

* » * 

The return to the swim of Miss Julia Crocker was a 
feature of the last Friday night cotillion. Miss Crocker 
was warmly welcomed, and was the recipient of many con- 
gratulations upon her recently announced engagement to 

Sam Buckbee. 

* * * 

On dit the guests at the Hotel Richelieu are meditating 
giving a dance some time before Lent, which is joyous 
news for those who indulge in fine suppers. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething ■ 



•Mrs. Winslow'8 Soothing Syrup " for your 



The King ot Pills is Beeoham's— BEECHAM'S 



Dcui. & Qeldermann'i 




a 



GOLD LACK 



M 



is. without doubt, the finest dry champagne imported 
from Prance. No connoisseur should fail to try it. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Sole Agonis. 314 Sacramento St . S. F 




Going out of 
Business. 

Commencing Monday, Jan. 4th 



125,000 



CLOAKS, 
SUITS, etc. 

The entire stock to be sold during next 30 
days at a TREMENDOUS SACRIFICE. 

ARI1AND CAILLEAU, 

Cor. Geary St. and Grant Ave. 



Egyptian enamel 

* The most perfect beautifler the world has ever known; it 

instantly transforms the sallowest complexion into one of 
peerless beauty, and imparts the natural freshness and 
bloom of youth; it defies detection, will not rub off, lasts all 
day, and is perfectly harmless. Endorsed by prominent 
physicians Price, 50 cents and $1 : large size sent prepaid 
to any part of the United States or Canada on receipt of 
price. Manufactured only by 

MPS. M. J. Dllul6r San Francisco, Cal.,' U.S. A. 



REMOVAL 



-MAGONDRAY & GO. 



Importers Teas, Mattings and Silks. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 

Agents North China Insurance Company (Limited), 

Have removed to 

116 California Street, San Francisco, Gal. 

J D. SULLIVAN, 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



Comet Oolong. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 




&C 



s*. 



A Book of A little book, but a good one. Lying land- 
the jobbers and ingloriously mendacious real es- 

Week.* tate dealers have so loudly and so persist- 
ently "boomed" Southern California, de- 
scribing it as an earthly paradise, free from every ill that 
flesh is heir to, that it is high time for a sober account, 
written by intelligent people for intelligent people. Such 
an account we have here. To the literary person it is, of 
course, matter of regret that only two of the eight chap- 
ters are by Beatrice Harraden, the remaining six, which 
deal with Southern California from the physician's point of 
view, being by her medical collaborator, who, though he 
flings about, as do all medicos, a good many terms, such 
as 'phthisis, tuberculosis, cirrhosis, etc.," yet writes sen- 
sibly and gives much useful information. He points out 
that there are many climates in Southern California, suit- 
able for many different ailments, and that the invalid must 
exercise much care and judgment in choosing the spot 
best suited to his particular disease, and the particular 
stage to which it has advanced. Having chosen his place 
of residence wisely, the invalid must then live wisely. It 
is foolish for people who cannot afford in Southern Califor- 
nia the comforts and attentions to which they have been 
accustomed in their own homes, to expect an immediate im- 
provement in their health. It is even probable that the 
fatigue of reaching the Pacific Slope, and the excitement 
of new surroundings, will at first cause the invalid to go 
back somewhat. A reasonable time, as the lawyers say, 
must be given before the climate can work any distinct 
benefit. And what is a reasonable time depends on the cir- 
cumstances of each case. The reader is reminded that 
Southern California is a pioneer country, and that domes- 
tic service is both dear and inefficient, as in all newly- 
opened lands. The invalid must place his greatest hope of 
benefit from the climate, in living an almost entirely out- 
door life, being careful, however, not to push outdoor ex- 
ercise to the verge of fatigue and exhaustion. In the first 
chapter the author of "Ships That Pass in the Night " 
writes enthusiastically of the beauties and charms of 
Southern California — of the free, unrestrained, open-air 
life, the riding and driving, the moonlight excursions, the 
botanizing expeditions, of the wealth and luxuriance of 
bright-hued flowers, and the dancing waters of the bright 
blue Pacific Ocean. In " Out-door Life for Women " Miss 
Harraden comments on the ease with which, when water 
is at hand, the desert can be made to blossom as a rose, 
and tells how a girl from one of the Eastern States started 
a strawberry ranch, and how another lady cultivated pam- 
pas grass, to the strengthening of their health and the 
lilling of their purses. The book will prove very useful to 
invalids who are contemplating taking up their residence 
in Southern California, and though it is at times somewhat 
technical and overladen with statistics of temperature, 
rainfall, and other matters, it furnishes the reader with 
many cold facts (such as, for example, that the maximum 
temperature recorded at Mammoth Tank on the Colorado 
Desert is 128 degrees Fahrenheit), and plenty of useful 
suggestions. The little volume is appropriately bound in 
a cover adorned with a design of cactus and palm. 

•" Two Health-Seekers in .Southern California." by William A. 
Edwards, M. P., and Beatrice Harraden. l'hila. J. B. Llppincott 
Company. 1897. Price, |1. 

Some time ago, the Chicago Record offered thirty thou- 
sand dollars in prizes for 'stories of mystery." Out of 
816 stories sent in for competition, "Sons and Fathers" 
won the bad pre-eminence of first place. The worthless- 
ness of contests of this kind for bringing out any real liter- 
ary talent is pretty conclusively shown by the stories that 
won the prizes in this competition. "Sons and Fathers" 
sterious enough in all coi full of dreams, 

visions, wild imaginings, and supernatural incidents, told 
in a banal, commonplace manner, boresome and tedious to 
the last degree. The talc is a mere tale, with no literary 
merit whatever. In fact, after struggling painfully, and 



with many smothered imprecations, through about half of 
it, we refused to budge an inch further, and, not caring in 
the least whose son the hero was, we left the mystery un- 
solved. The general character of the book may be gathered 
from the titles of a few of the chapters: "Back! Would 
You Murder Her 1 " 'The Tragedy in the Storm," "In 
the Crimson Mists of Sunset," "The Shadow Over the 
Hall," "The Rainbow in the Mist," "The Face of the 
Body-Snatcber. " We are irresistibly reminded of "The 
Poisoned Gum-Drop; or the Candyman's Revenge." 

"Sons and Fathers, " by Harry Siillwell Edwards. Published by 
Band, McNally & Co., Chicago and New York. 189G. 

The Roycroft Printing shop, of East Aurora, N. Y., has 
issued a well-printed brochure, entitled "Foreign Ideas in 
the Catholic Church in America," by the Rev. Father 
George Zurcher, Pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Buffalo, 
N. Y. From a perusal of its four chapters, we gather 
that the Catholics of this country are desirous to re-estab- 
lish the Pope as a temporal sovereign, and that the Ger- 
man Catholics in the United States are aggressive, over- 
' bearing, and exacting in their relations with their breth- 
ren of other nationaliiies. We further gather that the 
German Catholics are much in favor of the removal of re- 
strictions on the sale of lager beer at Church picnics, and 
are by no means bigoted advocates of water-drinking. 
These Teutonic churchmen, with the overbearing airs 
characteristic of the Kaiser's fellow-countrymen, say that 
"America is no nation, no race, no people": that "We 
have citizens of a Republic, but no nation, and no national 
language outside the languages which the races immigrated 
(xir) i speak in their families." Now, while it may be true 
that the United States is not a nation in the sense in which 
Great Britain or France is a nation, yet we certainly are 
of opinion that English is the national language of this 
country, and that attempts of knots of Poles, Hungarians, 
Dutchmen or Portuguese, to insist upon the use of these 
tongues by their American-born children should be sup- 
pressed. We may be, and doubtless are, prejudiced in 
favor of the English language, but we certainly think that 
any man may be proud to speak the language of Shakes- 
peare and Milton, and that, if he cannot say what he wants 
to say in it, he had better give up the effort to make him- 
self understood and relapse into silence. "Them's our 
sentiments." 

It gives one a strange feeling to see the title of a book 
by the late Walter Pater under the head of "Fiction;" 
but there it is. His "Gaston de Latour," a fragment of a 
romance, edited by his friend Shadwell, of Oriel College, 
Oxford, has just been issued by the Macmillan Co. Walter 
Pater's work has far too much distinction, and presup- 
poses in his readers far too high a degree of culture, for it 
to be possible that his writings should ever become 
"popular." But he is a beautiful and finished stylist, and 
his taste in language, philosophy, and art, beiug securely 
founded on the great masters, is unerring. Plato and 
Shakespeare were his teachers, and his theory of life was 
that a man should live in close touch with the men and 
women round him, and endeavor to reach perfection with 
regard to his own time and place. We sav that this was 
his theory, his practice, so far as we recollect it, perhaps 
scarcely conformed thereto: but this is to be set down 
to his fastidious and perhaps hyper-refined temperament. 

The Christmas or third issue of a new periodical, "The 
Sportman's Magazine," presents itself to us in a hand- 
somely illuminated cover. It deals with field sports of all 
kinds- Some of the articles in the December issue are 

Calling for Moose in New Brunswick," "After Big Fish 
at Santa Catalina," " Hunting Mountain Goat in the Cas- 
cades, and "General Custer as a sportsman." The maga- 
zine is on much the same lines as Outing. There is a reg- 
ular department entitled " Photography for Amateurs/' 
in which " the Professor " criticises pictures offered for 
competition, and particulars are given of liberal prizes 
offered for the best amateur photographs of subjects of 
particular classes. In "Current Topics" the Horse 
Show, the polo and football season, and other matters of 
interest to sportsmen are found. The subscription price 
is two dollars a year, one-third less than that of its older 
l 1V mi luting. This litt!e bit of arithmetic is commended 
to The Bookman, with our respects. 



January 16, 1897. 






16 four year-. Mr 

•<•(] to tl • 

■limit Prej :.!;,•. - tl)at 

handsome periodical he b 

characteristic manner with t! • .. ritteo 

for you in many places and in many moods, and I . 
hope to li. 1 I the mood of dullness. Bui a 

last the pen falls from my tirr<l tinpers. and I hav 
the strength to pick it m you farewt 

prejudice." IntheJanuai Mr. A. 

T. QiriUer-Cauc'n, who has recently published 1 pleasant 
volume, entitled "Adventures in Criticism," gives us the 
first of his cmutrirt, under the heading " From a Co 
Window." This issue also contains an article on "Cadet 
Life at West Point." by Lieutenant Hastings Brown, and 
one on Warwick Castle by Frances Evelyn Warwick, nf, 
Maynard. better known as the Countess of Warwick or 
Lady Brooke. From a perusal of as much of this article 
as we could read we infer that her ladyship, though a 
clever and fascinating woman, has not served any journal- 
istic apprenticeship. If we take away from the article 
the passages quoted from books, and the" titles of pictures 
transcribed from a catalogue, no editor would give two- 
and-a-half dollars for what some people, using a bastard 
English begotten by book-keeping out of ledger, call " the 
balance." 

The California State Mining Bureau has issued its thir- 
teenth Report of the State Mineralogist for the two years 
ending September 15, 181)6. Tt contains upwards of 700 
closely-printed pages, and is illustrated with many fine 
reproductions of photographic views of mines and mining 
machinery. The State is taken. CouDty by County, and 
full details are given of all the mines of any importance in 
operation. We are requested to mention the' fact that 
any citizen of the State may obtain a copy of this exhaust- 
ive report by sending his name and address (accompanied 
by the stamps for postage on the book) to the California 
State Mining Bureau, No. 24 Fourth street, San Francisco. 

THE poet has said: "There is no place like home," and 
to make a place worthy the name of home is one of 
the grandest achievements of men. We know of but one 
man who, by unceasing watchfulness, courtesy, and care, 
tact, talent, and indomitable energy, has succeeded in 
making an ideal home, not only for residents, but for 
weary travelers from all parts of the civilized world, and 
that man is Major William B. Hooper, manager of the Occi- 
dental Hotel of this city. 

That celebrated divine, John P. Newman, Bishop of 
California, one of its inmates, and who has been a guest in 
the largest and best hotels in every land, says: "The 
Occidental stands unrivaled not only for its epicurean 
table, but for those home comforts and enjoyments with 
which the Major makes all his guests feel that they have 
really found a home." 

The Overland Limited, 

OHLT Z\i DAYS TO CHICAGO. i% DAYS TO NEW YORK. 

The Union Pacific is the only line running vestibuled Pullman 
Double Drawing-room Sleepers and Dining Cars dailj'. San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago without change. Vestibuled buffet smoking and 
library cars between Ogden and Chicago. Upholstered Pullman 
Sleepers, San Francisco to Chicago, without change, daily. Steam- 
ship tickets on sale to and from alt points in Europe. For tickets 
and sleeping car reservations apply to D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



A trip to Leona Heights, the fashionable pleasure resort, should 
be undertaken by everyone who wishes to see the delightful spots in 
the immediate vicinity of Oakland and Alameda. Commodious cars 
run there from all parts of the just mentioned towns and fifty cents 
covers the round trip. On the grounds, will be found a first-class 
restaurant but no bar, which effectually keeps off the undesirable 
class of visitors. 



Upon one thing our legislators at Sacramento were all agreed. 
That was that no whiskey equals in purity and general excellence 
the famous J. F. Cutter brand of old Bourbon. Several cases have 
been forwarded to the Capital by E. Martin & Co., the agents for 
this Coast, from their office at 411 Market St. 

The Press Clipping Bureau, Bio Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Paoiflo Coast, and supplies clippings on all topios , business 
and personal. 



• perfect type of the highest order] 
of excellence in manufacture." J 

iWaitBrBaRer&Go:s* 

Breakfas t 

Locoa 



Absolutely Pure. 
Delicious. 
Jutritious. 

COSTS LESS THAN ONE CENT A CUP , 

Be sure that you get the 
genuine article, made at 

DORCHESTER, MASS., 

Sy WALTER BAKER & CO., Ltd. 
Established 1780. 



Army and Navy GluD 



Is the only 



.WHISKEY 



on the marltet, every package of which bears 
an affidavit guaranteeing it to be absolutely 
PURE and over SIX YEARS OLD. 



MbYERFELD, MITCHELL & CO, 

116 FRONT St., San Francisco, Cal. 

A Wonderful Medicine 

For Bilious and Nervous disorders, such as Wind and Pain in the Stom- 
ach. Sick Headache, Giddiness, Fullness and Swelling after meals, Dizzi- 
ness and Drowsiness. Cold Chills, Flushings of Heat, Loss of Appetite, 
Shortness of Breath, Costiveness, Blotches on the Skin. Disturbed Sleep, 
Frightful Dreams, and all Nervous and Trembling Sensations, etc, when 
these symptoms are caused by constipation, as most of thpm are. THE 
FIRST DOSE WILL GIVE RELIEF IN TWENTY MINUTES- 
This is no fiction. Every sufferer is earnestly Invited tc try one Box of 
these Pills and they will be acknowledged to be 

A WONDERFUL MEDICINE. 

BEECHAM'S PILLS, taken as direoted, will quickly restore Females to 
complete health. They promptly remove obstructions or irregularities of 
the system. For a 

Weak Stomach 

Impaired Digestion 

Disordered Liver 

they act like magic— a few doses will work wonders upon the Vital Organs ; 
strengthening the muscular system, restoring the long-lost complexion, 
bringing back the keen edge of appetite, and arousing with the Rosebud 
of Health the whole physical energy of the human frame. These are 
facts admitted by thousands, in all classes of society, and one of the best 
guarantees to the Nervous and Debilitated is that Beecham's Pills have 
the Largest Sale of any Patent Medicine in the World. 

WITHOUT A RIVAL. 

Annual Sales more than 6,000,000 Boxes. 

25c. at Drug Stores, or will be sent by U. S. Agents, B. F. ALLEN CO. 
365 Canal St., New York, post paid, upon reoeipt of price. Book free upon 
application. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




January 16, 1897. 



The sun does not shine to the content- 
Mining Stocks in ment of the Pine street operator. The 
Dull Request. aspect in and out of the Board rooms 
is still wintry enough to chill the most 
sanguine depositor among the speculative element. Dur- 
ing the week, a light advance at the south-end group sug- 
gested the hope that better times had dawned, but, as 
usual, hope was nipped in the bud. The rise in values 
gave the " bear " clique an opportunity to dump stock on 
the manipulators of the shares, and this soon stamped the 
life out of the game again. There is a hungry lot on the 
street just now, and the chance for a five cent deal causes 
a rush only equaled by that of a ravenous shark on its 
prey. There is no such thing as nursing the market into 
shape, with such a crew around, unless at the expenditure 
of a large sum of money, which would only be warranted 
on the part of manipulators by a really good ore develop- 
ment. Even then it would be a case of standing off the 
parasitic element at first, and working it gradually into a 
corner where it could be choked to death in time. There 
is a chance for an improvement of importance at the Gold 
Hill end, where a drive is being made for the west county 
in very promising ground. A find of ore there would 
change the complexion of affairs on the street and help out 
a number of deserving people now helplessly at the mercy 
of a piratical horde, equal to any little mean and contempt- 
ible trickery which the small, miserable soul can devise. 
The Con. -Cal. -Virginia, Crown Point, and Hale & Nor- 
cross assessments were delinquent this week. 

The Griffith Consolidated Mine, a prom- 
Another Gold ising piece of property on the Mother 
Mine Sold. Lode, located near Diamond Springs, El 
Dorado County, was bought by Mr. P. 
George Gow, of the Jumper Mine, during the week. The 
shaft of this property is only down, as yet, some 140 feet 
on a vein of fair grade ore from two to three feet wide, on 
which considerable drifting has been done. The improve- 
ments are small, but, as the ore reserves are large, it is 
the intention of Mr. Gow to duplicate the plant on a much 
larger scale. The price paid is in the neighborhood of 
$200,000. The bona fide intentions of the purchasers of this 
ground, and their previous investments in the Jumper and 
New Era Mines, of Tuolumne County, is evident from their 
selections being all young prospects. They are not look- 
ing for old shells with a reputation, useful for extracting 
money from the pockets of over-credulous investors in 
Great Britain. It is noteworthy that the schemers now 
foraging all over the State as purveyors for the London 
market, want something of the kind with a history, owned 
by people lax enough in principle to permit loading up 
prices with commissions to any point the rascally pro- 
moters may desire. These people have no use for the 
legitimate propositions favored by such investors as the 
Glasgow owners of the Jumper and Griffiths. 

While the press of Virginia City seems in 
The American earnest in its efforts to enthuse people 
Fiat Revival. there and elsewhere into taking up the 
project of re-opening the mines in and 
around American Flat, it will be hoped that they will suc- 
ceed in their purpose. The merits of the scheme "have been 
well aired now, and the next step should be organization 
to put the proposed plans into execution. Talk will not 
suffice to develop a heavy enterprise of this character. 
Money is the main desideratum, and plenty of it at that. 
There are many who believe that these mines are worth 
the venture, and it is very probable that with the right 
men at the head of the movement, all the financial aid re- 
quired would be forthcoming in short order. The San 
Francisco Stock Exchange has so far never even noticed 
the matter, but then this is in keeping with its vastly pro- 
gressive ideas, which are generally in a backward direc- 
tion. It seems a pity that the fate of the speculative 
business in this city should be held in such sinewless hands, 
which only grow tireless in opposing anything of a char- 
acter likely to benefit an institution in the final stages of 
decay. 



When it is understood that the big 
The Boom in California Powder Company is doing 

Powder Shares, more business in thirty days now than 
it used to do in six months, and only 
getting cost price for it, little argument is necessary to 
establish the proposition that, pooling the interests of all 
the companies on a basis of profits, no matter how small 
they may be, would be both sensible and prudent. That 
an attempt has been made to carry out some plan of this 
kind will be admitted, the negotiations being, however, of 
a rather one-sided character so far, with prospects of suc- 
cess dependent entirely upon concessions upon the part of 
the weaker concerns, which would practically knock them 
out of the manufacturing field, in particular on especially 
profitable lines. Does it not seem strange, therefore, 
with this knowledge of the exact situation, that the Giant 
stock has been the only one to boom at extravagant rates 
on the mere prospects of a combine? Here are shares of 
a company which owes enough now to put up a new pow- 
der manufacturing plant, which suddenly jump from $17 to 
$26.50 in a few weeks, upon the strength of a reported 
compact which does not affect prices of the stock in other 
companies, much more favorably situated financially, and 
yet there are people in the business who will tell you the 
advance is quite natural, nothing artificial about it at all. 
Of course not! Judging from the success which has at- 
tended for years past operations of the most brazen char- 
acter, to which cheerful reference could be made, a highly 
profitable field really exists in this town for some brainy in- 
dividual capable of work which could really be termed clever. 
The annual meeting of the San Fran- 
The Profits in cisco Breweries, Limited, was held in 

Local Brewing. London last month. The Directors paid 
no dividend, content with wiping out a 
lot of old debts aggregating between £13,000 and £14,000. 
The company made a profit last yearonasmall scale, with 
larger sales of beer, and flattering prospects are held out 
for the coming twelve months. The year of 1895 is re- 
ferred to in the report as one of unprecedented dullness in 
trade, and to the loss made then is accredited the absorp- 
tion of the profits this year. The company's trade has 
been growing steadily of late, and its affairs are now in a 
condition highly suggestive of future prosperity. 

A new fire insurance company, entitled 

New American the Inter-Commerce Insurance Company 

Fire Company, of the United States, is in course of for- 
mation in New York. It will have a 
capital of $200,000, and a surplus of an equal amount. The 
list of incorporators contains the names of a number of 
well-known men in financial circles. It is announced that 
farm property, dwellings, and long-term lists will not be 
written, but that liberal lines will be written on choice 
mercantile risks and manufacturing plants with standard 
sprinkler equipments. It is expected that the company 
will begin to write business about February 1st. 

H. H. Vereker left for the Lane mine 

Mining Gold on on the Coquille river, Oregon, on Wed- 

.the Coquille. nesday last. He will have charge of 
the engineering department in the work- 
ing of a new process which the gold mining company is 
hopeful will prove a success. The Lane mine was always 
rich, but the gold, being flaky, was lost in large quantities. 
It is proposed to work over the tailings on the new prin- 
ciples, by which it is proposed to catch the greasy gold 
from out of the black sand. Mr. Vereker is generally con- 
sidered well up in the duties of a mining engineer. 

The production of gold in California for 

Minions Flying the past year is estimated at $16,000,000. 
In the Air. If the statements appearing in print 

during the past six months could be 
credited, about $32,000,000of foreign gold has been dumped 
in this State, most of it coming out of the pockets of the 
Rothschild family. It is little wonder, then, that the ideas 
of mine owners have been inflated beyond reason by the 
publication of such ridiculous nonsense. As a matter of 
fact, money was never tighter in London than it is at 
present. 

CAPTAIN Thomas Mein (formerly manager of the Rob- 
inson Gold Mine. S. A. R.), has joined the Boards of 
the Alaska-Treadwell, the Alaska-Mexican, and the 
Alaska United Gold mining companies. 



January 16. 1897 



SAN 1KAN\ : 




\vs LETTER 



«3 



'Hear tbo Crier"' 'Whai if.c Jerll»rl thou!' 
'Onelhal wlllpliT ihedorll olr.wllo rou." 



T BE Town Crier lately received an invitation to be- 
come an honorary member of the holy order of 
Ancient Colonial Dames, a society composed mainlv of 
antique ladies having proofs Dositive that their an. 
did not perambulate the streets of their native hamlets 
with barrows or participate in the furtherance of the wel- 
fare of their fellow citizens by occasionally purifying their 
linen. The Town Cbxbb did not see his way clear to join 
the antiques, although he can prove the existence of his 
grandparents as clearly us the eldest of them. The men 
of his family, as well as the women, have never labored 
with their hands; as penmen or pickpockets they have 
ever preferred their lingers. The reason why the* Town- 
Crier refused to have his well-sounding and distinguished 
name emblazoned on the pay roll of the order of Ancient 
Colonial Dames is that he is a modest man of genteel 
breeding, and his experience has taught him that ladies who 
brag about the past refinement of their families are often 
ignorant themselves of the canons of modern good manners. 
In other words, the descendants of Colonial Dames are not 
necessarily ladies. 

IT is now as much as any woman's reputation is worth to 
go to Oakland, or take an afternoon trip to Alameda. 
Since election, the dailies have had to resort to desperate 
methods to hatch up sensations, and if a maid or matron 
happens to go a few blocks from home, or bow to a gentle- 
man on the street, her elopement is a foregone conclusion. 
The Town Crier is in mortal fear himself every time he 
raises his hat to a fair acquaintance. 

IT is devoutly to be hoped that the acquittal of Mrs. 
Hartley, slayer of Senator Foley, may not cause 
another epidemic of crime in this city, in which women will 
seek to avenge themselves for wrongs real or fancied by 
the reckless use of loaded pistols. As long as the in- 
furiated sex confines its operations to rolling pins and flat- 
irons, man is comparatively safe. 

THE batch of brides turned out this year 
From each paternal neat, 
Would indicate that papa dear 

Is going to have a rest. 
And that a younger man must hoard 
The cash to pay his daughter's board, 

ftT last the searchlight of investigation is being turned 
on the prosecuting attorneys and clerks who fatten 
in the Police Courts. Usually these gentlemen are politi- 
cal bummers, who would appear to advantage behind the 
bars themselves. Seeing that we cannot hang them, let 
us at least dispense with their services and keep them 
from fattening at the public crib. 

THAT was a curious blunder in the Examiner of Sunday 
last, by which David Dudley Field, eminent as a codi- 
fier of law, was represented as "the codfisher." The Call 
of the same day used the word "thorax"' instead of 
"larynx," throughout an article on the resuscitation of 
persons apparently drowned. Where are the proof- 
readers? 

ONE Lapizonda, a fourth-rate actor, has been arrested 
for grand larceny. Was it necessary to trump up 
such a long-delayed charge as that? Why not have run 
him in at the outset of his career on the far more serious 
offense of bad acting? 

SCARCE have we wished each other well in greeting, 
Scarce is toe glad New Year upon its way; 
When we are told that there will be a meeting 

Of women and their congresses in May. 
Oh, vanished hope of peace that was to be 1 
We thought that '97 would set us free ! 

BY all means let the City Hall be renovated and cleaned 
by responsible parties. In the meanwhile, every man 
emerging from its doors should be placed for a time in 
quarantine, so as not 1o pollute his fellows. 

IT is to be supposed that Colonel Dan Burns found another 
mine at Sacramento. 



Sat the <1. 
tnr<l:. 
their 
turbnnce has r. .. % th< 

Tbty . urr ru «ilh thnr horrid pill» 

Tl»- ■ *n1 mm. 

And ihrn prt xn l ihrir mon«trmn M)h 
ikf of «irk attain. 

SHARKEY denies that he is nbout to lie man 
This is not Strange The woman of to day who weds 
BO with the intention of doing all the subsequent 
j knoekingout that i- necessary. She is not apt ' 
such defeat at the outset ;i^ the bride of a Sharkey must 

contemplate. Pugilists are not the most desirable 

matrimonial prey. 

Til K very latest device for free advertising lias been 
introduced by Yaw, the steeple-noted vocalist, who 
circulated the report that she had died without even time 
in which to say her prayers. It worked to a charm. We 
may now expect to hear of the demise and subsequent re- 
surrection of every professional in the country. 

FROM the lively manner in which young women are at- 
tempting to die for love lately, it would seem that the 
teachings of the man-hating New Woman, which at one 
time threatened to uproot sentiment from the hearts of 
womenkind generally, have had no influence after all — at 
least not around these diggings. 

THE Town Crier suggests that Jake Rudolph be incar- 
cerated in a jail for life, and as he seems to have a fond- 
ness for using his fingers, he might put in his time making 
jute bags, or some such useful articles. For such a fellow 
to be allowed to roam the streets, is to endanger the life of 
every law-abiding citizen. 

JOHN THOMPSON, the man who has been arrested 
for stealing sugar from a grocer, need not be des- 
pondent. He should demand that the pilfered commodity 
be analyzed, bribe the chemist to swear that it is merely 
a mixture of cornstarch and sand, and the rest is com- 
paratively easy sailing. 

OH where is T. V. Cator gone. 
The Populislic Thunder Bird? 
Nay, can it be, so crushed is he 

That never more will he be heard* 
Or will he wait a few short years 
And melt our hearts again with tears ? 

DE. WILEY, the man who befriended a youth named 
, Julius Hirsch, saved him from starvation and other 
inconveniences and got robbed by him as a reward for his 
kindness, will probably conclude that the role of the 
Good Samaritan is all very well, but that it does not work 
with highly desirable results in San Francisco. 

HORNED rattle-snakes are said to be plentiful in 
Death Valley, but one does not need to go outside 
the city limits for snake lore. For variety, liveliness, 
abundance and brilliancy, the breeds vouched for by some 
of the Town Crier's bucolic acquaintances cannot be sur- 
passed. 
IT must have been extremely embarrassing for the land- 
lady whose boarder died at her table the other day. 
Results of the average boarding house regime are usually 
of a fatal character, but they are seldom so suddenly 
developed. 

HALF-A-DOZEN pages of Funding Bill matter in Tues- 
day's Examiner saved the public from an equal 
amount of fake news and morbid sensationalism. This 
was, indeed, something to be thankful for. 

TEN coroner's inqvests ard ten divorce suits in one day 
may not be much of a record in New York City, but 
for San Francisco it is a fair average, and shows that we 
are not as Silurian as some folks think. 

NOW that the "Octopus" has been downed, what will 
become of Uncle Sutro? Sooner than fade from out 
the public's notice, we fear he will start a railroad himself. 

WANTED: The photo of a bride who was not declared 
to be beautiful by the society reporter at the wed- 
ding. 

THE Exhumer rightly considers itself a fly paper. 
Even dollars stick to it. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 




DEAR EDITH:— The newest designs for evening gowns 
which have come from Paris in the past fortnight 
are extremely elegant and betray a slight reaction from 
the very ornate patterns which have been so much in 
vogue during the past months. In every instance the 
costume is made of the same material, both waist and 
skirt, and in most of these the two are separate garments. 
In one out of three the robe is a masterpiece of fitting, 
and flows in uninterrupted and graceful lines from the 
shoulder or the inferior line of the corsage to the floor. 
Each design is dicolletl. There is a slight variation in 
treatment, although the general type may be said to be 
cut rather low in the front and the middle of the front, 
and to run upward in a curved line to the shoulder or the 
edge of the shoulder, and thence downward in a graceful 
curve to the middle of the back. The variation depends 
upon the figure of the wearer. Where the shoulder is ugly 
or angular the shoulder strap and decoration conceal it. 
Where it is rounded or beautiful, the decoration passes on 
the outside. Where the upper arm is plump and hand- 
some, it is exposed from just above the elbow to a thin 
line of shell trimming in silk, ribbon, crepe or lace or a 
festoon of flowers at the edge of the shoulder. 

Bolero jackets are as much worn as ever, in spite of 
hopes, protests and prognostications against their again 
appearing in exclusive circles as good style. They are 
universally becoming, and are triumphant as a finish to 
the natty street costumes, for which they are particularly 
appropriate. Some of them are made of elegant brocades, 
which need no trimming except on the edge, and are 
slashed almost to the neck in the back, showing a hand- 
some, plain, rich effect in the waist underneath. For the 
young miss they are trimmed all around the edge with a 
fine knife-plaiting of chiffon about three inches in depth. 
while others have a fine silk or beaded fringe. One of the 
newest ideas in bolero jackets is to trim the shoulders 
with caps or frills to fall over the top of the sleeve in the 
waist beneath. 

A bridesmaid's dress seen recently was of pale green 
silk made with full skirt, relieved only by a twist of 
mums: lint • !, soie around the foot. The waist v.. 
round one of the same silk, entirely veiled with green 
telini detoie. This gave a very fairy like look to the 
dress. A long silken sash of green was wound around the 
waist and tied at the side with small loops and long ends. 
The throat, which was cut square, was finished with a 
twists of the same silk. The sleeve pulls were of green 
silk and were quite full. They were put on to look like 
small balloons or the mythical wings of a goddess. The 
floating ends of the sash, the sleeve puffs and the lightness 
of the moutselim- •/■ «ou gave this dres« a particularly 
airy appearance. 

Tucks are still used on skirts, bodices and sleeves in 
many ways, and these can be made with far more effect 
than the simple style of decoration might be deemed 
capable of. The tucks may run wide or narrow, or both 
in conjunction, they may be straight or diagonal, in short, 
tucking a garment, like shirring it in smallest silk stitches. 
can be made quite a fine art, and the fashion prevails this 
season among the heaviest as well as the most diaphanous 
textiles. Belinda, 

Through Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 
The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad (Santa Fe route) runs daily 
through from Oakland to Chicago first-class drawing room and 
second-class modern upholstered tourist sleeping cars. Lowest rates 
to all points in the t'nited States, Canada, Mexico, or Europe. 
Ticket office, IU4 Market street, opposite Chronicle Building. Tele- 
phone Main 1531. 

San Francisco is the best place in all the world whereto buy 
anti-|ue Japanese curios, ivories, bronzes, and tapestries. And in 
all San Francisco there is no place where such a fine variety is to be 
found, and at such reasonable prices as at Geo. T. Marsh' 
Market Street, under the Palace Hotel. 



Grand Annual 
Midwinter 
Clearance Sale 



Now in Progress. 



Everything at a 

Prodigious 

Sacrifice. 



See Daily Papers for Particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

FINE FURS 
and 

SEALSKIN 
GARHENTS 

lo order. Remodeling and 
repairing at prices far be- 
low those of any other fur- 
rier on me Pacific Coast. 
All work guaranteed. 

flD. K060UR, 

FASHIONABLE FURRIER, 
S l A Kearny Street (Up-stairs), 

Opposite Chronicle. Formerly cutter with Revlllon Freres, Paris, Lon- 
don. New York. 




Gray Bros., 



316 Montgomery Street, S. F. 

No. 205 New High St.. Los Angeles. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and 

Manufacturer of 



flrtitiGial Stone 



Schillinger"s Patent ] i n all its branches 

Side walk and Garden Walk a specialty." 

Office: 307 Montgomery street, (Nevada block) San Franclscc 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Fens, 



Gold Medals, Paris 1878-1889. These pens are "the best 
In the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
MR HENRY HOE. »\ John Street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



January 16. 1897. 



SAN FRANC 



"5 







u 



A DREAM.— <bui CUMKI -o« n»H«o>. 

PON a lime, so *weet. 90 tienr, ;i dream 

Cftnie flouting through the wntrhcs o( the night : 

With gcntleM Umcb, unlocked the gates of will, 
And all my striven-for pallet 1 a put to night. 

I'ntrammeled by Necessity's strong hold. 
For she had closed her tired eyes in sleep. 

Free as the air. forth in 1 

< 'f L-Iorious fancy my strong soul did leap. 

There, with glad feet, and heart all flattering fa-i . 

With sweet presentiment of bliss unsolved, 
I wandered, knee-deep, through the fragrant grass; 

While 'neath a cloudless sky the world revolved. 

And then, as naturally as shone the Sun, 

Cameone to meet roe, through the blossoming ways; 
Like two blithe, care-free children, there we strayed, 

And plucked from Ages' hoard the flower of days. 

And never, never while I live alone, 

Shall e'er depart the memory of that day; 

While, warm within my heart, the tonch of hand, 
Of whispered words, and clinging lips shall stay. 

And still, with tender arm about my life, 

The dear, sad angel of Renunciation stands, 

And says : " Have patience, soul ; thy garden fair 
Thou'It tind beyond the years in happier lands." 



DIVIDED.— FLORENCE A. JONES. 



God ! that hapless dead should vex our peace ! 

Why should she follow me with grave- bound feet, 
Haunting me with those dead eyes, stern and sweet; 
Standing with clasped hands, while I pray release? 

In the long, awful watches of the night 

1 hear her trailing garments on the stair; 
1 smell the one dead rose that decks her hair; 

1 know just where she stands, so still and white. 

1 feel a cold, dead band clasp close my own ; 

Poor little hand, that wears no wedding ring; 

Dear hand, that with love's wont gave everything; 
O, little hand, would God I could atone! 

O wife, whose dark head nestles on my heart, 
You, whom I honor as sin honors good. 
The perfect type of pure, cold womanhood, 

You do not dream how far we are apart 1 

Alas for him whose wisdom comes too late I 
I know that, after all, love's way is best, 
The love that giveth all, at Love's behest; 

O, bitter-sweet! 0, love insatiate! 



THE EMPTY HOUSE— Westminster sudoet. 

To think the moonlight shines to-night 
In the dismantled rooms that were 

Love's own, the moonlight, cold and white, 
Upon the desolate walls and bare ! 

To think the dawn shall rise and flood 

The empty house that was Love's own, 

Wherein Love's hours were warm and good, 
Wherein Love's heart hung heavy as stone! 

To think I shall come there no more 

To the familiar place, to know 
The stranger's foot shall cross the floor 

Of old where I was wont to go ! 

house that like a little ghost 

Calls to me through the night and rain, 

1 know not if I love you most 

For all the joy or all the pain: 

For hours in which my joy lay dead, 

For hours in which all heaven I knew— 

Only my life, when all is said, 

Leaves an immortal past with you ! 



Your t himney has as murh 
to *1'> with your Light as your 

lamp has. 

The Index tells what Num 
ber i" .;■ i : senl free. 

" Pear] top " <n- ■■ pearl 
5,'lass." 

Geo A Macbeth Co 

Pittsburgh Pa 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 



RESTAURANTS. 
Bergex's Restaurant, Academy Building, 3S3-3&4 Pine street Rooms for 

ladies and families, private entrance. John Borgez, Proprietor. 
Malion Tortoni, French Rottsserle, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor 
Nevada Restaurant, 417 Pine st. Private rooms; meals 50c. Loppy Bros 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E, cor. Grant ave. and Bush st Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 439. A. B Blanco &B Brun. 

DENTISTS. 

Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows' Building, southwest cor. Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours: 9 a. m. Io5p.h, Consultation Hours: 4to6. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter Btreet. 

MEDICAL. 

Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St., near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105O'Farrel) St.,S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

PRINTING AND RUBBER STAMPS. 
Koch & Harney, (Jas. H. Harney, Geo. T. Koch), Job Printers. 648 Sacra- 
mento St. Fine printing and embossing, seals, rubber stamps, stencils, etc. 

CANDIES. 
Latest English Pear Drops. Roberts 1 , Polk and Bush. 

VEHICLES 
8econd-band Victoria. O'Brien & Son's pat. Spring Buggy, Surrey and 
Top Buggy, for sale cheap. 500 Golden Gate avenue. 



INDIA OPIUfl CURE, 



Room I, Columbian Building, 
B. D Kimmis, Proprietor. 916 Market Street, S. F. 

OPIUM, MORPHINE and COCAINE 

And all other opiate habits cured speedily and effectively or money re- 
funded. Ladies treated privately at home. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS,, 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 

COKE—Cheapest Fuel! 

REDUCTION In Price. 
Wholesale (50 bbls. or more,) EIGHTY 
Cents per bbl. Retail (any quantity 
under 50 bbls.), NINETY Cents per 
bbl. At the works of the 

San Francisco Oasllght Co. 

Howard and First Streets. Foot of Second Street 



You Must Look Neat. 



Suits Cleaned 
and Pressed 



$1.00 



Bau Gitu Clothing Renovatoru, 

Suits called for and delivered. 



S3</, GoarySt., Easterbrook B'ld'g, 
Rooms 19-30-31. 'Phone Grant 158. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 




^i 



"Why not?' 
" — Pearson's 

"What was 



Piugwinch — Congratulate me, dear boy! I'm engaged to 
the wealthy Mrs. Gradster. Piosnikfle— So glad, old 
man! But — er — are you sure she is really so rich? 
Pluowinch — Sure? I should say so! Why, she was ar- 
rested for shoplifting and acquitted as a kleptomaniac. — 
Truth. 

"Pardon me," said the new boarder after the others had 
left the table, "but I'm not up in table etiquette and don't 
know just how oranges should be eaten." "Very sparing- 
ly, sir, very sparingly, at this time of year," answered the 
thrifty landlady. — Detroit Free Press. 

"Look at that foolish Mr. Baker out on a day like this 
without an unbrella. Is he crazy?" "I'm afraid he is. 
Let's hurry on. I don't want to meet him." 
"He may recognize this umbrella. It's his. 
Weekly. 

"Louise was furious about her wedding." 
the matter?" "The organist was a rejected lover and he 
played the bridal couple out of church with the tune, 
'He's got an Elephant on His Hands.'" — New York 
Herald. 

"Nearly 3 in the morning! This is a nice time for you to 
come home!" "You see it was this way, my dear. I was 
detained a little, so I put off coming home for a bit longer, 
so that I should not disturb you in your beauty sleep. 

He — There is one thing to be said about the Scotch 
dialect stories now floating about. She — And what is 
that? He — They may be the same old stories, but no one 
will recognize them. — Yonkers Statesmen. 

"So it was a happy marriage?" "Quite. The bride 
was happy, the bride's mother was blissful, the Count was 
in ecstasy, and I understand that his creditors are in a 
state of delirious joy."— Pearson's Weekly. 

"All I ask," said the man with the business glint in his. 
eye, "is that they will give me plenty of rope." Then it 
was that they recognized him as a manufacturer of cam- 
paign cigars. — Indianapolis Journal. 

She — You know, dear, we won't get any of father's 
money while he lives. He— I know, but he's going to re- 
side with us, and you're going to do the cooking. Let's 
hope for the best. — Philadelphia Times. 

"Why do you beg?" asked the kind hearted woman. "I 
can't help it, ma'am," said the beggar. "My wife's a 
widder with rive children, and they looks to me for 
support." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

"Bridget, I've discovered that you carry more food home 
with you than you cook for us." "Yes'm, but me fambly 
iz bigger'n youru."— Chicago Record. 

He— I'm working on a flying machine, dear. She— It's 
too bad you haven't got it with you. I hear papa coming 
downstairs. — Yonkers Statesman. 

"He's one of the kindest of men to animals." "Yes; I 
understand he shuts his eyes when he sees a Frankfurter." 
— Yonkers Statesman. 

The Nurse (smiling)— Well, "it" is twins. Wheeler 
(crushed)— Heavens! I hope bicycles will be cheaper next 
year. — Puck, 

Muggins— Is your son in business? Juooins— He's a 
contracter. Muggins— What line? Juggins— Debts — 
Tid-Bits. 

"Do you like colored servants?" "It depends on the 
color. I don't care for green ones." — Harper's Bazar. 



Are You Going East? 
The Atlantic and PaciBc Railroad, Santa Fe Route, ia the coolest 
and most comfortable summer line, owing to its elevation and ab- 
sence of alkali dust. Particularly adapted to the transportation of 
families or large parties, owing to its Pullman palace drawing room 
and modern upholstered tourist sleepers, which run daily through 
from Oakland to Chicago via Kansas City. Ticket office, 644 Market 
street, Chronicle building. Telephone Main 1531. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309 and 3)1 Sansome St. .... San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 48 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY SCO 29 South Caatle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 438 California St., S. F. 
Fibi Inborancb. 

Founded A. D. 179? 

Insurance Company ot North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PIHN. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,010 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 8,192.001 99 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,508,409 41 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 
B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1825 

Capital. 82,250,001.. Total Assets. 18,854,058 65 
UNITED STATE EPARTMENT: 204 Sansome St., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established nw. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated 1799 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 
418 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

C » pltol 16,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
No. 816 California St., 8. F 

DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS.-Buy none but the genu- 
rwhim- w..,.j,r Ine-Aspeclflo for Exhausted Vitality, Physical' 
Mdih/m^SS^ ^°fc?*; APProved by the Academy ot Medicine. Paris, 
and ihe medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Paoiflo States 
stnVH.T Jr.,, * co - ** Market street (Palaoe Hotel), San Franolaeo. 
se ot by mall or express anywhere. " ..«..»«,. 

13 5? ■ nfiV l nn D J I £ ED r Bor ol ""J"!'. •' *; of 100 pills, H; of 900 pills, 
as 50, of 400 pills, 18; Preparatory Pills. IS. Send for olroular. 



January 16. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•7 



A SPECIMEN OF CUBAN CORRESPONDENCE. 

Ofk Fli.hiha Kbys, January, ; 

ablt //. /.' Sf, Mahotuy to any poper 

that trill print it: Pf.ah Mr. EdiTOH. — Feeling it my duty 
as a representative of the urtat American people to use 
my God-triven talents in their service, I resolved to visit 
Cuba and probe tbe lamentable situation there to the 
bottom. I have done so. and from this moment the United 
States may lay aside her fears as a garment. 1 took two 
of my lives in my hand in facing both a Spanish and an In- 
surgent death. That is nothing. Providence has mirac- 
ulously preserved me to tell my story to a breathless 
world. 

I landed in Havana on the — th, and at once hunted up 
lodgings on a back street. Reporters of every tongue and 
clime followed me. importunate for interviews. I slipped 
into my apartments and locked the door, intending to re- 
main until morning. At dinner time the landlady informed 
me that there was nothing to cook. She said: "Things 
have been mighty scarce, Sefior, since they stopped grindin' 
cane." 

I remembered noticing, as I came along the street, that 
our house backed up against a yard in which there was a 
chicken coop. To steal out the back way, climb the fence, 
avoid the dog, and return with a fine fowl, was the work 
of only a couple of hours for me. The next morning I 
called on General Lee, who took me at once to the Cap- 
tain-General. We discovered General Weyler hard at 
work on a typewriter. He is a little man, not bigger 
than Uncle Ben Harrison, but fiercer. When he saw me, 
he clambered down from his stool, raised himself on tip- toe, 
threw his arms around my neck, and sobbed for joy. His 
true soldierly instincts had recognized me. 

"I am glad you came," said he, "I wish all the Amer- 
icans would come and see for themselves how things are 
here." 

"General," I replied solemnly, "I have come to learn the 
whole truth about this Cuban uprising. What report shall 
I make to my countrymen ? " 

He laid his thin forefinger along his Spanish nose, which 
first saw the light in Ohio, and, with a candid twinkle in 
his eye, he said: " Mahoney, there is nothing in it." 

Just then a bullet crashed through the window, plunked 
its way through his military chapeau, and passed out by 
way of the opposite wall. Without a tremor, the General 
turned to an aide: " Go, Captain," said he, " and tell those 
Cubans that, if they want to practice target shooting, 
they must go down into Pinar del Rio,' where it won't dis- 
turb me." 

He turned to me kindly, and asked. " Where were you 
last night, Mahoney ? Your strange disappearance for 
some hours has been cabled to every capital in Europe, 
and I am just writing an explanation of it for the Impar- 
cial, at Madrid." 

" I was out foraging — I mean reconnoitering the insur- 
gents," said I, ''in the interest of my search after the 
truth." 

" I am glad you did," he replied; " the fact that you are 
alive proves that there are no rebels within a hundred 
miles of Havana, and that the country is safer to visit 
than the District of Columbia." 

"I intended to ask you for a passport," said I. 

" You won't need any," heanswered. " A steamer leaves 
for New York within the hour. I will see you safe on 
board myself. ' 

He was so urgent that we started at once for the 
wharf, a company of Spanish infantry following as an es- 
cort of honor, I suppose. I parted affectionately from the 
General, and turned to Lee. " Pitz," said I; "what shall 
I say to the boys for you ? " 

"Just tell them that you saw me," he replied, and 
say to Olney, privately, that I think just as I did when I 
saw him last." 

The whistle blew, I sprang on board, and was soon at 
sea, firmlv convinced that the Cubans can never be con- 
quered. The evidence on that point is cumulative, and 
may be summed up as follows: 

First— Morgan and Call say so. 

Second — All the jingo newspapers say so. 

Third— General Lee thinks so, and 

Fourth— To cap the climax, General Weyler says there 



are no rebels, and. if there are none, how can they b 

quer- 

1 give the result of this mission in detail, because it will 
bfl of immense value to history. 

P. S.— Please inform me what you pay per line, when 

' you remit. 

THE death of Mr. Alexis Janin, on Wednesday last, 
robs the country of one of its most noted mining en 
is. He was born in New Orleans in 1846, and was 
educated in Paris, taking his first degree at the Sorbonne, 
the head government school in that metropolis. Later On, 
he took up the profession of mining in Germany, and then 
came to this country, where he became identified with the 
Comstock mines. He has been connected, in one way or 
another, with nearly all the larger mining properties. 

Whoever delights in the enjoyment of a good meal, elegantly 
served amid refined surroundings, should not fail to partake of the 
?1 table d'hote dinner served at Swain's Bakery between the hours 
of 5 and 8 p. m. The reputation enjoyed by this leading restaurant 
for pastries, confections and such delicacies is without equal. 
Orders by telephone will be filled without delay. 



For the finest and latest importations in gents' furnishing goods, 
go to John \V. Carmany, 25 Kearny St. 

A Cough Should Not bb Neglected. "Brown's Bronchial Troches " 
are a simple remedy and give immediate relief. Avoid imitations. 

Kelly's Corn Cure never fails. 25 cents. 103 Eddy street. 



Of vitality and energy, a good appetite, and per- 
fect health are obtained and endure by taking 



Peruvian 

^nnnnMaiiiiiiiiim 

Biuers. 




~| John PartridQe, 

306 California St. 

STATIONER, 
PRINTER, 
AND 
BOOKBINDER. 

Now is the time to order 
BOOKS tor the New Year. 
Tel. Main 614. 
Printing Department: 
43-44 Sceuart street. 

BRIEFS. 
CATALOGUES, 
PRICE LISTS, 
NEWSPAPERS. 

Day or night work. 
Twelve printing presses 
at your disposal 
No trouble to make esti- 
mates . 



NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored In warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates In first-class companies, or grain sold, 
If desired , at ourrent rates. 

OFFICE— 302 Sansome St., over tbe Anglo-Call tor nlt» B«nk. 



Weak Hen and Women 



Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy ; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. (Send for circular.) 



18 



SAN FRAN-CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897 



AT THE CAPITOL. 



Sacramento, Jan. 13, 1897. 

NOW that the Senatorial fight is over, it is to be hoped 
that the Legislature will settle down to work, for 
work it must if ever the mass of bills now before both 
houses are carefully "onsidered — as they are supposed to 
be — in the next six weeks still remaining of the session. 

What I said last week about the economical Assembly 
was only correct, — as events have since demonstrated, — 
in so much as the permanent organization is concerned; 
but in the amount paid for temporary organization the re- 
cord has been broken and in this regard come murmurs 
of the first scandal of the session. Over $4000 was paid 
the temporary officers and attaches, and I have seen 
figures where when Ed. Leake was Chief Clerk and tem- 
porary organizer of the Assembly the expense was hardly 
$400. This robbery of the Treasury, for it is nothing else, 
should receive the attention of the Legislature and Chief 
Clerks who are aDxious to please every member of the 
majority in order to ensure their re-election, should be pre- 
vented from perpetrating a repetition of this year's out- 
rage. As it is, the law permits the Chief Clerk to appoint 
such temporary attaches as he sees fit, and the gates for 
patronage-seekers being left open in this careless manner 
the hungry gang rushes in to help raid the Treasury. Of 
course, if these persons earned any part of the money paid 
them it might partly justify the steal, but they don't. 
The law provides that certain officers shall hold during the 
temporary organization. They are sufficient numerically 
and should be in ability to do the work required. 

The scandal to which I refer has been gossiped around 
all the week and it is to be hoped this petty larceny steal 
will be properly and thoroughly investigated. I simply 
give you the rumors and hope the publication of them will 
cause the offender or offenders to receive their just de- 
serts. In brief, so the story goes, all the temporary 
attaches who were allowed mileage payable out of the con- 
tingent fund of the Assembly, some six or seven in number, 
whose total mileages amounted to slightly over $100, were 
compelled to "divvy" with the Committee on Mileage's 
chairman. Assemblyman Oscar P. Breiling, of the 
Alameda County delegation, is chairman of this committee. 
Being told of the reports he denied the truth of them and 
said he would investigate. It is to be hoped that he will 
clear himself, for although Assemolymen come cheap, $50 
is a remarkably small price for one to sell himself and to 
seven persons at that. Of course, there may be some one 
else who is to blame aud perhaps Breiling is, as he says, 
innocent, so I give him the full benefit of the doubt. The 
fact remains and I have it authoritatively that the attaches 
were compelled "todivvv " their mileage. Besides this, I 
understand there is absolute proof that the temporary 
roll of attaches was stuffed by some one and a special 
committee is trying to tind out who did it. 

The fight won by L»slie Blackburn, of Alameda, for 
Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate was an unprecedented 
one. He was opposed by members of his own county dele- 
gation, and bitterly, too, 
and besides, was nomi- 
nated in caucus by a 
Senator from another 
part of the State. How- 
ever, he had made so 
satisfactory a record 
two years ago. and his 
supporters were more 
than enthusiastic in his 
behalf, so opposition was 
futile. Mr. Blackburn 
is a man of pleasing per- 
sonality, and his experi- 
ence has especially fit- 
ted him for the position 
he has ably and, I pro- 
phesy, will again satis- 
— factorily fill. In politics, 
it is needless to say. he 
is a staunch Republican, 
and is a leader in Alameda County, which by no means 
bounds the extent of his personal and political influence 







and popularity. As Deputy Sheriff, under Sheriff Hussey 
of Alameda county, he rendered the State effectual service. 
For four years, Mr. Blackburn filled the onerous position 
of Deputy United States Marshall of Arizona, and gained 
much praise from high quarters. He also took an active 
part in Virginia City politics in the early days, and can 
count as his friends to-day all the most prominent people 
of that State. 

In the house over 300 bills have been introduced and in 
the Senate over 275 bills, so it is evident there is plenty to 
do. 

The occasion of the election of George C. Perkins, on 
Tuesday, gave an opportunity to judge some of the orators 
in both houses. 

Iu the Senate Senator George C. Perkins was placed in 
nomination by Frederick S. Stratton, of Alameda County, 
and his speech was an oratorical effort that was worthy of 

the occasion and the person 
in subject. The galleries 
and the lobby of the Senate 
Chamber were crowded, 
and the attention given to 
Mr. Stratton's speech, and 
the applause that greeted 
the conclusion of bis effect- 
ive presentation, proved 
that Mr. Stratton's reputa- 
tion as an orator was well 
founded. 

Though a young man in 
years, Senator Stratton is 
easily one of the ablest men 
in the Senate, and, as a 
compliment to his abilities 
and energy, besides being 
Chairman of the Committee 
on Elections, he is a mem- 
ber of the important com- 
mittee on City, City and 
County, and Town Governments. County Government, and 
Township Organization; and Judiciary. 

Last November he was elected State Senator from the 
Twenty-Seventh District by a phenomenal majority, and 
that he will well merit the confidence reposed in him goes 
without saying. As an attorney, Mr. Stratton has already 
made his mark, and the list of important cases won by 
him not only show his ability, but also his versatility. 

Mr. Stratton has much important legislation in hand, 
and many of the bills he has introduced are of great im- 
portance, and their passage will result to much good to 
the public, who are not slow, it is to be hoped, to appre- 
ciate a man like Mr. Stratton, of more than average tal- 
ents and ability. 

Senator R. N. Bulla, of Los Angeles, who ably repre- 
sents the Thirty-seventh Senatorial District, seconded the 
nomination of Senator Perkirs. His speech was a splen- 
did effort, but not at all a 

surprise to his friends who W. -'-■ . : J .'aHH^^^H 
are fully aware of his abil- 
ities, for Senator Bulla is 
not alone a good talker, 
but an energetic and faith- 
ful worker as well. This is 
his first term as Senator, 
although he was sent to 
the Assembly from his dis- 
trict for two consecutive 
terms. At home Mr. 
Bulla practices law. and 
stands high in his profes- 
sion. As chairman of the 
very important Committee 
on Claims, Retrenchment, 
and Public Expenditures, 
and as a member of the 
Committees on City. City 
and County, and Town 
Government; Constitution- 
al Amendments; Elections; 





Senator R .v 



Judiciary, and State Prisons and Prison Buildings, Sena- 
tor Bulla will find plentv to do, and with his untiring energy 
and devotion to his work, will prove equal to the occasion. 






January 16, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 




Senator J. N. Gillette's seconding speech, also for Sena- 
tor Perkins, was not less eloquent than those which pre- 
ceded him. Senator Gillette has an easy style of delivery, 

_____^^__ and the First District, 

1 which he represents, has 
in him a lifting sue 

\-Senator Frank .Me- 
an, whose reputation 
as an orator is Stan- wide. 
Mr. Gillette is an attor- 
ney at Eureka, Humboldt 
County, where he has a 
large practice and a large 
constituency whom he will, 
1 am sure, serve with 
credit and ability. This is 
Mr. Gillette's final term iu 
the Legislature, but for 
six years he was City At- 
torney of Eureka. He is 
Chairman of the important 
Committee on City, City 
and Count}' and Town Gov- 
ernment, and a member of 
the Committees on Bank 
senai.,r ./. .v dUUttt a , d Banking, Commerce, 

Harbors, Rivers, and Coast Defenses; Counties and 
County Boundaries; Judiciary; and Public and Swamp 
and Overflowed Lands. Mr. Gillette has already intro- 
duced several important measures, and the fish industries 
of Humboldt County, and the State dairying interests will 
receive his careful and most energetic attention. 

Senators Dickinson and Smith also made seconding 
speeches, which were well delivered and nicely received. 

In the Assembly by far the best speeches were made by 
those gentlemen who nominated "lost causes." Judge E. 
A. Bridgford, of Colusa, placed James G. Maguire in nomi- 
nation, and E. J. Emmons, of Kern, nominated T. V. Cator. 
Their speeches were the best of the day. Judge Waymire, 
of Alameda, who nominated Senator Perkins, made a good 
speech, and Assemblymen Bettmann and Hill seconded the 
nomination. 

On Monday last Mr. George M. Francis, of Napa, was 
elected unanimously the bearer of California's electoral 
vote to Washington, and left San Francisco for that city 
on Thursday. Mr. Francis 
is one of the best-known T 
Republicans in this State, ' ; -^V 
and besides his good war '• 
record, has made a reputa- 
tion for himself as one of the 
leading journalists of that 
party. He gained his first 
taste of fighting in 1862, 
when, at the age of 18, he 
was sent from Wisconsin, 
where his home was, to help 
put down some Indian 
troubles in the north. That 
took three months, and then 
he went South to Kentucky. 
His commanding officer was 
the famous "Fighting Joe" 
Mower, a reckless fire- 
eater, and Mr. Francis had 
many opportunities of dis- 
tinguishing himself. He 

march to the Sea," and was fortunate enough to come out 
of the war with much honor and his life. Mr. Francis 
then worked on the old La Crosse Republican, and finally 
went to San Francisco. That was twenty-six years ago, 
and a year later he acquired an interest in the Napa Reg- 
ister, a strong Republican journal. Many leading journal- 
ists of to-day have at one time or another been his part- 
ners, but for the last fifteen years he has run his paper 
alone. He is a genial gentleman, and makes friends of all 
with whom he comes in contact. Mr. Francis expects to 
be absent from the State about a month. Mrs. Francis 
accompanies him to Washington, and when his duties are 
performed he will indulge in a well-merited holiday trip 
through the East before resuming his editorial duties. 




George M. Francis. 

participated in "Sherman's 



The Honorable loon Dttraerr, who representi tbe 13rd 
District tbe bi Ban 1 made 

Bob in the Assembly last work that ought to live in 
history. Speaking on a resolution to allow 1100.40 mileage 
to some attaches, Mr. Deanery, who has a lovely Up and 
: a colloquial manner of expression, said "MlsterSpeaker: 
I don't tink its wight to Impunede motives of de committee. 
More we are chewing de wag and wasting one bundwed 
dollars and eighty cents wert of time and do whole bill is 
only one hundwod dollars and forty cents. I tink de wesolu- 
tion ought to be adopted. See!" 

Pm, 

A Sovereign Remedy. 

DR. PARKKR'S COUCH c ire One dose will stop a oough. It never 
I falls. Try II. Price SSc. George DahlhonuYr & Co . >M Kearny street 




ANNUAL MEETING 
Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, rooms 37 
and 38, third floor Mills building, San Francisco, Cal., on 

TUESDAY, THE 26TB DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the hour of 1 o'olock p. M., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Satur- 
day, the 23d day of January, 1897 at 12 o'clock m . 

C 1 1. PERKINS, Secretary. 

Office— Rooms 37 and 38, third floor, Mills Building, N. E. corner Bush 
and Montgomery streets Sau Francisco, Cal 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hutchinson Sugar Plantation Company. 
Dividend No. 39, of 25 cents per share, of the Hutchinson Sugar Planta- 
tion Company, will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market St., 
on and after Friday, January 22, 1897. Transfer books will close on 
Saturday, Jan 16. 1897. at 12 o'clock u. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company 
The regular annual m-eliog of the stockholders of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship "lompany will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market street, 
San Francisco, Cal. , on 

THURSDAY, the 21st DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A M . for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors, to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before ihe meeting Transfer bojks will close on 
Saturday, January 9, at 12 o'clock M. 

E H SHELDON, Secretary. 
Office: 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Dr. LEANER, 



Most skilled 



Chiropodist 



on the coast 

Manicure attendants Corns, bun'ons. ingrowing nails, 
chilblains and warts extracted without pain by the New Treatment. 

Office, 702 Market St Office hours: 9 a m. to 6 p, m. 
Sundays, 11 a, m to 1 p m. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 



Q)R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Office and Residence: 409^ Post St.. San Pranoiseo. 
Office Hours ; 9 to 12 A. M. ; 1 to 5 p. M . 



Dervtlst, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 




IP last week was one of dinners, among the most notice- 
able of them being those given by Mrs. Josselyn, Mr. 
Whittier and Mr. Greenway, this week has been largely 
devoted to luncheons. It was too bad that Miss Julia 
Crocker should have had such disagreeable weather for 
her luncheon on Wednesday, her first appearance as host- 
ess since her return from abroad; her guests were all 
young ladies, who were invited to meet Miss Noyes. Mrs. 
Frank Pixley chose cards as the medium for entertaining 
the young friends of her niece, Miss Edith Nelson, on 
Thursday afternoon, and a large number were present in 
her pretty rooms that day. 

Mrs. Tingley Lawrence presided over a pleasant gathering 
on Monday evening, when original readings of reminiscences 
of life in Corea were given, under the title of "An Evening 
in the Land of the Morning." Mrs. W. J. Lowrey and her 
daughters gave a tea on Tuesday afternoon, and enter- 
tained a large number of guests. On Wednesday the 
Baroness Von Meyerim-k gave an "at home," when Miss 
Ida Chase Lee gave a talk on the '"Attitude of the Vocal- 
ist." Quite a number of our beaux and belles went across 
the bay to the cotillion in Oakland on Wednesday evening, 
and were guests of the ladies who chaperoned the party. 
On Thursday the Mills Club gave a tea in their new quar- 
ters in the Native Sons' Building, between the hours of 
three and five o'clock. To-day, at the studio of Miss 
Marie Withrow, Miss Ida Chase Lee will repeat her 
alist" talk. 

Pink, white and green were the dominating hues in the 
decorations at the wedding of Miss Clemence Reiss and 
Adolph Nordman, which took place at the Concordia Club, 
on Van Ness avenue, on Tuesday last. The ceremony 
was performed in the ballroom, which was wreathed with 
holly, hung with golden bells, and festooned with pale pink 
and" Nile green bunting, studded with golden stars, and 
underneath a pink anil green canopy at the south end of 
the room, Rabbi Voorsanger tied the nuptial knot. To 
the strains of the Mendelssohn wedding march the proces- 
sion entered the room, which was filled with guests, at 
half-past six, the ushers, Messrs. Reiss, Feigenbaum, 
Galland and Blum coming first; then followed the ring 
bearer, little Miss Jeanne Block, in a frock of white gauze 
over pink silk, and the flower girls, Rosa Block and May 
Nordman, similarly attired. Then appeared the brides- 
maids, Misses Julia Reiss, Nanette Reiss, Bessie Nordman, 
Wanda Galland and Helen Blum, gowned alike in white 
tulle over white silk, and carrying bouquets of pink roses. 
Miss Flora Reiss, as maid-of-honor, came next, wearing 
white tulle over pink silk, and finally the lovely bride and 
her father, Bernhard Reiss. The bridal costume was of 
white duchesse satin, trimmed with tulle and orange blos- 
soms, a tulle vail confined to her coiffeur by a spray of 
orange blossoms, and the bridal bouquet was of lilies of the 
valley. Mrs. Leon Nordman accompanied the groom, who 
was supported by Jesse Newbauer as best man. After 
the ceremony an elaborate dinner was served in the ban- 
quet hall of the club; then followed dancing until a very 
late hour. Coronado has been the scene of the honeymoon. 

February 4th is the date set for the wedding of Miss 
May Scott and N. Castle, and will be but a very quiet af- 
fair, owing to the recent death of the groom's father, etc. 
It will take place at the Scott residence, on Vallejo street. 

Among the engagements of the new year are those of 
Miss Sarah Bluxome and James Wooster, with the Easter- 
tide named as the time for their wedding. The engage- 
ments have also just been made public of Miss Teen Goodall 
and Hugo D. Keil, and of Miss Mabel Estee and Leonard 
Everett, and the wedding will likely be an event of the 
near future, probably before Lent. 

There have been many hops and small dances given at 
the Presidio during the past few years, the majority of 
which have been extremely pleasant, as button gatherings 



generally are, but the dawn of '97 will see the first ball 
Siven at that post in a long period of time. The officers 
of the United States Army stationed at the Presidio will 
be the hosts at this enchanting affair, which will take 
place at the Presidio next Tuesday evening, and, it is a 
foregone conclusion, but few, if any, regrets will be sent. 

It goes without saying that the football game of last 
Saturday was a gala affair, drawing such a crowd of 
society lights as have not before been seen together this 
winter The Army and Navy team have been made great 
heroes of for their defeat of the University fellows, and 
their heads are well-nigh turned by the compliments show- 
ered on them by the fair ones who witnessed their triumph. 
Another feather in their caps was the success of the 
cotillion arranged by the Army chaps for the Friday Fort- 
nightly Club, which was danced last evening, and which 
must receive fuller notice next week. 

The Colonial Dames held their first meeting in the new 
year at Mrs. Selden Wright's last week, the chief feature 
of the gathering being the very interesting paper read by 
Mrs. Henry Gibbons on "the causes which led to the 
American Revolution." Then there was tea and light re- 
freshments, 'and a lively chat much enjoyed by the ladies 
who were present. 

The Laurel Hall Club was another of those which had an 
entertainment last week, introducing some new arrivals 
in the city, Mr. and Mrs. Henri Fairweather, who gave 
" An English Mosaic of Old Ballads," a lecture followed by 
songs, which proved both interesting and entertaining. 

The fancy dress german of the Entre Nous Club, which 
will be given in Maple Hall on Friday evening, the 29th, 
promises to be a very brilliant affair. The ladies of the 
Club are busily preparing their costumes, some of which 
will be dainty "and fetching in the extreme, and all will be 
new and handsome, and the evening is looked forward to 
with expectant delight by all who are lucky enough to be 
the guests on that occasion. 

Other anticipated delights are the concert parties to 
hear Nordica and her company, who will warble for us 
next week. 

The remaining Thursdays in January and those in Feb- 
ruary have been named by Mrs. John fi. Jewett to be " at 
home " to her friends. Mr. and Mrs. A. Hecht will give a 
ball at the San Francisco Verein Club this evening, which 
will be a very brilliant affair. 

Recent arrivals from the Orient include Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Newhall, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Rothchild, all of 
whom returned from a trip to Japan by the steamer Coptic. 

Mrs. Yemans gave a very pleasant progressive euchre 
partv Friday, January 8th, at the residence of her father, 
Mr. i>. J. Staples, 711 Taylor street. There were five 
tables, the prizes being won by Mrs. H. L. Van Wyke, 
Mrs. J. B. Schroeder, Miss Rosaline Bryant, and Mrs. 
Blue. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Carroll and William Robinson Whittier 
will be married on the 27th inst. at the residence of the 
bride's mother, 1520 Van Ness avenue. Archbishop Rior- 
dan will perform the ceremony, and only the immediate 
relations of the contracting parties will be present. 

It is not generally known that Miss Maude Hines, who 
played such a dainty Ethel Oranger in A .Serious Tangle 
at the Alcazar last week, is an Alameda girl. Moreover, 
this performance marked her professional dibut. 

The Land of the Midnight Sun has brought to Morosco's 
the old-time appearance of melodramatic prosperity. 

Much of the worry attendant upon giving a large dinner or ban- 
quet can be despensed with by placing the whole matter in the bands 
of a competent caterer. Mr. Max Abraham, of 428 Geary Street, 
attends to all the leading society banquets in this city and by utiliz- 
ing bis experience and services thorough satisfaction is assured in 
every detail. 

We do all we can to help your grocer sell 
Schilling 's Best tea. 

If you don't like it, he returns your money 
in full ; we pay him to do it. 



January 16. 1897. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




EVEN apart from its biblical association, th. 
Jordan is of great In1 it falls 

over 1,200 feet At no point is it nu\ ren by 

small craft, to B mce, and presents the 

unique Bpectacleof a river which has never been inn 
flowing into a sea which contains not one living creature. 

Since Leo XIII. has filled the chair of St. Peter he 

has repressed the humorous side of his nature which made 
him greatly in demand as a diner-out while filling the 
office of nuncio at Brussels. Always severe in matters of 
propriety, he was deeply offended on one of these occasions 
by a baron who passed him a snuff box on the lid of which 
was enameled a feminine figure • n dahabiUe. Admirably 
controlling his annoyance, his future holiness replied*: 
"Very pretty! Is it your wife?" 

Manuel Garcia, the once famous singer, will cele- 
brate the ninety-first anniversary of his birth on April IT. 
His friends in London intend to commemorate the occasion 
in a fitting manner. Garcia was born in Madrid in 1805. 
With his father he went to Naples, where he became a 
pupil of the tenor Anzani. Later he became a professor 
at the Paris Conservatory and also at the Royal Academy 
of Music in London. Jenny Liud was one of his pupils. 

Germany has made some bold experiments at rail- 
road speed on the line between Berlin and Gorlita. The 
best performance was 65J miles, which was twelve miles 
better than the highest speed of the fastest German train, 
the Berlin Hamburg lightning express, which does 117] in 
31 hours. Ordinary German express trains make 491 
miles an hour. 

A recent sale of books in London brought out a 

curious fact. It was a presentation copy of Keats' poems, 
1817, first edition, with the autograph "To W. Words- 
worth, with the author's sincere reverence," and brought 
$230, but Wordsworth had never cut the leaves. 

The Paris Figaro, in remarking on the perfect 

figure of the beautiful queen of Servia and of the exquisite 
and stately carriage of her head, attributes it to the fact 
that her majesty has never used a pillow and that she was 
trained from girlhood to sleep on a narrow, hard mattress. 

To keep the 30,000 odd miles of telegraph line in 

order in Great Britain and provide for the proper dis- 
patch and delivery of the millions of messages that pass 
over them every month, entails an expenditure of about 
$11,250,000 a year. 

A useful charity called the London Spectacle 

Mission provides spectacles for needle-women and other 
deserving persons dependent on their eyesight for a living. 
Last year 726 applicants were provided with spectacles. 

"Our Society Blue Book" 

For the season of 1896-97 is now ready for delivery. It contains 
the names, addresses and reception days of most of the prominent 
families of this city and other points on the Coast. Also lists of 
members of the most prominent Clubs with their business addresses. 

San Francisco Street and Avenue Guide, Ladies' Shopping Guide, 
etc. Price Five Dollars. C. C. Hoag, Publisher. 

Trade supplied by Hartwell, Mitchell & Willis, Successors to 
Dodge Bros, 225 Post St., and 107 Montgomery St. 

Paso Robles. 
Our new mud bath house is finished. The arrangement of baths, 
dressing rooms, etc., are on the same floor. No stairs or steps to 
chmb. We are now unquestionably the finest sanitarium or health 
resort on the Pacific Coast. Best and health seekers are Paso Robles 
seekers, Rates, $10, $12.50, $15, and $17.50 per week. Climate warm. 



Camelline has, with just cause, been called the Queen of Com- 
plexion beautifiers. After repeated tests its ingredients have been 
found to be absolutely harmless, and its action on the skin is most 
beneficial. Camelline was originated by Wakelee & Co., the drug- 
gists, and it has met with astonishing success the world over. 



The Rio Grande Western Railway and connections are offering 
low rates and superior accommodations to all points East. Before 
purchasing tickets, call at 11 Montgomery street. 

W. H. Snedaker, General Agent. 




" uimMi "OZODONT ol your Druooisl. one 

complete package large bottle with box of powder will 
be sent prepaid by express or mall on receipt of regular 
retail price, 75c. In cash or stomps. Hall <ft nuCKEi, Prop... 
Washington St.. New Yp.k; 415 Holhorn Viaduct. London. Enfl- 



Pacific Towel Company No Ai.kPi.ee 

Furnisbes clean Towels at the following low rates: Clean hand 
towels each week, $1 per month; 12 clean hand towels each week; 
$1 50 per month; 4 clean roller towels each week, SI, 6 months 
6 clean roller towels each week, $1 35 per month. 

SOUND ABROAD THE FAME OF THE UNIVERSAL FAVORITE, 

Grab-flDDte Blossom Fertun.6 



^HH^fi 


wlTt&i 












(rati 




^mm&mM 









AND THE WORLD RENOW ED 

Grown Lavender Salts. 

' Chief among tlie fashionable soents is 'Crab-Apple Blossoms.' a 
delicate perfume of the highust Quality; one of the choices tever produced." 
— Court, Journal. 

'• It would not be possible to conceive of a more delicate and delightful 
perfume than the Crab-Apple Blossoms, which is put up b# the Crown 
Perfumery Compauv. of London. It has the aroma of Spring in it, and one 
could use It for a lifetime and never tire of it " — New York Observer. 

No articles or the toilet have ever been produced whioh have been re- 
ceived with the enthusiasm whioh has greeted the Crab-Apple Blos- 
som Perfume and The Crown Lavender Salts. They are literally 
' the delight of two worlds, and are as eagerly sought in London and Paris, 
as in New York. They are daily bringing pleasure comfort, health and re- 
freshment to thousands of homes, and are sold by all dealers in perfumery. 

Annual Sales, 
More than Half a Million Bottles. 
Exclusive Productions of the 

Crown Perfumery Co. 

177 New Band St., London. 

Beware of fraudulent imitations, which 
cnly disappoint the purchaser. Sold 
only in the bottles of the company, with 
the well-known Cro wn Stopper. No 
others are genuine. 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1897. 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charier, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up, S3.000.00 Reserve Fund, $500,000. 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 

HEAD OFFICE 80 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
lamo. and Nelson. Urltlsb Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Saodon, B. C. ; 
Kaslo, B, C 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Busings. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Sodth America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital 13,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1, 18M).. 3.158,129 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Modlton 2d Asa't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank: London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
SonB; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres: Virginia Citt (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Australia and New Zealand — Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York. Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland. Or., Los AngeleB, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen. Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Maln, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Chrlstlania. Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital tl ,000,000 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, ? a Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. Albert Mjller, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe. Secretary. 

Direotors— C. S. Benedict, E. A Bruguiere, F. W.Sumner, Albert Mil- 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V. H. Metcalf. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital (2.500.000 I Paid UpCapltal 15,000,000 

Reserve Fund 1850,000 

Head OrricE 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal elties of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBATJM 1 „„„„„„,, 
C. ALTSCHUL } Managers. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK of san francisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Dp Capital 1 1 ,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vioe-Presldent 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crooker, E, B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 1 Paid Dp 11,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. c. 
Agents at New York— J. a W. Seltgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART )„.„._.„ 
P. N. LILIENTHAL f M"»g«" 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus tfi.25O.OO0 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King M anager 

H. Wadswortb Cashier I F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

1BRANCHES. 

N. Y. Clty.H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge. Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 



In response to many inquiries from 
all parts of the country about the 
Railway and Dock Construction 
Company 



The officials hereby give full infor- 
mation in regard to the company, 
its business and prospects. 



The company offers 20,000 shares of stock for sale in lots to suit 
purchasers at $20 per share. The par value is $100 per share— -full 
paid and unassessable — stockholders have no individual liability 
whatever. The company has no indebtedness of any kind— is in 
solid financial condition— and, as there are no bonds nor mortgages, 
all the earnings go to the stockholders. 

The adoption of this Company's system of construction by the 
United States Government, or any Foreign Government, or by any 
one of the lartxe cities in America or Europe will cause the stock to 
rise above par ($100) immediately. 

The most conservative investors, old shrewd bear operators on the 
stock exchange, have bought this slock and confidently predict it is 
sure to pay large dividends and sell at over $200 a share as the Rail 
way and Dock Construction Co. commence business under much 
more favorable conditions than did the Bell Telephone Co., whose 
stock rose from about $10 to over 200; or the original Edison Electric 
Co., whose stock rose from 45 to $3000 a share, or the many other 
companies owning useful inventions whose stocks rose rapidly in 
value while paying large dividends to the alert original investors. 

Many prominent men in banking, railway and financial circles 
and other expert judges of stock values predict that this stock will 
pay large dividends and will sell at over $200 per share for the 
following reasons: 

The Railway and Dock Construction Company controls all the 
rights, titles, patents and interests in and the sole, absolute and ex- 
clusive right to manufacture and sell the new indestructible piles 
that do away altogether with the millions of wooden piles heretofore 
used everywhere, which only last a short time, as alternate moisture 
and drying and the marine worms soon destroy the wood, and leave 
a deceptive shell, incapable to sustain a load that requires the full 
strength of the original pile. Old wooden piles must be continually 
replaced at great expense. 

Nothing can compete with the indestructible Pile in the construc- 
tion of piers, docks, bulkheads, sea-walls, foundations for bridges, 
lighthouses, jetties, breakwaters or other improvements in rivers, 
harbors or on the sea coast. 

This pile is an absolute necessity in railway trestlework as it 
guarantees safety, and it will last forever, and tnere is an enormous 
demand for it. 

One defective wooden pile derailing a train causes a loss of many 
thousands of dollars in lives and property destroyed. 

Applications are pouring in from engineers, contractors and rail- 
way officials all over the United States. These men are quick to see 
the certainty of profit. They are perhaps better able to judge than 
others, because, out of a total of 1891 railroads, 373 of these railway 
companies are now preparing to build 20,547 miles of new line. The 
great superiority of the Railway and Dock Construction Company's 
system of solid, substantial, indestructible trestle work is causing 
the demand in this special field. 

Estimated earnings from this one source of profit will pay $7 per 
share annual dividends — this is equal to 35 per cent, cash dividends 
per year on stock bought now at present price of $20 per share. 

Other and larger sources of profit will come from contracts now in 
view, viz: — 

In place of the old wooden docks, covered by temporary sheds, 
which now disfigure the water fronts of our cities, this company will 
build solid, indestructible piers, on which permanent iron, stone or 
brick buildings are put up just the same as on land. 

Private owners of dock property as well as dock officials in the 
numerous cities are becoming aware of the great advantage of using 
the Railway and Dock Construction Company's system of building 
indestructible piers to make a solid foundation, upon which large 
buildings can be erected, from which they can get big revenues for 
rentals, etc. 

$27,000,000 have already been expended in improving Southern 
harbors and their approaches. 

In projects now under way over fifty million dollars will be spent 
in improving navigation in rivers, bays, etc., throughout the coun- 



January 16, 1897. 



SAX PRANC1 TKR. 



*3 



Irjr on jetties, breakwater*, and other work in which the indestructi- 
ble Pile is a (treat necessity. 

The city of New York is spending »/..n00 000 • year iniproTinn the 
city water (ronl. 

In a private conversation Hon. J. ."crgtant Cram, ex- President of 
the Board of Pock Commissioners said: "There is an ImmanM 
fortune in this company's system of ■,-iruction ' 

The l.S. Senate Committee have rf.->mmended the expenditure 
of eiuhty million dollars for the protection of our seacoast. About 
ten millions a year will be spent daring the next eight years. 

The I'nited States Government spent about $10,000,000 in deepen- 
ing the entrance of the Mississippi to divert tidal tollon hv old style 
work, which will be supplanted in future bv the Itailwav'and Dock 
Construction Company's system. JOOOO.OOO has alreadv been ex- 
pended on toe two immense jetties in the nav at Galveston: they 
are simply loose rock dumped into the water. Each jetty is about 
4K miles long and forms a continuous pyramid u» feet wide at the 
bottom. taperiiiL- to 15 feet tvide at the top above the water. The 
Kailway and Dock Construction Company build indestructible 
jetties of the same size at the bottom as the top and save this enor- 
mous waste of stone and labor. 

The "St. Louis Critic" strongly advocates the adoption of this com- 
pany's system of indestructible jetties to deepen the Mississippi at 
St. Louis. 

To provide additional funds to execute some of this work, the 
company offers 20,000 .'hares to the public in lots to suit at the 
low price of $20.00 per share in order to have the stock quickly 
taken. There are no salaried officials. The money derived from the 
sale of stock, when not used in protitable construction work, remains 
in the company's treasury. 

Many leading marine engineers and experts say: "This com- 
pany's system of construction is coming into universal use in build- 
ing all improvements in rivers and harbors." 

As the business in sight is too large for this company to handle 
alone, the subsidiary companies now beiDg organized in the 
principal States each pay a certain amount in cash and one-third 
of their capital stock into the Railway and Dock Construction Co.'s 
treasury. In addition to large sums in cash the company will re- 
ceive about $20,000,000 in securities in this way, on which dividends 
will be paid from the earnings of the subsidiary companies. These 
dividends all go to the holders of Railway an I Dock Construction 
stock. 

With a large surplus and an ample cash working capital the com- 
pany will hold assets of $200 per share for each share now offered at 
$20 when all details are completed. 

Application will be made to list the shares on the stock exchange. 

Owing to the financial depression and uncertainty before the elec- 
tion the Railway and Dock Construction Company would not accept 
numerous contracts for work amounting to about three millions of 
dollars. They were offered first mortgage bonds in payment but the 
bonds could not be sold at that time in New York or London at 
satisfactory prices. English bankers are now negotiating to p'r-e a 
large block of Railway and Dock Construction stock and apply 
for an official quotation on the London Stock Exchange. 

The officials and large stockholders are well-known practical 
financiers and business men, whose names are at once a synonym for 
trustworthy, capable management and a guarantee that any stock 
in which they invest is safe, solid and profitable. Among them are 

Among the stockholders are: 

Geo. W. Dunn, Esq.. president of the company, head of the bank- 
ing house of George W. Dunn & Co., New York, and president, 
director and trustee of other corporations ; he has been prominent in 
Wall Street for 20 years as a careful level-headed financier; Hon. 
Thomas Murphy , vice-president, ex-Senator, Collector of the port of 
New York under President U. S. Grant; R. A. B. Dayton, Esq., 
counsel for thecompany, Temple Court, New York ; Eugene Harvey, 
Esq., second vice-president, banker, Drexel building, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; R. M. Stanbrough, Esq. . Kingston, N. Y.; GeorgeD. Hilyard, 
Esq., contractor, N. Y. ; W. R. Childs, Esq., of the Calumet and 
Hecla Copper Company, Calumet, Mich.; Edward A. Wilson, Esq., 
secretary; M. Hoff, assistant secretary; George B. Shelhorn, Esq.. 
receiver, Montgomery. Tuscaloosa and Memphis Railway Co., 
Montgomery, Ala; Y. Carryer, Esq., of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company, Field, B. C, Canada; Howard Swineford, Esq., of 
Howard Swineford & Co. Richmond, Va. ; Jacob Deyo, cashier, 
Huguenot Bank, New Paltz.N. Y.; S. J. Gifford, Dunkirk, N. Y.. 
and several rich and influential railway and political magnates who 
will have seats in the Board of Directors later on. 

Address all applications for stock and remit for the number of 
shares wanted to the Financial Agents of the company, Messrs, 

GEO. W. DUNN & CO., 
2 Wall St., New York. 

by check, draft, money order, registered letter or by express ; or 
have the stock sent by express C. 0. D. 

The right is reserved to reject any application for stock. and to 
allot only a part of the shares applied for, and to advance the price 
without notice. 



BANKING. 



- am tarn 

AMTin 11 a Burnt, Vloo-Proaideel. town Uet. Ouhler. 



Savings and Loan 
Society. 



101 



Montgomery St., Cor. of Sutter St. 

(Formerly 819 Clay street), S F , Cal 



The Oldest Incorporated Savings Bank In the State. 



Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Capital Stock Paid-up in Gold Coin $750,000 



175,000 

$925,000 



A. N. Drown 
E C. Burr 



Reserve Fund 



DIRECTORS : 

S. C Blgelow Horace Davis G. E. Goodman 

Isaac Hyde Arthur A. Smith F. H Woods 

Willts E Davis 

Loans made at lowest rates on approved collaterals and on City and 
Country Real Estate. Term and Ordinary Deposits leceived. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital, 81,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, 1300,000. 

OFFICERS 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. I S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 

Directors— James D. Ptaelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, O. G. 

Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Prank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 

and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells. Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks, WhenopeuiDg accounts send signatuie. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1895 $24,^02,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by cheek of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Is made for 

f»ass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ngs,6:30 to 8. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St.. S. F. 



Capital actually paid up In Cash, 81,000,000. 
Deposits, Dec. 31,1895 130,727,586 59. 



Reserve Fund I 715,000 

Guars" teed Capital . . tl ,200,000 



DIRECTORS. 

B. A. BECKER President 

EDWARD KKUS81 Vice-President 

DANIEL MEYER 2d Vice-President 

H. HorBtman, Ign. Steinhart, Nic Van Bergen, Emil Route, H. B. Russ 
D. N. Walter. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
No. 526 California St., 



S. F. 



William Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS. 

S. L.Abbott, Jr. 



O D 

W. S 



Baldwin 
Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutohen 
J. B. Lincoln 



Tru the SAN FRANCISCO LAUNDRY, 

Office, 33 Geaiy street. Telephone Main 5125. 
Oakland Office— 864 Broadway. Telephone Main 658. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16/ 1897. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 

(Pacific system.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. | from January i, V&7, 



I Arrive 



•6:00 A NUes, Sao Jose, and way stations 8:46A 
7 :00 A Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 8 :45 P 
7:00A Benicia, Vacavllle. Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Orovllle, and Redding, 

via Davis 6:45 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 

Napa, Cahstoga, and Santa Rosa 6:15 P 
8:90A NUes, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysvllle, Chieo, 

Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:15 P 

•8:30A Petersand Milton »7:15P 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Raymond 
(for Yosemite), Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
Sales, Demlng, El Paso, New 
rleans, and East.. .. . . . 4:45 p 

:00 A Martinez and Stockton 4:45 P 

9:00A Vallejo 6:15 P 

Niles, San Jose Livermore, and 

Stockton 7:15p 

•1 :00 P Sacramento River steamers *9:0Up 

1 :00 p Niles, San Jose, and Livermore . . B:45 A 
tl:80p Port Costa and Way Stations.... f7:45p 
4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Callstoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9:15 a 

4:00p Benicia, Vacavllle, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysvllle, 

Orovllle, and Sacramento 11:15a 

4:30 P Lulbrop. StorUton, Modesto. Mer- 
ced, aod Fresno, going via Niles, 

returning via Martinez 11 :45 A 

5:0Op I Express, Tracy, 

Fresno, Santa Barbara, and Los 

Angeles 10. 45a 

5:00 p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45a 

6:00 p European mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45 A 
6:00 p Havwards, NUes and Sao Jose... 7:45 a 

J7:00p Vallejo t7:45P 

7:00P Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysvllle, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 11:15 A 

110:00p "Sunset Limited." Fresno. Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans, 
and E as t g 13 :45 P 

San ta Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, HoulderCreek, Santa Cruz 
and way stations 5:50p 

*S:16p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. 
New Aimaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations •11:20 A 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 9:50 A 

til :45P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose 

and way stations J7:20p 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

6:45 a San Jose and way stations (New 

Aimaden Wednesdays only) 1 30 p 

8:16 a San Jose, TresPinos, Santa Cruz, 
PaciHc Grove, Paso Roble?, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and 

principal way stations 7:00 p 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 6:0u p 

11:30 a Palo Alto and way stations 3-30 p 

•2:30 P San Mateo. Menlo Park. San Jose, 
Gilroy. Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz, 
« «« Sallnas - Monterey, Pacific Grove »10:4Oa 
•3:30 p San Jose and way stations.. . 9-45 a 

*4 :30 p San Jose and Way Stations *8 :05 A 

5:30pSan Jose and principal way 

stations *8:45a 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:35 a 

tll:45p San Jose and waystations f7:45p 



Sam Leandro and Havwards Local. 


(•800 Al 
8:00A 
9:00 a 




7:15 A 


Melrose, 


'9:45 a 


10:00 A 


Seminary Park, 




ill. 00 A 


FlTCHBURG, 




8:00 P 


San Leandro, 




3:00 P 


and 




4:00 P 


Hatwards 


6:45 p 


6:00 P 




6:15 p 


5:30 p 
7:00 p 


( Runs through to NUes. 


7:45 p 
8:45 p 


8:00 p 


t From Niles 


9:45 p 


9:00 P 




10:50 P 


ttll:lS P 




.ftl2:00 p 



CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

,Jf, TOm San Francisco— Foot or Market street 

(Slip H). 

•7:15.9:00, and 11:00 a. m., 11:00, •2:00,13:00. 
•4:00, 15:00 and «6:00 p.m. ■»•>". www. 

From Oakland— Foot ot Broadway 

^:%»% i S : : ggp A M '' ;tl3:00 ' ,1:00 ' >2:00 ' 

a for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

____ . .Sundays only, 

tt Monday. Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

lays and Saturdays 
^Sundays and Thursdays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



DEBIT AND CREDIT. 

HARRY CRAGIN WALKER, IN TRUTH. 



I never was giod at figures, 
But now that the ball is done 
I'll square my accounts, and balance 
Expenses with girls and fun. 
Let's see; the tickets two dollars. 
And four for thecarriage and pair, 
And three lor the jacqueminot roses- 
She looked out of sight I declare. 
That's nine. Well, I guess that com- 
pletes it 
From the liability side. 
And now for the assets— one item 
Is all that I find for a guide. 

And yet that lone figure's sufficient 
To more than offset it— and this 
Is the fractional part of a minute 
That 1 spent in a last good-night kiss. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY CO. 

Tiburon Pkbbt- Foot of Market Street. 



FOR SHAME, FOR SHAME! 

CY WARMAN, IN JUDGE. 

I was gazing through the window 

Of a Paris studio, 
A kind of hot-bouse window, 

At a marble Trilby there, 
With rounded knees and dimpled arms 

And— O. like drifted snow, 
And wondered if on all this earth 

Walked woman half so fair. 
And all about were people 

Painting pictures of the same. 
Who paused not when 1 entered, 

Bat, at a signal, they 
Laid down their paint and pencils, 

And, 0, for shame, for shame! 
The marble maid stood up and yawned 

And smiled and walked away. 



TWO WOMEN.— boston courier 

The Beauty. 

The bloom of the rose in her soft cheek 
glows. 
She's as fair as the new-born day. 
And her eyes are as bright as the stars at 
night. 
For she takes off her bat at the play. 

The Fright. 
A towering hat with a plumaged crest 

At the play she is bound to wear, 
And her face is so homely she has to rest 

Her cheeks at night on a chair. 

George Morrow & Go, 

(Established 1854.) 

fifty ftND GRAIN 
Commission Merchants. 

39 Clay St. and 28 Commercial St., S. P. 

Branches at Bay District, lngleside, and Third 
St. Hay Wharf. Telephone No. 36. 



Thos Price 



ARTOTH F. PBICB 



Eanic 



THOS. PRICE & SON 

ASSAY OFFICE, 
CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 
BULLION ROOMS, 
and ORE FLOORS. 
524 Sacramento street. 

S s "Australia", for 
Honolulu only. Tues- 
day. January 26, at 2 
p m. 

S. S. " Monowal," 

Thursday February 
4th, at 2 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa J. D SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., 
Agents. 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
MarhetSt..S an Francisco. 

The Grand Pacific $L*stss£r 

MRS. ELLA CORBETT, Proprietress. 
Furnished rooms by the day, week, or month. 
Telephone: Grant. 60?. 




IJPJ 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 8:00, 11:00 A M; 18:35,3:30 
5:10. 6:30 p M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11:30 pm. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A M; 1:30 3:30, 5:00, 
6:20 pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:15, 7:50, 9:20, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 
3 :40, 5 : 10 P M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :55 
and 6 :35 PM. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AM; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:25 PM. 
Between San Francisco and SchuetzenPark, 

same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 
gg* Sundays. 


In Effect 
Oct. 14, 1896 

DESTI'TION. 


Arrive in S. F. 
Sundays. Week 


7:30 am 
3:30pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 
9:30 am 
6:00 pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, ■ 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 
6:10pm 
7:35 PM 


8:40am 
10 :25 AM 
6:22pm 






Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle, 




















8:30 pm 


8:00am 


7:3dpm 


6:22pm 








7:30 am] 8:00am ^^kfahj 7:35PM ! Iate * 


3 : :3upm| 8:00a >' 1 SuernevtUel 7:35pm $*£* 


7:30am| 8:00am 1 Sonoma, 110:40am |8:40am 
5:10pm1 5:00pm 1 Glen Ellen. | 6:10PM 16:22PM 


7:30am| 8:00AM 1 c, Br ,„„ t ._., 110:40am 110:25am 
3:30pm| 5:00pm 1 »eoastopoi. | 6:10pm |6:22pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyservllle for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay and Lake- 
port; at Hopland for Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs; at Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs. Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper 
Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day's, River- 
side. Lierley's, BucsneU's Sashedoin Heights, 
HuUville, BooneviUe. Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs. Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, 
Usal, Willltts, Canto, Covelo, Laytonville, Har- 
ris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE-650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 



H.C. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN t 
Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf. San Fran- 
cisco for ports In Alaska, 9 a.m.. Jan. 9, 24. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Jan. 4,9, 
M, [9, 24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka {Humboldt Bay), Steamer -'Pom- 
ona," at 2 p. M.Jan. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20. 24, 28, and 
every fourth day thereafter 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a.m.: Jan. 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, and every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Jan. 4. 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 
28. and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 a. h. 

ForEnsenada, Magdalena Bay. San Jose del 
Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La Paz. Santa Rosalia, 
and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 
a. u , 25th of each month. 

The company reserves right to change steam- 
ers or sailing dates 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO 
For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 1 P M, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, calling at Kobe (Hiogo). Naga- 
saki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo re- 
ceived on board on day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, Feb. 2,1897 

Doric Tuesday, February 23, 1897 

Belgic (via Honolulu). Saturday, March 13, 1897 
Coptic (via Honolulu). ...Thursday, April 1, 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's 
Office, No. 421 Market street, corner First. 



D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 






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Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 



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Vol. L IV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 23. 1897. 



Number 4. 



Printed and PublUkid etrry Saturday by tfte proprietor. FRED HARRIOT 1 
V, h'/arny ttreet. San Franeieeo. Entered at San FrancUco Pott- 
office a* Second-date Matter. 

The office of the NEWS LETTER In .\Vir York City it at TrmpU Court; 
and at Chicago. 903 Boyce Untitling, {Frank E Morrieon. Eottrrn 
Repretentatire). ichere information maybe obtained regarding tubtcrip 
tion and adrertieing ralet. 



THE Christian Endeavor visitors will be 
heartily to San Francisco next summer, 
good field for their efforts. 



welcomed 

This is a 



THE "defective flue" is a most wearisome iteration. Is 
it not possible for the reporters to write in plain 
English of a faulty chimney? 

THE shouters for restrictive taxation of foreign trade, 
which is so-called protection, are willing to leave the 
mass of the people to the mercy of trusts and other com- 
binations in restraint of trade. 



THERE has been so much war talk during the past 
twelve months, that Congress should be disposed to 
grant the requests of General Miles for liberal appro- 
priations. This would mean nearly a million dollars for 
fortifications of San Francisco. Lime Point would then 
become, in reality, the "Gibraltar of the Pacific Coast." 



THE Chamber of Commerce has taken up the cudgels 
against extravagance in the Harbor Commission, and 
the imposition of unnecessary quarantine tolls on shipping. 
This is one of the most expensive ports in the world for 
ships, and it ought to be one of the cheapest. Our foreign 
commerce must languish so long as the existing abuses 
and exactions continue. 



EVERY possible precaution should be taken against 
the introduction of the East Indian or bubonic plague. 
The national health authorities have already moved in the 
matter, and our local and State officials should likewise 
be alive to the danger. In Bombay thousands have been 
stricken, the deaths being in the proportion of two out of 
three. 

ONE of the greatest abuses in this State is the allow- 
ance of mileage to public officials, in amounts far 
above the actual cost of transportation. The law should 
restrict mileage, in all cases, to the sum actually expended. 
Under the present system, members of the Legislature, 
for example, receive several times as much as the railroad 
fare to and from Sacramento. This is an imposition on 
the taxpayers. 

NO more of the people's money should be expended on 
the Home for the Training of Feeble-Minded Children. 
The State should not encourage the production of this sort 
of offspring. The institution is simply a means of enabling 
parents to shift upon the pub'ic the burden of caring for 
children who should be provided for at home. Pity for the 
unfortunate should not blind legislators to the mischievous 
results of the policy represented in the Home mentioned. 



MANY of the bills introduced at Sacramento are either 
whollv needless or altogether absurd. What could 
be more superfluous than the bill "to prohibit unauthor- 
ized persons from wearing the rosette of the Loyal 
Legion?" It would be just as much in order to prohibit 
anybody but a mandarin from wearing a colored button on 
bis cap. These things are the subject of severe regulation 
in China, but have no place in our American system of 
government. 



THEHomePi is Exhibition at Los Angeles is a 
Rood stroke of enterprise. It shows that tbe south- 
ern ( ■ 1 1 v is making good progress in manufacturing indus- 
tries, and tends to give them Increased support. 



IN the re-election of Senator Jones, Nevada showed due 
appreciation of the services and abilities of one of the 
ablest men in the upper house of Congress. No public 
man in this country has surpassed Senator Jones in the 
championship of the silver interests of his State, and he is 
entitled to his reward. 



THE Board of Directors of the Public Library in Plain- 
field, N. J., at a late meeting, resolved that as pur- 
veyor of clean and elevating literature, they could not 
take the responsibility of retaining on their subscription 
list papers of the New York World class. The rival of the 
World is also debarred from their reading-room. These 
journals can do even more harm in the family than in the 
library, which suggests the next step in the warfare 
against evil. 

THE new Governor of the State of Washington intro- 
duced an innovation upon the occasion of his induction 
into office last week. The usual custom has been to at- 
tend the inauguration of the Governoi with carriages, and 
all the pomp and circumstance of mimic military display. 
Governor Rogers walked with his friends to the Capitol in 
the ways of Jeffersonian simplicity, although he is a Popu- 
list. It will be a good thing for the people of that State 
if he continue in this meek and unostentatious path. 



PRESIDENT Jordan, of Stanford University, has made 
an unanswerable argument in favor of exempting 
such educational institutions from taxation. The Univer- 
sity now pays taxes to the amount of thirty thousand dol- 
lars annually. This sum could not be more profitably ex- 
pended for the benefit of the State than in enlarging the 
usefulness of the institution. And so with all other 
academies of non-sectarian learning. Our Constitution 
should be amended in this respect, to conform to the lib- 
eral spirit of the age. 

THE pending Nicaragua canal bill gives the Government 
of the United States control and direction of the 
waterway, through the provision for ownership of seven- 
tenths of the stock and the selection of a like proportion 
of tbe directorate. The stock would be issued to the 
Government in consideration of the guaranty by the latter 
of the bonds of the company. With the safeguards pro- 
vided, there is every reason to believe that the canal earn- 
ings could be made to pay the bonds as they mature, as 
well as a reasonable return on the stock. The existing 
canal company and the Government of Nicaragua are 
fairly entitled to the provisions allowed them by the bill. 

IT is to be hoped that the Post Office authorities at 
Washington will see fit to close immediately with the 
offer made them by our Board of Harbor Commissioners to 
rent the Government a large and desirable portion of the 
new Perry Building for the sum of $1,000 a month. Post- 
master McCoppin has given the matter his closest atten- 
tion, and is satisfied that this figure is not exorbitant, and 
that the interests of the public will be served by securing 
quarters for the Postal Department in the new depot. It 
is owing to this spirit of pettiness and senseless economy, 
ever manifested by certain officials and a portion of our 
local press, that San Francisco is often deprived of bene- 
fits when just within her grasp. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



REFORMING THE COURTS. 

^N avalanche of proposals is upon us for reforming 
the judiciary of the State. Things have got to be so 
unbearable that a demand is heard on every hand for re- 
lief. The calendars of all the Courts are choked, the 
judges claim to be oppressed with work, finality in litiga- 
tion is almost unknown, and in the vast majority of in- 
stances it is cheaper to abandon a just claim than to en- 
deavor to enforce it by law. In fact, there is a virtual 
denial of justice in this State that greatly detracts from 
its desirableness as a place of residence and business. We 
are not of those who believe that the cause of all the mis 
chief is to be found in the Judges, who, as a rule, are better 
than the system they administer. Considering the inade- 
quacy of their official salaries, and their obligations to 
practicing lawyers at election times, the marvel is, not 
that we secure the services of the best men, but that we 
get as good men as we do. As long as we have an elective 
judiciary, we shall have judges on the Bench too weak to 
discipline the all too many shameless lawyers of the period, 
who, bound by no rules of court and by no code of honor, 
turn the judicial machinery into a vehicle of injustice and 
oppression. If the judges were strong enough to frame 
strict rules to govern the proceedings in their courts, and 
to enforce them with uniformity and firmness, more than 
one half the tricks, subterfuges, perjuries, delays and 
other abominations that now so often render our courts 
potent for mischief, but impotent for good, would be done 
away with. But a stream cannot rise higher than its 
source, nor can even a judge, strive as he may and often 
does, become superior to the influences that secure his 
nomination and election. 

One great evil is that we have too many lawyers who 
must either "get up" cases or starve. They provoke 
litigation, and. if it is without merit, so much the better. 
In that case, their skill is exercised in worrying the other 
side and in warding off, or in devising means to evade a 
decision. Thus it comes that final judgments in this State 
are seldom worth the paper they are written on. The 
attorney has anticipated the result, and by means, pro- 
bably false, fraudulent, and colorable, has enabled his 
client, a rascal like himself, to escape the consequences of 
a too long delayed execution. This is not the exception 
to the rule, but is the very rule itself. It is a fact that 
the names of some 2,000 practicing lawyers appear in the 
San Francisco D rectory. 200 capable men would suffice 
for all the ligitimate business there is to do, and that pro- 
bably is about the number of the fittest that deserve to 
survive. If the balance could be set to shoveling sand, or 
to some other useful occupation, we could dispense with 
one half of our present courts and yet keep abreast of the 
work in hand. Even as things are, two short rules could 
be framed that if rigidly enforced would curtail litigation 
at least one half. First, contracts between attorney and 
client contingent upon the result, ought to be declared 
contrary to public policy and void. No officer of the 
court ought to be pecuniarily interested in the result of 
litigation. It is contrary to the best traditions of the 
Bar that he should be, and, if the decisions in the books 
always prevailed in this State, an attorney so offending 
could be disbarred. Then again, litigation is not made 
sufficiently onerous to the losing side. It ought to cost 
more to improperly bring or defend a suit. In extreme 
cases, the judges ought to exercise their present power of 
awarding exemplary costs. In older States and countries 
where the practice of law is subject to strict regulation, 
the invariable rule is to make the losing side pay all the 
costs of the winning one. That is equitable and just, and 
is the best preventive of litigation known among men. A 
simple amendment to the codes to that effect would work 
wonders. We should soon hear no more of crowded 
calendars, congested courts, or overworked judges. 

It goes without saying that reform which means reduc- 
ing litigation to a minimum is not to be expected from 
lawyers in practice. Their interests lie the Other way, 
and self preservation is the first law of nature. Nobody, 
therefore, need be surprised that proposals to increac 
number of courts, which means an enlargement of the 
volume of litigation, are the best thchiwyci -offer a 

long suffering people. It is claimed that twelve depart- 
ments of the Superior Court are not enough for thi 



If thev are not, it is a fact shameful to litigants, lawyers, 
judges and all concerned. The Bar association proposes 
to actually create three new appellate courts. The State 
is to be divided into three judicial districts, and an appel- 
late .ourt, consisting of three judges, is to be given to 
each. These Courts, we hasten to say, are not intended 
to supersede the Supreme Court, but are to be an inter- 
mediary between it and the Superior Courts. By this ar- 
rangement there will, in certain cases, be two appeals in- 
stead of one. and, consequently, much more litigation, in- 
stead of less. It is a lawyer's measure all through, and 
must have caused a merry twinkle in the eye, and a laugh 
in the sleeve of the man who drafted it in the name of re- 
form. It would be amusing, if it were not hurtful to the 
body politic, to see a lot of hungry lawyers hastening to 
the'Capitol, button-holeing bucolic members and pretend- 
ing to clip their own professional wings in the interests of 
judicial simplicity! Reform of the courts is badly needed, 
but it will not come to us that way. 

The Senate It is said that the Senate will hang 

and tn •. up the arbitration treaty and let it 

Arbitration Treaty, die. The excuse is made that there 
is no immediate necessity for it; no 
issue pending to which it is applicable, and that it will be 
time enough to consider some such measure when circum- 
stances arise to bring it within the domain of practical 
politics. That is not the tone or temper of public opinion. 
Not much is to be expected these times of the U. S. 
Senate, but its members might reasonably be presumed to 
know the force of educated thought there is at the back of 
this measure. The best minds of the country look upon it 
as a beneficent proposal, well calculated to render war be- 
tween the two great branches of the Anglo-Saxon race 
impossible. The fact that there is now no burning issue 
in existence, only tends to show that this period of calm is 
just the very time in which to ratify it. To wait for the 
coming of a time of passion would be folly. The very ob- 
ject of the treaty is to prepare fo>- and guard against the 
possible arrival of such a period. We suspect the real 
truth is that the Senatorial dislike of President Cleveland 
is at the bottom of the disinclination to ratify a treaty 
that has so much to recommend it. There is too much 
glory in it for a man whom certain Senators so cordially 
hate. But they may as well yield and do the graceful 
thing at once, and thereby save their own credit at home, 
and the country's abroad. That, or a similar treaty, has 
got to come, and, when it does, due credit will be given to 
the President and the able Secretary of State by whom it 
was first proposed. 

The Examiner It would be interesting to know 

and the what failure to levy tribute upon 

Park Commissioners, the Park Commissioners has 
caused the Examiner to assail the 
business capacity, the uprightness and ability of the gen- 
tlemen who have charge of the people's great play-ground 
in this city. Certainly no one who is acquainted with the 
methods of that paper will for one moment imagine that it 
is sincere in its attack upon these well-known and highly- 
re-pected gentlemen, for it is a clearly-recognized fact 
that the Examiner interests itself in nothing that does not 
concern its own pocket-book. The fact that the men who 
are faithfully serving the people as Park Commissioners 
are among the foremost citizens of this city, that they are 
men of wealth, undoubted character and standing in San 
Francisco, count for nothing with this disreputable repre- 
sentative of all that is bad in journalism. If there be any- 
where in this city evidence of faithful performance of duty, 
of work wisely planned and skilfully executed, it will be 
found at Golden Gate Park. Comparatively a few years 
ago. where now beautiful tropical life, refreshing foliage, 
winding roadways and delightful retreats greet the eye 
and gratify the taste, was nothing but a wilderness of 
sand. The work accomplished shows that the people's 
money has yielded a satisfactory return. Taken alone, the 
Park is an unanswerable argument for the wisdom of its 
management. That the Examiner should trail its dirty 
Bourse across this fair picture, and seek to bring discredit 
and suspicion upon honorable and patriotic citizens, is but 
another evidence of its vicious and criminal character. 



January 33. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO m:\vs LETTBR. 



Ramarkaoia Trad* The year IV* saw n much moi • 
Daveiopmant. mark able turn in tl ,r for 

aware of. The report of I 

tistir- 

much less, and exporting go mui h more, that tbe ba 

of trade is now heavily in favor of this country. The! 

are exhilarating and inspiring in the highest degree. For 

many years prior to 1896, the national trade balance with 
other nations was on the •■• of the ledger. We 

took more from them than they l«ought from us. \\ 1 
all that we had to sell, which was not a little, but wi 
away all too much money for high-priced luxuries that we 
could well have done without. An era of extravagance 
had been upon us for years, and although in 1893 we were 
suddenly confronted with a money panic and hard times. 
it took us two years to begin to learn to mend our way.-. 
retrench our individual expenditures, and live within our 
means. But it is, happily, clear that the nation, as a 
whole, has learnt the needed lesson at last. During the 
first ten months of ls;i(;, for which alone the figures are 
complete, the balance of foreign trade in favor of the 
United States amounted to the immense sum of $266, 086,709, 
whereas, during the same period of the previous year we 
had imported considerably more than we had exported. 
Between the showings for the two periods there is all the 
difference in the world. The one led up to the hardest of 
hard times: the other is the unquestionable precursor of 
wide-spread and general prosperity. Up to November, 
cereals had not appreciated much in price, so that the in- 
creased business of the year is not due to the accident of a 
season by which Europe is now being forced to buy our 
grain in larger quantity and at higher prices. The results 
of that, for us, happ}' accident, will come into the returns 
for 1897, and will cut considerable of a figure there. The 
export of merchandise is accountable for over 70 per cent, 
of last year's increase of exports. Wheat, cotton, corn, 
and other products of the farm make up the other 30 per 
cent. Exports of bicycles and bicycle appliances increased 
nearly $3,000,000 ; shipments to England, Canada, and 
Australia having grown from almost nothing a year ago to 
a very active and flourishing trade to-day. Exports of 
cotton cloths was larger by $5,661,859 in the ten months of 
1896 than in 1895, nearly all of the increase coming in our 
trade with China and Canada, two fields of commerce once 
surrendered almost wholly to the English manufacturers. 
Of machinery, our total exports increased $4,593,076 over 
1895, and here we have invaded the personal domain of the 
European manufacturer, for Great Britain and the Euro- 
pean States took from us upwards of five millions more 
than in the preceding year. In practically every other 
branch of American manufacture, including leather, lead, 
zinc, wood and paper goods, manufactured tobacco, and 
canned provisions, there has been an increase over 1895 
running from 5 to 200 per cent. Our Treasury reserve of 
gold is no longer in danger of depletion. We are now lend- 
ing part of our trade balance in London and Berlin, where 
money is actually worth more than in New York. This 
trade development, remarkable as it is, will show even 
more astonishing enlargements during 1897.' The better 
prices now being realized for cereals and cotton will largely 
increase the figures. These signs of the times are not to 
be mistaken, and are full of good cheer. 

Greater New York Greater New York will contain a 
and Its Charter. population at least six times larger 
than that of San Francisco. It em- 
braces the consolidated cities of New York, Brooklyn, 
Long Island, and environs. As our people seem unable to 
make up their minds as to what they really do want in the 
way of a charter, it will be interesting to note that tbe 
Empire City finds no like difficulty. A charter commission, 
made up of some of the ablest men of the State.^ has 
framed a measure that gives a fair degree of satisfac- 
tion, and is pretty sure of adoption by the Legislature. It 
provides for a legislative department, consisting of two 
chambers, but it takes care to leave this little Parliament 
absolutelv powerless, except when it agrees with the 
Mayor, 'it cannot vote bills, involving appropriations of 
public money, or increasing municipal charges, or grant- 
ing franchises, except after an interval of five days after 
the publication of an abstract of the measure, and then 



■ 1 In a 
1 
unanimity ,. 

obtained. In ad ven unllm 

tivo power, ami to the Legislature 

in the matter of or removals, except that 

for cai proven, the courts may order the 

discharge of faitl ers. The Mayor icted 

for two years, and to i*> pi ry of $15,000 a year, 

Very specially noteworthy features of the new charter arc 

the safegua d to tbe legislative power to giant 

franchises, and the provisions for final assumption by tbe 
city of all street monopolies. No new franchise 

granted for a longer period than twenty live years, and 

all franchises, with their plant, appurtenances, property. 

etc., arc to revert to the city at the termination of the' 
period for which they were to originally run, and the city 
may by ordinance provide for tbe operation thereof by 
itself, or by lessee- The price thus paid for the fran- 
chise is the value of the improvements effected under it. 
These are all striking proposals, that, in view of our timid 
local discussions over charter matters, seem to border upon 
the hazardous. Yet it is reasonable to believe that there 
is greater wisdom in the greater city. At any rate, it is 
time that San Francisco undertook the control of her own 
affairs. Anything is better than a jumble of laws that 
defeat each other. A general law could be passed at this 
session that would considerably ameliorate matters. Such 
a law should have been devised immediately after the de- 
feat of the charter was known, but then, the interests of 
this municipality are never looked after as those of a pri- 
vate corporation are. We need a great civic leader. Have 
we the makings of one in Mayor Phelan ? 

Success To The No class of Government employees are 
Letter-Carriers. more in favor with the public than the 
letter-carriers. They are noted for 
faithful and attentive devotion to their onerous duties, and 
daily exercise a large responsibility in tbe delivery of im- 
portant communications, valuable documents, registered 
money packages and other matter intrusted to their care. 
They know many secrets gathered in the regular discharge 
of their tasks, but whoever hears of a letter-carrier re- 
creant to his trust? And yet these efficient and hard- 
working servants of Uncle Sam must toil through four or 
five years of probation before receiving regular pay from 
tbe Government. During these preparatory years of ser- 
vice as "substitutes" their meager pittance of about $30 
a month comes out of the pockets of tbe "regulars," who 
are themselves inadequately paid. Under the present 
system, after securing a regular position, the pay is but 
$600 the first year; the second year $800, and the third, 
$1,000. For seven years the Letter- Carrier's National 
Association has been striving for the passage of an Act by 
Congress to provide for better remuneration. The measure 
now on the Speaker's desk was favorably reported from 
committee, and passed the Senate unanimously in June 
last. It provides, among its other good features, for a 
new or additional class, whose members will be entitled to 
$1,200 a year. This will be for carriers of seven or eight 
years' service, and it will enable the substitutes to get 
regular employment earlier that is possible under the pre- 
sent classification. It is known that 230 Representatives 
favor the bill, and if it should reach a vote at the present 
session it will certainly become a law. We hope it will 
be pushed, for it is a most deserving measure, of which 
the people must cordially approve. 

The Degeneracy A lamentable sight is just now being 
of the witnessed all over the country. A 

U. S. Senate. majority of the States are engaged in 
electing men to the United States 
Senate who are unfit to go there. Not a man entitled to 
the distinguished consideration attaching to a member of 
the highest law-making body in the nation, is visible any- 
where along the line. Small men of little mental calibre, 
and no legislative experience, are being sent to occupy 
seats once filled by the greatest in the land. Peffer, Hans- 
borough, Kryle, Mitchell, Tillman, and their like, are being 
made the successors of Webster, Clay, Calhoun, Benton, 
Sumner, and Seward. It is not alone that from such small 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



Western States as Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, 
Nevada, Dakota, and Washington, that these nondescripts 
are being packed into the United States Senate. New 
York, Pennsylvania, and Illinois, the three most populated 
States in the Union, are doing hardly as well as some of 
the wild and wooly States. New York had a great candi- 
date in the person of Lawyer Choate. Known all over 
the country for his learning and ability, and supported by 
all that was clean and decent in his State, he received just 
7 votes, whilst 144 were cast for Tom Piatt, the most ras- 
cally Boss of modern times. In Pennsylvania, since the 
retirement of the Camerons, Quay's power has become 
absolute. He names whom he pleases as his colleague, and 
the Legislature obeys. With a young ward politician of 
Philadelphia, named Penrose, he has just beaten John 
Wanamaker by a majority of two to one. In Illinois, a 
" boodle" Alderman named Madden, who runs with the 
"machine," is called "Billy" by the boys, and makes no 
pretentions to any but "practical" politics, is said to be 
sure of election. These three States gave McKinley in 
November pluralities reaching the unprecedented total of 
717,501), and therefore underwent what may be supposed 
to be a new baptism in the cause of honesty, purity, and 
good faith in Government. That was their answer to the 
Populist programme of repudiation and dishonor, and yet 
in each case there rises up out of the victory, in greater 
power than ever, the despoiling, corrupting power of the 
Boss, holding Legislatures in his hands, dictating Senator- 
ial elections, and levying tribute on corporations and pro- 
tected industries. Is it so great a marvel, after all, that 
the popular party has become a socialist party? Whither 
are we drifting? 

Compulsory It appears that there are something like 
Attendance 15, Ooi) children of school age in San Fran- 
At School, cisco who attend neither public nor private 
schools. That is the estimate of the Census 
Marshals, and close observers of matters of this kind be- 
lieve it is not far wrong. The City Superintendent of 
Public Schools now proposes to enforce the law rendering 
attendance at school during certain months of the year 
compulsory. It seems anomalous that in these days of 
education and enlightenment, so many children of parents 
who must necessarily pay taxes, should be found wander- 
iug the streets instead of undergoinga training to fit them 
for the battle of life. The schools are free to all, and no 
excuse on the ground of poverty is available. If judiciously 
enforced by a discriminating official, the compulsory law is 
a good one. Of course, in a few extremecases, which may 
well be believed to be the exceptions to the rule, it may 
be found necessary to extend some leniency. There are 
children mentally or physically unfit to attend school. 
There are others the sole support of widowed mothers. 
But there are a great many more who are able to attend 
school, and whom it is little less than a crime to keep 
away from there. They are mostly the children of unedu- 
cated parents, who need to be taught the value of a school 
training. To all such, the compulsory law cannot be too 
soon applied. At the same time, where is the accommo- 
dation for such an influx of new scholars? Our under- 
standing is that the existing school buildings arc fully 
occupied already. It is in order for the Board of Educa- 
tion to make known the facts. 

A Few Census A glance at the latest French census re- 
Facts veals some curious, and at the same 
From France. time some alarming conditions. It ap- 
pears that while all other countries of 
Europe are gaining in n , that of France is practi- 
cally stationary, with a decided tendency toward diminu- 
The largest proportion of births" to lull deaths is 
in England, where it is 171. The average of all the 
European countries is 1 hi. Hut in France it is only 111]. 
At the beginning of the century Frame had nearly twice 
tnepo of the United Kingdom. At present 

withstanding the steady loss in England by" emigration. 

that country has 40 millions against less than 39 

m France. France has gained at! 

jflg this century, but scarcely any of that .small increase 
has been gained since 1890. The gain for the last five 
years has been only 124,1 .ami it is to be noted that 



S7.000 of that is in Paris alone. In the same period Ger- 
many has increased nearly three millions. The causes 
which are charged with this condition in France are be- 
lieved to be the practical refusal of all except the labor- 
ing classes to bear children; the many obstructions to 
marriage presented by the laws; the too strict control of 
parents over the marriages of their children, and the tra- 
ditions which render a dowry requisite to the wedding of a 
daughter. Marriage in France is made rather a matter 
of business, with an eye single to the pecuniary gain, in- 
stead of being left to the sentiment, the mutual love and 
confidence of the sexes. Great effort is made in France 
to provide a dowry for the daughter, but if the son is to 
be provided for, or launched in business, the daughter's 
dowry is sacrificed to him and she condemned to spinster- 
hood, for what Frenchman would take her sons </<•/.' The 
increase which France is receiving is from the working 
classes, and that in itself presents an interesting question 
as to what the effect is to be on the social conditions of 
the future. Placed as France is, shoulder to shoulder 
with the growing military powers of Europe, it is not 
probable that with decreasing numbers she can maintain 
her relative strength in armies. Altogether a problem is 
presented, the solving of which may change the map of 
Europe. 

The Examiner's The Examiner has several libel suits 
OwnLibei Suits, hanging fire. It always has. Never 
ready to prove its allegations, because 
they are nearly always malicious and seldom provable, it 
betakes itself to the miserable, beggarly, contemptible 
method of hiring pettifogging lawyers to weary the plain- 
tiff out. It has within the past six years gotten rid of 
more libel suits in that cowardly way than the News 
Letteb has had brought against it during the more than 
forty years of its existence. When the libelled one is not 
a woman, but proves to be a great deal of a man, the 
Examiner frets and fumes and bullies to the last moment 
and then — takes water. After hounding Heath of Fresno 
almost to the gallows, that is how it acted towards him. 
It was particularly abusive andmalicious in the epithets it 
hurled at Ex-Auditor Strother, vaunted its courage, and 
pretended that it wished for nothing better than law pro- 
ceedings. When, however, it was taken at its word, it 
whined like a whipped cur, begged for mercy, andaccepted 
it at the hands of the man it had done its level best to ruin. 
The apology it had to publish was simply pitiful in its 
humility. With such a record, it had better attend to its 
own libel suits, before intruding its malice into those of 
others. It does not like the News Letteh and it would be 
surprising if it did. This journal is considerable of a cor- 
rective to the hatred, malice, and all uncharitableness 
that, perhaps, cause Mr. Hearst's paper to be feared, but 
certainly not loved. The News Letter caters not to 
the crowd, bids not for their nickels, and fears not their 
frowns. It has a constituency as wide as the world, made 
up of thoughtful men and women, who have nothing in 
common with the vilest sheet published on American soil, 
which is saying not a little. The young scapegrace who 
owns that sheet may flout his mistress in the face of San 
Francisco's respectability, may publish her erratic sayings 
in his two papers, may dishonor the name of the father 
who begat him and of the mother whose fortune he is 
squandering, but all that will not constitute him a worthy 
journalist, or a fit censor of other men, or a true man or 
anything else that men esteem. He has, however,— one 
redeeming trait^he never fails to read his News Letter. 
If he keeps on he may yet learn that egging on libel suits 
is contrary to journalistic ethics, beneath contempt, and a 
game that two can play at. 

Salaries and The salaries paid to public officials are 
Pickings. frequently only a small part of the emolu- 
ments of their offices. Inexperienced 
citizens wonder why there is invariablv a warm contest for 
membership in the Board of Health and the Board of Edu- 
cation, no salaries being paid the members of these bodies. 
It is not impossible that if the salary of every elected offi- 
cial in this city were abolished, there would be as great a 
- ever to possess the offices, for politicians would 
find means of making monev out of them bv methods as 



Januaty 23, 1897. 



PR \n\ n-.K. 



legitimate, in their opinion, a~ those pursued now. There 
must t* compensations in the I ir men 

who have ordinary bi 1 to and 

provide for, would not be 

:or term after term. A I ■ 
lor instance, when text-books for the course of study in 
the public schools are chosen. Some of I 
the Hoard are peculiar. The shorthand text booh Is an 
example. Phonograph; is a part of the course of study 
at the Polytechnic High School. It would naturally in- 
supposed that if the young people there arc to become 
good shorthand writers, able to read the notes of others, 
and to write notes that others < an read, they should he in- 
structed in a standard system. Instead, however, the 
High School pupils are obliged to study a style of short- 
hand that is wholly dissimilar from the recognised systems 
of phonography in this country. There is no intention of 
casting any reflection here on the so-called Eclectic 
tem that is in vogue at the Polytechnic. It may be good 
enough, although leading reporters have avoided it be- 
cause of its alleged lack of practical utility. The only 
point made is that with other systems in general use 
throughout the country, the School" Directors were led to 
select a text book which shorthand writers in this city 
did not employ at all, and the local sales of which have 
since been limited mainly to the High School. What argu- 
ments were used to convince the directors that the High 
School pupils should be forced to purchase this book, the 
price of which is high, may be conjectured. 

On the Good The question of improving the roadways, 
Roads which is a growing agitation in many of 

Movement. the States, makes timely any testimony 
bearing on the need of such improve- 
ments. On this point we note a valuable contribution 
from a practical farmer. He states that he lives on a 
little ten-acre place, eight miles from a railway station. 
He hauls from the station two tons of fertilizer, making 
eight loads for one horse, and six hours for each trip, 
which he calculates to be at a cost of $4 80. His produce 
consisting of 500 crates of vegetables, is hauled to the rail- 
way at a cost of $42.60, requiring, as it does, seventy-one 
trips in the present, condition of the roads, which are 
heavy and sandy. With the roadway properly improved, 
he could haul his fertilizer in four trips of four hours each, 
at a cost of $1.60, and his vegetables in thirty- five trips at 
a cost of $14. The time spent on the roads requires him 
to hire an extra man. He figures 1hat the bad condition 
of the road is a tax of ten dollars per acre each year upon 
his little farm, which eould be saved in horses, time and 
hired help if the ways were put in proper condition. The 
same argument applies on a city street. It would he in- 
teresting to know what San Francisco pays in horseflesh, 
broken wagons, and loss of time for the condition of some 
of her pavements. More than enough, surely, to improve 
them. A Boston paper says that it costs five dollars to 
swear on the streets of that city. With the temptation 
to profanity provoked by our Market street pavement, 
that figure would be considered remarkably cheap. The 
interest in good roads which is awakening in California is 
commendable, and should have the best of support. The 
News Letter is pleased to notice the good work being 
done by our townsman, Mr. Marsden Manson, and the 
Bureau of Highways, of which he is an active member. 
The system of road repairing in the State has been to the 
last degree chaotic. The report of the Bureau, just 
issued, shows that the preliminary work on the basis of 
better methods is well begun. The capable men who are 
doing it should be kept at it. 

"Our Society Blue Book" 
For the season of 1896-97 is now ready for delivery. It contains 
the names, addresses and reception days of most of the prominent 
families ot this city and other points on the Coast. Also lists of 
members of the most prominent Clubs with their business addresses. 

San Francisco Street and Avenue Guide, Ladies' Shopping Guide, 
etc. Price Five Dollars. C. C. Hoag, Publisher. 

Trade supplied by Hartwell, Mitchell & Willis, Successors to 
Dodge Bros, 225 Post St., and 107 Montgomery St. 

Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething . 



•Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" tor your 



The King ot Pills Is Beeoham's— BEECHAM'S 



A GREAT RUBBER CONCERN. 

ON ' 

. I Market street, ihl 
having re- it,, enlarge its store t" 

mpany has been in bui 

in San EYanoisOO for more than thirty A has 

grown Steadily to the present time. Three years ago it 
tabllsh a branch house al Port 
land. <>r., where ;i :.irue three story building at 7:: "."> 
First : an additional war. : t 68-70 front 

Btreel are occupied. In this city a large factory is in 
nit operation al -1: 92 Stevenson street, where are 
made all kinds of rubber goods for mechanical purposes; 
also a factory for making oil clothing, which occupies 
nearly the entire block on Virginia avenue, between Cali- 
fornia avenue and Mission street, where are employed 
from ninety to one hundred operatives. The output of 
this plant is among the largest in the country. The busi- 
ness of the Goodyear Rubber Company has doubled within 
the past three years on this coast, and its goods are found 
in every market where rubber is used. The company is 
sole manufacturer of the celebrated crack proof min- 
ing boots and Stout's patent snag-proof mining boots. A 
complete line of rubber stock of all kinds is carried, includ- 
ing belting and packing hose, the company's celebrated 
Gold Seal brand of which goods is ur.equaled. Several 
hundred persons are constantly employed by the company, 
of which F. M. Shepard is President, R. H. Pease Vice- 
President and Manager; J. A. Minott, Treasurer; and C. 
P. Runyon, Secretary. It is one of San Francisco's great 
mercantile institutions and its success is the direct result 
of undoubted merit. 




NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 tons. Regular warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat, 

Money advanced at lowest rateB of interest on grain stored in warehouses. 
Insurance effeoted at lowest rates in first-class oompinles, or grain sold, 
If desired, at current rates. 

OFFICE— 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-Call forul*» Bsnk. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 80 

Amount per Share 15 cents 

Levied December 14, 1896 

Delinquen t in Office January 19, 1897 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock February 9, 1897 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Ofi&ce— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St,, San Francisco, Cal. 

Josepli Glllott's Steel Pens, 

Gold Medals. Paris 1878-1880. These pens are " the best 
in the world. " Sole agent for the United States. 
MR. HENRY HOE. BUohn Street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 





' We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moort. 

THE taste of the Widow of Beyrueth is 
improving. It is no longer really com- 
pulsory to associate the abdominal embon- 
the general gelatinous blowsiness, 
!***™ ihe leathern lung and the cast-iron throat 
with the leading lady of the Wagnerian 
drama. Lillian Nordica combines a seemly, if not sensa- 
tional personality with the better traditions of lyric opera 
and the rugged dramaisms of new Germany. She tries to 
mean what she sings and half the time succeeds — which is 
a big average ; for song is elusive as we take it now in a 
bigger dramatic significance. And Nordica's Marguerite. 
who might be Mrs. Tanqueray, or Nora Helmer, or any- 
body besides the Gretchen of song and story, is only a 
large specimen of what Nordica's temperament is not. 
Nordica is not heroic in the unfeminine sense; but she is 
too regal, in the deck of cards sense, too sure, in the 
woman of the world sense, too obviously actorial, in the 
musical sense, to flutter the pulse in Faust. She sat at the 
spinning wheel, her fingers busying over the flax, and 
hummed, abstractedly, indifferently, "Once there reigned 
a King in Thule." And this was as it should be. It was 
real art, not art art. Then, with as much consternation 
and rapture as a housemaid would exhibit on finding the 
morning newspaper in its accustomed corner of the door- 
mat, she discovered the jewel casket, put on the glittering 
ear-bobs and the soft seductive pearls and sang to them 
what might have been a respectable treatise by Mr. Bok 
on the propriety of a young, unmarried woman wearing 
such " scenery and effects'' with post-prandial costume. 
And she met Faust with the cynical philosophy of Magda, 
who says, " it's always a tenor with us," and treated him 
with practical consideration and untumultuous, unen- 
thralled, unimpassioned, bade him to her bower. And the 
devil gloated his Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! for a white soul sullied. 

But it was an easy going soul, that which Nordica found 
in Marguerite, and its whiteness was rather world-worn, 
and it went to its dechastening with excessive presence of 
mind, and Faust was as much sinned with as sinning. 

All this may be very modern and very unneurotic and 
Nordica, no doubt, has her own opinion of Marguerite's 
temperature, which is not wholly to the comfort of reju- 
venated Dr. Faustus, or closely faithful to Goethe, or illu- 
minative of Gounod's score, or enchanting to an audience. 
# * » 

It was said to me in extenuation by several sorrowful 
musicians, that it was impossible to gauge a singer's 
ability in the limited opportunity offered by a single act of 
an opera, but even then I could not get it through my 
head how two hours more of an un-Gounodian and un- 
romantic Marguerite was going to make her any better; 
particularly when a few moments before the same singer 
had sung the audience into frenzied quivers with Krkel's 
Emebetn aria. It was this tempest of Hungarian melo- 
drama that made the night Nordica's — this and the two 
encore songs which followed it. Otherwise the night was 
anybody's— even poor, old Scalchi's; for Scalchi poured 
her depleted best into everything she sang. And when 
Nordica clicked her heel before the flaming h,„r ,/, force 
which ended the Magyar aria, and the wonderful notes 
welled out from her tense open throat, like everyone 
in the Baldwin, my chair grew too small for my enthusiasm. 
1 wanted plenty of room and the moral courage to swing 
it. In ihe fever of that moment I would have sworn 
she could conquer anything— anything!— from tubercu- 
luscious Violetta to Trilby's Chopin Impromptu. But she 
drew the line easily and swiftly at Marguerite. 

Nordica is a great singer, a fabulous singer in her own 
dramatic lines — and they are not narrow lines, either, 
withal they exclude Marguerite, for she sang "When Love 
is Kind" with fragile fancy, giving it the life, color and 
humor of a comedy in miniature, and she sang a lullaby. 
by Luck-stone, with a kiss and a caress, and a motherly 
pat in every tone. I am not taking the standard of Miss 



Any-old-person's ballad recital when I say Nordica sang 
these little songs exquisitely — she made creations of them. 
There was a picture and a story in each, and her enuncia- 
tion was a lesson in Euglish. 

* # * 

Peter Robertson. 1 see by several morning papers, says 
that Scalchi's "Annie Laurie " isalesson in Scotch. Now 
that I think of it the burr did come out in rich, wide 
plaids; and, unless sentimentality seizes me — for 1, too, 
have a heartspot with Scalchi written on it in indelible 
italics, which might impair my truth and make me banal, 
I must begin and end my eulogy by echoing clansman Rob- 
ertson. Scalchi's Scotch is superb. Still, a whole square, 
three deep, of fuzzy-kneed Highlanders, accompanied by 
four bands of bagpipes, and Ian McLaren and James 
Barrie and a glossary to boot, cannot make me forget the 
time when Scalchi could sing — sing till you thrilled to the 
marrow with richness of it, the great, big, round perfec- 
tion of it. And of this voice, which belonged to history 
years ago, what is left ? Not enough full notes to buy May 
Yohe a new lordling. The upper tones are broken and 
blared, the lower are husky, timberless and coughsome. 
Yes; the method is still there; but method is madness 
when it attempts to gild an old and tarnished voice. 

* # * 

Just judging from appearances, aud names and their 
significance, I should have take Berthald for Dempsey. 
He looks more that way. But Mr. Berthald is by no 
means a bad man if you judge him with your ears. He 
has a somewhat obscure but resourceful tenor and he 
made a great deal more out of the Prize Song from Die 
Meutminger than the orchestra evidently intended he 
should; and he shared his encore with the composer, 
which was tactful in more ways than one, for I fear he 
would be a bit ponderous in ballads. And with this excep- 
tion encores meant ballads every time Monday night. 
I haven't the least idea why. Mr. Dempsey sang that 
touching temperance poem ''Drink to Me Only With Thine 
Eyes" in a pure steadfast way. which suited that song 
much better then than the same pure steadfast way did 
Mephisto's music. 

The orchestra, composed of Mr. August Hinricbs and 
his musical union friends, and under the direction of Luck- 
stone, experienced perhaps less unhappy accidents than 
usually attend this sort of an orchestra on this sort of an 
occasion. 

The audience was a swollen success. 

* # * 

Thursday was Scalchi's night, so far as Trovatore was 
concerned, and, if it comes down to fine distinctions, 
Scale his even in the concert half of the programme. 
Nordica sang 'Dich Theure Halle," from Tannhaiuer, in 
drawing-room spirit. Of course one cannot demand atmos- 
phere and intense Germanism amid the rigor of concert 
surroundings and with a frugal piano accompaniment, but 
Nordica achieved such fine fury, such almost Amazonian 
passion in the Magyar aria Tuesday night, that we ex- 
pected more than a Vere de Vere reading of the Wagner. 
However, she atoned handsomelv with three encores, 
A roe's "Where the Bee Sucks,"* Foerster's " Ich liebe 
dich," and "Robin Adair, all sung imaginatively and sym- 
pathetically. And I wondered again over the singular 
contradictions of this musical temperament, which can woo 
such sweet romance from simple ballads aud fail so lament- 
ably in Marguerite. No one expected a great Leonora 
of Nordica, and no one was surprised. She patronized 
Verdi as a funny old-timer who dealt in fancy work trage- 
dies to the beat of waltzful triplet strings. Not so with 
Scalchi, who is no modern, and whose heart is true to the 
trustful old music of a byegone day. Scalchi did her noble 
best; she fought time and nature, "and occasionally a big 
broad note surged out and swept us back to the other 
days, when Wagner was an upstart and Verdi king, and 
Scalchi the contralto of the world. 
» * * 

I would not advise you to take a Three Dollar mood to 
the Columbia. Tin Devil's Auction is not worth it. After 
four furious acts of dances, songs and gags, harassed by 
decadent scenery from the year 1, and the most villain- 
ously played music I have ever heard from any orchestra 
in any place, I left the theatre with but two moving 
mements within recall. The first was Miss Mayo's 



January 9 ] 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS I 



sinj:inir of ;i doctored and diluted ■■ 

in which she h begingered ■■ >a 

rapt grit and enterprise, that I wondered bow 
found her nay into this ooe I • , 

stead of taking the broad and shiny path of raudi 
where, by every note and pmile and gesture, she I" 
There is not u woman at the < • rpheum. nor has then 
io many moons, who could light the gas for Mamie Mayo 
In the other bright moment occurred a pair of old fash 
ioned pantalettes — the kind grandmother used to make. 
This spectacular garment, charged with lively hitman 
freight, and aimed plural end at the audience, came to be 
wedged in a car window during The Trials of the Trolley." 
Many persons present pronounced it the chief attraction 
of the eveniug. and I understand the management relies 

upon this feature as one of the principal drawers 

# # « 

Mr. Philip Hastings, who is known to the local author- 
ities in connection with "He Ain't In It." "(Juess Again. 
and other songs which disturbed the peace and incited riot 
in '90 and '91, and to dramatic critics by his skill at adjec- 
tive and fluent circulation of the advance notice, is one of 
the new attractions at the Orpheum. Mr. Hastings 
is not to be seen upon the stage. Owing to the money- 
moon of Mr. Moore, who is balancing his experience with 
the fame and fortune of the queen of scandal, Mrs. 
Dimond (now about to elevate the stage). Mr. Hastings 
is retained by the Orpheum management in the capacity 
of prose-poet and press agent. On the other side of the 
lights the Franzes, a family of seven men, women and boy 
acrobats, do an absorbing turn. John Wilson and Bertha 
Waring accomplish some capital gags, and Binns and 
Binns, the well-remembered musical comedians, have 
secured a new lease of Orpheum favor. Ashton Stevens. 

A wonderful actress in a wonderful play opens at the 
Baldwin Monday night. — Modjeska in Magda. This play 
and player are linked in dramatic history. It was 
Modjeska's acting of Magda that established this grim, 
absorbing play in the Saxon and Latin tongues. Bern- 
hardt and Duse have each paid tribute to Suderman's 
master creation, and many who have seen the three 
actresses in the part, give the preference to Modjeska. 
Joseph Howarth, an actor of big reputation, heads the 
supporting company. The stage direction is in the hands 
of George Osbourne. Magda is the bill until Saturday 
night, when Mary Stuart will be presented. 

The Tivoli will also launch a big production on Saturday 
night — Aladdin, which George Lask, Ferris Hartman, and 
their associate librettists, composers and compilers, have 
been brewing for some months. The Tivoli is getting to 
be very timely in the matter of spectacular pieces. Jack 
and the Beanstalk opened almost instantaneously with the 
big New York holiday show, and now Aladdin comes 
just as the big pantomime by that name is making 
a sensation at Drury Lane, London. During the week, 
until Saturday, Maritana will be sung. 

Bessie Clayton, who has been singing and dancing with 
the Trip to Chinatown company in Australia, and Alcide 
Capitaine, an serial wonder from Italy, are the new cards 
for the Orpheum. Mr. Hastings says that the crowned 
heads and press of Europe have pronounced Miss Capitaine 
"the perfect woman," because her remarkable muscular 
development is completely concealed by her superb 
physical beauty. Johnnies, take warning! 

Nordica will give an extra concert on Sunday night, and 
sing again the famous Erszebrth aria. The quartette from 
Rigoletto concludes the programme. The matinee to-day 
will bring out the famous closing scene to Siegfried; Nor- 
dica as the demi-goddess, Brunhilde. 

The town is full of musical enthusiasm, and subscriptions 
are coming in handsomely for the new Symphony Society. 
A Dew symphony by Dr. Dvorak is promised for the open- 
ing concert. 

Guilo Minetti, violinist, Roderick Herold, pianist, and 
Miss M. Genevieve Maroney, soprano, will assist Hugo 
Herold in his song recital at Golden Gate Hall Jan. 29th. 



Nowhere can such delightful flowers be obtained all the year 
round as in California. And nowhere in this city can they be bought 
in such profusion and at such low prices as at Leopold's, 39 Post 
street. If you wish a boutonniere or a fine hot-house plant, or if 
yon wish floral decorations for banquets or functions, Leopold will 

""'- your wants. 



St. Denis 



KrrMdwat A ' ItllM 
SI « \OUK 



\ I ROPI \N I'l VS 



Room. Ii.ge prr day and I pwardt. 

In * omteai «n<1 anoMruftirn way there art* f.-« 
o in Hip mrtrjpoii* itian tho 

The gnmi popularity it h*- .: readily 

■ ■ Hki- bi 

WILL1AH TAYLOR & SON. 



Columbia Theatre 



Only one more wpnk. 



The* Gem" Theatre of tho Coast. 
Frledlander. UottlobA, Co., Lessee! 
and Mutineers. 
Commencing Monday, Jauuary S&th. 



DEVIL'S AUCTION. 



Sixty people; im tons oT massive scenery; three fam- 

i dascttng wmiih of resplendent mogniQcenoe; toe 
acme of Bpootaole: tbe perfection o! ulaboi&te 11a play; tiv»- 
grand ballets, entirely new; the Dam-e of the Pools; IDi 
var<i : On Parivi'; the RlallO of tii Queen of uic Ballet; thi- 
foreign specinlties Introducing Tenner & Frobcl. Oe 
Troupe, Lorella D»o. The t^eati lful transformation. ■' The Ad- 
vent of Sprint,' Feb. 1st: The Prodigal Fathhr. 

AL. Hayman & Co., (Incorporated) 

Proprietors. 

Nordic a Popular and 



Baldwin Theatre- 



To-morrow (Sunday) night. Farewell 
Operatic urvr-entral Cuncert 
Engagement limited to two wee-Its. Beginning Monday, Janu- 
ary x5th. The peerless 

MODcJESKA, 

Assisted by the sterling actor Mr. Joseph Hawortr, and a 
thoroughly complete and efficient organization, in a series of 
carefully prepared presen auons. First week, first live nights 
and Saturday matinee. Suderman's great piay. MAGDA. Sat- 
urday night, MAKY STUART. Monday, Feb. 1st: MACBETH. 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rpneUrn . street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Monday, January 25th. Direct from Vienna 

ALGIDE CAPITAINE, 

Europe's most marvelous aerial artiste; Bessie Clayton, "the 
prettiest, daintiest, and most bewitching dancer that ever daz- 
zled an audience ;" tremendous success of the Franz Family; 
binns »fe Binns ; Wilson & Waring; Lieutenant Noble, Sweden's 
greatest ventriloquist; and the Royal Hungarian Court Or- 
chestra. Reserved seats. 25c ; balcony. 10c; opera ohairs and 
box seats 60c. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 
Matinee Prices : Parquet, any Beat, 25o. ; balcony any seat, 10c. ; 
children, 10c, any part. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kreling. 

Proprietor and Manager 



Tivoli Opera house 

Next week, the favorite songful opera, 

MARITANA. 

Jamuuy 30th: Opening night of our great spectacle, ALADDIN, 
or, The Wonderful Lamp. 
Popular Prices 25cand50o 

ST. LAWRENCE 

LIVERY AND 

SALES STABLE. 

W. E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 

423 Post St., between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. 
Telephone No. 1323. 




Established 
1862. 



Tomkinson's Livery Stable 

J. TOMPKIK ON, Proprietor. 

Nos. 57, 59, and dl Minna St.. between First and Second. 

Through to Natoma street, Nos. 64, 66, and 68. One blook Trem the Palace 

Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, oorner Post and 

Stockton streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 153. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. Also rookawayB, buggies, and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rates. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco 1 , Gal. Location 
of works—Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 14th day of January, 1897, an assessment, No. 49, of Ten 
(10) cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold, coin to the Seoretary, at the 
office of the company, room 11, 3tt Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any s took upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
18th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1897, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auotion; and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 1 1th day of March, 
1897, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office; Room 11, 331 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



THERE are black sheep in every flock, there are scrubs 
in every profession, there are unworthy and indecent 
men on every block we travel. The Examiner has had for 
years upon its staff a man in a position of trust who is to- 
day, and has been for years, an object of the dislike and 
contempt of every honest minded journalist in the State. 
We refer to "Andy," now familiarly known as "LoDg 
Green" Lawrence. This persoD, utterly destitute of 
literary ability, a gutter-snipe in the most extreme sense 
of the word, a conspirator and lick-spittle, a petty tyrant 
where tyranny could assume the form of extortion, has, by 
some incomprehensible luck, and for some incomprehensi- 
ble reason, been retained by Mr. Hearst as one of the 
guiding lights of his paper. A light to guide to what, a 
power to control what, an influence to shape what? 
There can be but one reply. The light that 'Long Green" 
Lawrence shows is the lantern that guides to the sewers. 
the power is to tear open the most sacred and cherished 
secrets of families, the influence to help destroy innocent 
men and women by garbling the incidents of their private 
lives, to distort circumstances with which the public have 
absolutely no concern, although the attempt is made to 
excite their morbid interest in this wholesale butchery of 
character. 

* * * 

How long shall men like "Long Green" Lawrence be 
permitted to endure in this community? Shall this hired 
Mn of right and morality place his foul hand, unre- 
restrained, upon those things which decent people demand 
shall be held sacred? He stands alone in the profession as 
a pestilential whelp to whom even the sneaking body- 
guard that surrounds him pay reverence with tongues in 
cheek. Bluff, hearty Tom Williams, the Examiner's busi- 
ness manager, communicates his disgust to his cuspidor 
when 'Long Green" Lawrence crosses the threshold of 
the Market street oflBce. He is despised and hated, but 
still he maintains his position by that inexplicable prompt- 
ing which oftentimes leads men of wealth to employ the 
vilest instruments to carry out their designs. 
» * # 

During all this fellow's career on the Examiner there is 
not a good word to be said about him. His associates 
have been of the lowest, and he has been shunned by the 
gentlemen on his paper, who have persistently sneered at 
his practices, and denounced his vice. That such an in- 
dividual should not alone possess a shadow of authority, 
but that he should be tolerated at all, is an argument in 
favor of the all-enduring patience of this community. We 
are accused of supporting a corrupt and demoralizing 
press, and how can we dare refute the assertion when 
such characters as "Long Green" Lawrence are mentioned 
mrnalists, even though their identification with every 
disreputable job, upon which now and then light is shed, 
is established. If William Hearst is not lost to all sense 
of decency he will retire this ex-peanut butcher to ob- 
scurity, and let him tumble naturally into the meshes of 
the law. 



The artists are combining to make a move in a business 
direction. And it is high time. The painting of pictures 
is a delightful and aesthetic amusement, but one cannot 
live on the odors of the studio, and the stomach is so 
anatomically confined that it only enjoys art by its results. 
Now. the Art Association, while" an excellent institution 
for education in art. and for the support of a few teachers. 
does not put a dime into the pockets of the majority of the 
Brethren of the Brush. It is hard times with the artists, 
for the picture buyer is a melancholy infrequency. Now 
an informal meeting was held at the club a few evenings 
ago, and the plan of a combine outlined. In the firsl 
the chairman, president, director, or whatever his 
title may be of this movement, must not be an artist. The 
necessity for this is evident to all who have had the 1 ntrt\ 



of the studios. In the next place, a sort of monthly draw- 
ing, an Art Union scheme for which a certain number of 
tickets might be issued, the proceeds to be divided among 
the contributing artists. This should also take the form 
of an entertainment, music, songs, short acts, etc., wind- 
ing up with a Spanish supper under the direction of that 
inimitable Castilian chef, Charles Rollo Peters, for whose 
impressions of Monterey scenery a box car is now loading 
at the ancient capital. Properly and harmoniously man- 
aged, a scheme of this nature would give each meritorious 
and industrious artist an assured monthly income, and 
keep the wolf, not only from the door, but in the next 

block. 

* * * 

Quite a clever story is told on one of our last season's 
brides, which caused a great deal of merriment among ber 
circle. This young matron in question, belonging as she 
does to the order of »'" "'» riche, is ever desirous of im- 
pressing upon others her own importance and social stand- 
ing, and considers New York the borne of American aris- 
tocracy. At one of our recent social functions, she met a 
young lady from Washington, who is spending the winter 
on this coast. To the great annoyance of this stranger, 
the madam immediately cultivated her, and insisted when- 
ever they met on presenting her as " her friend Miss D 

from New York." Miss D— — , wishing to put a stop to 
such proceedings, decided upon a way most quiet and 
effectual. The occasion soon presented itself at a very 
large tea given on Van Xess avenue. Our Washington 
friend, on entering the drawing-room, was soon espied by 
our Madame Nouveau Riche, who advanced most gra- 
ciously, exclaiming so all might hear: "Ah! My friend 
Miss D , from New York." 

Imagine the horror depicted on Madame's countenance 
when Miss D replied in a placid and gentle tone: 

"Yes — -from the Bowery /" 

A general titter pervaded the vast assemblage. It is 
superfluous to say that the annoyance was removed. 



Harry Dimond laments the aggressiveness of the new 
woman, whose rampant actions, he believes, are forcing 
the lords of creation into positions of secondary importance. 
Finding it necessary to give some personal instructions at 
the French laundry he patronizes, he sought the ostensi- 
ble proprietor, but was by him referred to madame. 
Dimond speedily found that the woman was unmistakably 
the head of both family and business. He made some 
cynical comment upon this condition, to which the woman 
readily assented. 

" My husband, he not very good for business," she ex- 
plained. "But," she added with a glow of pardonable 
pride, "he is a fine laundress! " 

# ♦ * 

There is no doubt but William Greer Harrison will leave 
California in a few months to make his permanent resi- 
dence in the East. Mr. Harrison will be a loss to the 
literary and artistic life of San Francisco. He has done 
more for poor painters and writers in this city than will 
ever transpire, and by his indomitable energy and encour- 
agement, has set many a weak vessel on its way from 
I stormy to smooth waters. His family will remain in 
Europe for two years, and he will attend to the interests 
of the Thames and Mersey Company in New York or Chi- 
cago. The Bohemian Club will miss him sorely, for he was 
ever foremost in all the big things the elubessaj'ed, and 
was untiring in his efforts to promote them. 

# * * 

A genius ivho lives on Montgomery avenue has done as 
much for his day and generation in his line as Edison. He 
has invented a Welsh rarebit which will not clog. There 
is nothing which provokes keener competition among the 
amateur cooks of the clubs than the comparative excel- 
lence of their rarebit. But this Faraday of the kitchen 
has succeeded in mixing the ingredients into a soluble 
paste, which awi heat, toast and spoon. Even 

Peter Robertson, who lias a larger quantity of Welsh rare- 
bit scalps to his score than any man on earth, will 
acknowledge the quality of this new breed. 

The latest and most elegant things in gent's furnishiDg goods are 
to be had of John W. Carmany. 25 Kearny St. 



January ; j 



SAN PRAM i I,R. 



Honorable P»ul Neumann .■' Honolulu ha 
Europe, and is much impi 
ciscan ever made Boootnlu I - homewfaowas mi 
with that tropical clime than l Paul. 

there has been .. he start, 'inder 



Jmed from 

ran- 

all admin- 



istrations. Hut in tb .vhen Paul tiri-t went to 

the Islands, there were rapid change:, in the mil 
During Premier Gibson's administration. Mr. Nrumann was 
appointed Attorney General, and as such, took a m 
the Cabinet. Now. the uniform of a Cabinet officer in 
Honolulu during the kingdom was extremely elaborate and 
expensive; in fact, a perfect razile-dazzle of gold lace. 
Mr. Neumann sent on to Paris for his ministerial costume. 
The weeks rolled on, and the affairs of the Government 
grew more and more unsettled. Battling winds and un- 
kind ocean currents detaiued the good ship which was 
bearing the ministerial splendor to Honolulu. On the very- 
day the ship was sighted off Diamond Head, a vote of want 
of confidence in the Government was passed, and just as 
Mr. Neumann's sword and uniform was put on the wharf, 
that diplomat surrendered his portfolio. The uniform still 
hangs in Mr. Neumann's closet in Honolulu, a gorgeous 
monument to the splendors of a departed kingdom. 
» # # 
At the Cosmos Club, many of the members with specu- 
lative tendencies indulge in frequent games of poker, and 
every Tuesday evening the game is given such full swing 
that no pretense at discontinuing play is made until day- 
light. One of the weekly all-night devotees is Charlie 
Bandman. The last time be played, be had varying luck, 
at one stage of the game possessing almost all the chips 
on the table, but before the termination of play losing all 
his money on a flush. No phase of the game escapes the 
vigilance of the servants in attendance, and a player's luck 
is quickly communicated from hall to kitchen. When 
Bandman, feeling poor and hungry, concluded it was time 
to go to business on Wednesday, he decided he would first 
have breakfast at the club, and entering the dining room, 
ordered a plate of hot cakes as a solace to his simple appe- 
tite and in keeping with his diminished purse. He tried 
to be philosophical over his losses, but he was hardly pre- 
pared to overhear the waiter paraphrase his order for hot 
cakes at the door: "A stack of whites for Mr. Bandman," 
was the intelligent comentary on the condition of the poker 
player's exchequer. 

* * * 

John Luther, the capitalist, and John Bourne, the 
caller of the stock board, are the Heavenly Twins of the 
Bohemian Club. Those two giddy fellows, both of whom 
have passed the seventy-year notch, have more fun in 
their way than the friskiest kid in the club. Not that 
their way is a quiet, demure way by any means. When 
the Reformer wishes the other John to refresh himself, he 
does not say in a piping treble: "Come, my dear old fel- 
low, and let us take off the chill"; but he gives him a 
thump in the ribs that would stagger a lightweight, and 
sings out in a voice that a boatswain might be proud of. 

"Here, you young fellow, I can see thirst in your eye." 
When Uncle George Bromley joins the group things just 
hum. In fact, it keeps the directors busy restraining 
those young bloods from playing leap-frog in the social 
room. 

THAT President A. W. Foster of the San Francisco and 
North Pacific Railroad would come out the victor in 
his fight against Sidney V. Smith, was to be expected, 
notwithstanding the decision of so eminent a jurist as 
Judge Angelotti of Marin County. This decision has now 
been reversed by the Supreme Court, which held with 
President Foster that Mr. Smith was not a director of the 
railroad. Seeing that the present Directors and Mr. Fos- 
ter all work harmoniously for the company's and the stock- 
holders' interests, good times for all concerned may be 
anticipated. 

Through Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 
The Atlantic and Pacific Kailroad (Santa Fe route) runs daily 
through from Oakland to Chicago first-class drawing room and 
second-class modern upholstered tourist sleeping cars. Lowest rates 
to all points in the United States, Canada, Mexico, or Europe. 
Ticket office. fi44 Market street, opposite Chronicle Building. Tele- 
phone Mniii 1531. 



i M vitality and energy, a good appetite, and per- 
fect health arc obtained and endure by taking 



Peruvian 
Biuers. 





Army and Navy GiuD 



Is the only 



Jolin Partridfje, 

308 California St. 

STATIONER, 
PRINTER, 
AND 
BOOKBINDER. 

Now Is the time to order 
BOOKS tor the New Year. 

Tel. Main 614. 
Printing Department: 
42-44 Sceuart street. 

BRIEFS. 
CATALOGUES, 
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NEWSPAPERS. 

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.WHISKEY 



on the market, every package ol which bears 
an affidavit guaranteeing it to be absolutely 
PURE and over SIX YEARS OLD. 



MtYERFELD, MITCHELL & CO, 

116 FRONT St., San Francisoo, Cal. 



REMOUAL. 



-MACONDRAY & GO. 



Importers Teas, Mattings and Silks. 

Snipping and Commission Merchants. 

Agents North China Insurance Company (Limited), 

Have removed to 

116 California Street, San Francisco, Gal. 

, Wpnt Pl*»n anrt Wnmf»n Should use damiana bit- 
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I edy ; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 333 Mar- 
k et street. San Francisco. (Send lor circular.) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 




(From tin' Sur Yuri- King, September 1 .', 1906) 

THE announcement ten days ago of the greatest dis- 
covery of modern times naturally created profound 
interest, not to say excitement, throughout the civilized 
world. It is matter for congratulation that this marvel- 
lous achievement was made by Americans, or rather by 
an American, as one man alone planned the feat, and to- 
day The King is enabled to give its readers the first pub- 
lished particulars of the methods employed by the wealthy 
and now famous Prof. John B. Fairchild in his most 
brilliant and successful attempt to reach the North Pole. 
At great expense the following special interview with the 
Professor has been cabled us: 

Honninovaao, Norway, September 11, 1906. 

The Discoverer of the North Pole, Prof. J. B. Fairchild, 
of New Haven, Connecticut, FJ. S. A., was found by me 
after some trouble, and the following is a full account of 
my interview wit!, him. As your regular correspondent 
cabled, the Professor was obliged to anchor his steamer, 
the North Pole, in a little fiord, or inlet, a few miles south 
of Hammerfest, and make some slight repairs on her be- 
fore proceeding to the United States. The whaling-vessel 
which spoke the North Pole and brought us the first news 
of the discovery gave such vague directions for finding her 
that I cruised about fruitlessly for three days, and the re- 
presentatives of the other papers probably are still 
angrily peering round the inlets in that quarter. 

Yesterday at dawn, while searching the extreme end of 
our twenty-eighth fiord, we found the North Pole close at 
hand. In seeking a safe harbor for a few days the cap- 
tain had concealed the ship pretty effectually. In half an 
hour I was on board and congratulating Prof. Fairchild 
and his companions, whose names you have already. We 
all went down to the cabin, where I told my business. 

The Professor is a quiet, genial, tall blonde Yankee, 
with large and frank but piercing eyes, and nervous to a 
degree, but thoroughly self-controlled. He looks capable 
of running a college or capturing a crew of pirates. 

It had not escaped me that the North Pole was a large 
but, so far as I could see, very ordinary-looking steamer, 
of 2,000 or 3,000 tons. I noticed, however, that she 
seemed to be iron-clad, but saw nothing remarkable in 
that fact. In answer to my many questions the Professor 
or his able associates spoke as follows: 

" No, we did not find an open Polar Sea, as some men 
have rather foolishly insisted would be the case: the path 
to the Pole is through hundreds of miles of solid ice. 
Neither did we leave the ship and travel over the ice, 
This ship you are on at this moment, my friend, steamed 
through the ice and remained for five days and five nights 
directly over that point at the northern extremity of the 
earth commonly called its axis, or the North Pole. Your 
eyes open! Well, there are 14 other men on board be- 
sides the crew of 43, who can bear witness to the fact as 
well as I, but before you leave us we will demonstrate the 
statement to be a scientific possibility." He paused, then 
added, "And if you don't admit it we will take you up 
there and leave you there." 

I gazed half-incredulously at the other gentlemen. They 
nodded solemnly, or smiled superiorly, and one of them un- 
locked a drawer in a cabinet and took out a tiny bottle of 
water, which lay with many others on cotton-batting. 
Putting it in my hand he remarked quietly, "North Pole 
water, lately ice. Keep it." While thanking him I 
mentally resolved to be very meek and mild, in face of the 
Professor's awful threat. He continued: 

" The many attempts to reach the Pole in the regula- 
tion manner by travelling over the ice and establishing 
supply stations or making caclu along the route, long ago 
I felt to be folly and almost crime. The cold weather, the 
distance, the amount of supplies to be taken, uncertainties 



j- — By (5/ia.r/es P Ji/gftiefon 

connected with the ice,— all these and other things pre- 
cluded, to my mind, the bare possibility of ever reaching 
the Pole in that way. To travel to it through the air 
seemed for a time more feasible, but when the three balloon 
attempts we all know about had for one reason or another 
failed utterly, it seemed folly to try again in that way. 

" About the time the first balloon attempt was made, in 
1896, 1 determined to deliberately think out an original 
plan by which I could succeed. Five years ago the right 
idea came to me. I gave four years and a half to the 
work of preparation, and selection of my comrades, all of 
whom were pledged to secrecy, and on June 1st of this 
year we cleared from New York City. 

"My idea?" The Professor smiled broadly, and then 
burst into a laugh. 

"Why, man, it is simplicity itself! The only wonder is 
that no man had thought of it before. To put all in a sen- 
tence, I had a steamer built to order after my own plans, 
plated her with three-inch steel on the outside up to with- 
in three feet of the rail, or taffrail, as it is sometimes 
called, placed within her a powerful engiue and electric 
dynamo combined, and then conveyed the electricity to the 
steel plate on the outside of the vessel. The immensely 
powerful current we were able to generate simply melted the 
ice we wanted to pass through, and that's all there is toit." 

I gasped in amazement. In theory, the idea seemed as 
though it might be perfect. In practice — well, they said 
it had worked, so there was nothing for me to say. But 
that was not by any means "all there was to it," as he 
modestly expressed it, and in reply to further questions 
the Professor went on, speaking first of his vessel. 

"My steamer is 240 feet long, of 2,300 tons register, and 
is fitted out with engines 3,000 horse-power, slightly mod- 
ified to meet the peculiarities of the fuel we used. I should 
say also that the outside steel plate conducting the 
electricity is six inches from the frame of the vessel, the 
space between being packed with asbestos. 

" You are right: a most powerful current of the so- 
called fluid, electricity, was necessary in order to melt the 
thick ice sufficiently rapidly for us to make any headway. 
I will not go into details about the engine-dynamo further 
than to say it is what is called a vertical quadruple ex- 
pansion engine, marine type, of 2.500 H. P.,— actual, not 
nominal, — and carries a pair of 800 kilo-watt dynamos 
supplying together about 13,000 amperes; its dimensions 
are 26x18 feet by 25 feet high. I can assure you it is a 
magnificent piece of machinery. You must take a look at 
it before you leave us. 

" No, it is never the custom to have the dynamo run by 
the same engines that propel the ship, for various reasons, 
chief of which is that it would be difficult to properly 
operate the dynamo when it was desired to do so without 
at the same time running the vessel. 

" In planning our course we followed very nearly in the 
track of the Greely Expedition, of 1882; Lieut. Lockwood, 
of that party, on May X.\, 1882, reached latitude 83° 24/, 
or a point distant from the Pole 396 geographical miles, 
equal to 458 statute miles. Twice since then have men 
approached closer to the Pole: the whaling vessel Newport 
in 1893, and Prof. Nansen and party in 1896. But we ig- 
nored their routes altogether. 

" Professor Greely and his party travelled for many 
miles over the ice. We encountered ice about 60 statute 
miles south of the extremest northern point he reached, 
making it necessary for us to traverse over 500 miles of 
solid ice. As our speed averaged nearly one mile per 
hour — pretty fair travelling, too, under the circumstances! 
—it took us five days of twenty four hours to come to the 
jumping off point. On the way back we have taken it slower. 

"We found no open water to speak of and but little thin 
or broken ice; it was one nearly level field of solid 
glistening ice, the glare from which of course compelled 



January 23, 1897. 



PAN" FRANCISCO KBWS I.i: i 



1 1 



us to wear very daiv Much if not most of the 

time there was Ice I go « r wore on - 

in an ever-shifl ..x>n of w.r 

ingone foot or - , R . ot |, the 

i no energy in cutting a wide swath. 

" Did the electricity not affect the 00 
shouldit.' It is only magnet which makes thl 

■ deviate, though if that instrument were held near ■ 
dynamo or very close to n live wire it would doubtli 
deranged temporarily. Hut our compa-s scared us once, 
for a few moments' Because it alwavs i>oints north. 
what would you expect it to do on reaching the extremes) 
northern point of our sphen We our instrument 
seemed drunk, or bewildered, until Dr. Goodman stood it 
on its head, so 10 speak, when all was serene again. 
There's a problem for us to so 

" The cold was something terrible, awful, unspeakable. 
It was simply beyond words. For days our spirit-ther- 
mometres registered — or did not vary 'more than two de- 
grees from— 112 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. But cold 
weather we had come prepared for, and I am glad to say 
that not one of our party of 58 was severely frozen in any 
part. So much for having given months of thought to 
preparing for every contingency. 

" We lost one man by accident, it is true, but that oc- 
curred through his own carelessness. You must know 
that Polar bears— large, white, beautiful— sometimes 
came very near the ship. Desiring to take back with us 
a few of their magnificent skins, we one day took a hun- 
dred yards of heavily-insulated wire, exposed a foot of one 
end, attached the other to the dynamo and sallied forth. 
While some of us were permitting a bear to chew the live 
end, which he did for about one second, one of the crew 
stole up behind the animal and put his hand on him before 
bis intention occurred to us, or before we could jerk away 
the wire. Well, that's all! I should say that while we 
have intelligent men for a crew, every man had been im- 
pressively and repeatedly warned not to run the slighest 
risk whatsoever of drawing a charge of the terrific amount 
of electricity on board. Even we ourselves, experienced 
scientists, kept a look-out for one another and took no 
offence at a word of caution. Of course the wire that 
caused the man's death could convey but a small part of 
the 400,000 volts generated by the dynamo, but still it 
was a fearful charge and it did its work in a moment. 

11 A possible source of peril and the one I had feared al- 
most above all others was the crashing down on our ship 
of some overtowering iceberg. I feared that in making 
our way through the enormously thick ice and among the 
ill-shapen mountains of it we must expect to encounter, 
we might undermine or in some way precipitate upon us a 
mass capable a thousand times over of burying us out of 
sight. But we encountered few icebergs except at the 
shore, so to speak. Moreover, we discovered something 
which astonished us and relieved us from all fear on that 
score, something which only experience could have even 
suggested. This is that as the ship left the open water 
and gradually betran to force her way through the ice she 
was raised by the water she had melted above the level of 
the sea, until we sailed over and through the plateau of 
ice as we would through any other sea. This process was 
gradual, but the very fact that we were surrounded by 
only a little water, which froze again instantly as we went 
on. aided us much, if indeed it does not account lor the ex- 
perience. To express it in other words, at times the ship 
simply travelled up-hill and down, although of course at a 
very slight angle only. Still, we got there! We did not 
have specially smooth sailing, but we managed to travel on 
and we avoided colliding with any suspicious iceberg. 

" When did we reach the Pole? On July 28th. The next 
party that goes up there will find a veritable pole of heavy 
wood. At the foot of it we left a stout box containing 
certain papers, a box securely sealed and anchored. By 
the way, we surmounted that pole with a plate of thin 
steel bearing on one side a painted United States flag, and 
on the other the motto, 'Keep of the grass.' " 

The Professor rose to indicate that the interview was 
over. I asked him about the more scientific results of his 
great discovery, but he said good-humoredly that he and 
his compeers must have more time in which to calculate 
and study before publishing them. Probably, also, they 



things to the 
thoir OWI 

and such an inn • thai I urged thi 

to explain it . '; 

dynamo. I km 1 ,„,( bave 

carried coal aoj »r sufficient for 

such a purpose, and without a groat deal 1 if tuelofsomi 

U»ey enter on the taskofpenetra 

ting the icy and unl regions of the Arctic I 

"No, we did 1 aid the Professor. "When 

the leading idea of the win came tome, that of 

melting a path for the ship with electricity, it doubli 
more than doubled the problem of supplying fuel for the 
engines. Then 1 sot my wits to work in earnest. We 
could not use coal, oral least not in its ordinary form, as an 
easy calculation showed that for an eight months supply for 
I the engines I purpose,] using 1 would have to carry 12,000 or 
13,000 tons, an utter impossibility. I proposed running no 
risk of being caught empty-handed far from a coaling 
station. 

" Now the loss of power from any engine using coal is 
great, amounting usually to 85 per cent. Even such 
engines as I should take," the very finest triple or quad- 
ruple expansion, on land or sea utilize not more than 2.1 
per cent at the most, involving the loss of fully three 
quarters of the coal. This is a tremendous fact, but is 
well known to all engineers. It is true that the loss would 
be the same in portion no matter what was fed to the 
engines, but the point was that coal was too heavy and 
too bulky anyway. When both engines were running, our 
steamer would have demanded three or four tons per hour. 
To bring supply-vessels was totally out of the question. 

" Inveutors have applied themselves diligently to devis- 
ing methods by which this loss of power might be saved, 
and these methods I investigated carefully. For one rea- 
son or another none of them satisfied me. I experimented 
myself a good deal, and not caring to give years to its 
study, 1 turned my thoughts into another channel. 

"The greatest heat-producing article in nature is 
hydrogen gas. The calorific power of one pound of 
hydrogen burned under favorable conditions is sufficient to 
raise over 34,000 pounds of water from zero centigrade to 
one degree centigrade, or nearly the same as from 32 
Fahrenheit to 34 F. In other words, and comparing it with 
coal, one pound of which yields about 8,000 thermal units, 
we know that one pound of hydrogen gas yields over 34,- 
000 thermal units, or over four and one quarter times as 
much power as coal. Hydrogen gas I must certainly use. 
"Now of all the four processes by which we chemists ob- 
tain that gas, not one yields it in an absolutely pure con- 
dition. I might have passed this point, however, but the 
best method chemists have so far used was inadequate to 
furnish more than an infinitesimal fraction of the vast 
amount necessary to propel the ship and run the dynamo. 
In short, I applied myself to the task of discovering a pro- 
cess by which I could obtain my gas from the compound 
always used — water — easily enough and in quantities 
sufficient for every purpose. 

"I succeeded. Our motive power for both engines, 
therefore, has been drawn daily from the very water we 
passed through. We brought a little coal, about 3,000 
tons, for use in emergencies, but have noL touched it. 
Hydrogen gas is the calorific power which has enabled us 
to go to the North Pole. When we reach New Haven 
again I shall have the discovery of my process for obtain- 
ing that gas, also, to give to the world, and I think that 
in the near future hydrogen will take the place of coal in 
all large ships, manufacturies, etc." 

The interview was over. Before leaving, the engineer- 
in-chief showed me the interior workings of the ship, and 
explained certain points of great interest, such as the 
Professor's method of extracting hydrogen from the water, 
but this cablegram is already sufficiently lengthy. 

The accident to the steamer will delay the party a few 
days only. They will then proceed at once to the United 
States, there to enjoy the fruits of Professor Fairchild's 
remarkable achievement, fruits which all the civilized 
nations of the globe will undoubtedly hasten to bestow on 
him, the more especially as his expedition did not need the 
usual rescuing. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



Nfi 



A Book Mr. A. T. i^iriller-Couch's "Adventures in 
of Criticism," a collection of papers from The 

the Week.* Speaker I London i, first attracted our at- 
tention as being written by one of the most 
brilliant of the younger Oxford writers, and next as being 
dedicated to an old Oxford friend. The well-printed vol 
ume contains nearly forty short essays on various literary 
topics. Some interesting remarks are found in the essay 
entitled "The Attitude of the Public Towards Letters," in 
which Mr. Quiller-Couch clearly points out the popular 
fallacy that the great Brain of the Public is the supreme 
judge of literature. Though, of course, it rests ultimately 
with the Public to buy, or refuse to buy, an author's 
works, immense popular success is a very poor and inad- 
equate tost of the merit of a writer. The general public. 
so far from being (as men who ought to know better 
sometimes tell it) an infallible judge of good literature, is 
not even a competent one. It is- absurd to suppose that 
the man in the street forms a truer estimate of a book 
than the man of culture. The public, in so far as it enter- 
tains right views at all about books, derives them from 
that aristocracy of taste and intelligence which is 110- 
wheii Imerous body. The average parson, the 

average professional man, the average commercial man, 
knows little or nothing of literary matters. Some books 
they can read, and many others they cannot, and there's 
an end to it. It is the cultured few who gradually impose 
their views on the many, and the general public is the 
ultimate judge only in the sense that it is the last to be 
convinced. Take a writer of such great popularity as the 
late R. L. Stevenson. Who first found him out'.' Were 
not men of taste twenty years ago reading "An Inland 
Voyage " with delight, and feeling that a new star had 
arisen in the literary firmament. And how many years 
ago is it since " Donkey Rides in the Cevennes " or " Mem- 
ories and Portraits" were discovered by the great public? 
How few, comparatively, of the many-headed Demus have 
even yet found them.' In "A Case of Book-stall Censor- 
ship " Mr. < >uiller-Couch comments amusingly on Messrs. 
Eason & Son, a firm of booksellers who enjoy a monopoly 
of the bookstalls at the railway stations of Ireland, similar 
to that enjoyed by W. H. Smith A Son, at the railway 
stations of Great Britain. Messrs. Eason & Son refused 
it Allen's " Woman Who Did " at any railway 
station in Ireland, considering that its tendency was to- 
wards immorality. While this conduct was unquestionably 
honest, it was erroneous, because it is not as literary 
critics and judges of what may. and what may not, be 
read that Messrs. Eason are doing business; their business 
is to supply such books as their customers ask for. A 
censorship of literature may be a good thing, but let its 
functions be exercised by a man chosen for his literary 
knowledge, and not by a book-vender, however honest and 
successful, other papers deal with Henry Kingsley (the 
brother of Charles), Charles Reade, Robert Louis Steven- 
son, Hall Caine, Anthony Hope Hawkins, Frank R. Stock- 
ton, "Trilbv." etc. Mr. A. T. Ouiller-Couch has an instinct- 
ive dislike 1 in which we heartily join him) of stories into 
which hypnotism and other pseudo-scientilic isms are in- 
troduced, and asserts that Mr. du Maurier's "Trilby" 
won its immense popularity not because of, but in spite of, 
the hypnotism contained in it. He goes on to say that 
"Trilby" consists of two incompatible parts, one natural 
and the other supernatural, and that it is only the charm 
of the natural portion of the tale that carries the rest 
along; the hypnotic and scoundrelly machinations of Sven- 
gali being redeemed by the dramatic adventures of Trilby, 
Little Billee, Taffy, and the Laird, who win a warm place 
in all hearts. 

•This story was awarded the third prize in a competi- 
tion arranged by the Chicago Record. The title is a not 
very ingenious adaptation "of the title of the well-known 
romance by Ouida, " l'nder Two Flags." The three na- 
tional emblems are the Ameri?an, the Cuban, and the 



Spanish. We find here the murderer, the shrewd detec- 
tive, the superlatively beautiful and equally unprincipled 
woman, and the mysterious, dark, sombre, self-contained, 
invincible man, that are found in all such stories. The 
story is a story, and nothing more; it has not a trace of 
literary quality; there is no attempt at characterization; 
all the men and women speak alike ; that is, just as the 
New York newspaper-man, who is a leading feature of the 
story, and his confrere* speak. There are adventures, 
hairVbreadth escapes, and complications of all kinds, spun 
out somewhat interminably. Yet, to our thinking, the 
story, poor as it is, is better than the bemuddled tale to 
which the first prize in this queer contest was awarded; 
we have managed to read "Under Three Flags" through; 
the story which won the highest award beat us entirely; 
to borrow a phrase from the race-track, we could not last 
the distance. 

*■• l'nder Three Flags: A Story of Mystery," by B. L. Taylor nn.l 
A. T. Tboits. Published by Rand, McNally & Co., Chicago and New- 
York. 1896. 

George W. Cable, the well-known writer, edits a monthly 
literary magazine, entitled "The Symposium." It is pub- 
lished at Northampton, Mass., is of moderate bulk, but 
printed on good paper, and has good pictures. In the 
December issue, Clifton Johnson, who displays great taste 
and skill in the illustration of books by photographs, has 
an article on "The Land of Lorna Doon," with four illus- 
trations from his own photographs. An article by Mr. 
Cable on J. M. Barrie is adorned with a portrait of Mrs. 
Barrie. The magazine contains several stories and poems, 
and five departments, the latter under the titles of 
"Thoughts and Views," "In the Foreground," "Home 
and Neighbor," "In the Reading World," and "Tail- 
pieces." The periodical advocates the formation of Home- 
Culture clubs, and offers many advantages to those who 
desire to borrow books from the circulating library con- 
nected with the magazine. Though we think that "home 
culture" should mean the. cultivation of homes, just as 
horticulture means the cultivation of gardens, or piscicul- 
ture the breeding of fish, yet we are willing to suppose 
that it is intended to mean the cultivation of the minds of 
the various members of the family. 

"A Great Hotel," which appears in the February Scrib- 
uer's as the second article on "The Conduct of Great 
Businesses," gives some astounding facts as to this modern 
development of one of the oldest businesses in the world. 
There are as many employees in a great hotel as there are 
guests; there is a man whose whole duty it is to wind 
clocks; one head waiter in a great hotel owns a yacht and 
a summer residence; and hotels have their private black- 
smith and paint shops. C. D. Gibson's great series of 
London pictures, which begin to appear in this number, is 
accompanied with his own notes and impressions, which 
show him to be a bright, crisp, and observant writer. The 
pictures present entirely new types from London streets. 

On Tuesday evening. January 12th, Mr, J. W. Laing, 
M. A., of Oxford, and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical 
Society, delivered a lecture at L T nion Square Hall on his 
recent explorations in Vancouver Island, illustrated by 
many fine photographs. The Rev. W. W. Bolton gave an 
amusing narrative of his experiences on the same trip. 
The lecture was before the Geographical Society of the 
Pacific, and was very well attended. Next evening, at 
Pioneers' Hall, Mr. Laing delivered a lecture, illustrated 
with fine stereopticon views, on India, where he was for- 
merly Head Master of the college founded by Lord Mayo 
for the education of the sons of the Maharajahs. This was 
well received by the large audience. 

Professor Howison of the State University's recent ad- 
dress before the California Teachers' Association in San 
Jose, on "Interest and Character as Educational 
Motives," will be published in pamphlet form by William 
Doxey; as also will the report, by Dr. Harris, the United 
States Commissioner of Education, and Professor Howison, 
of a discussion on the rational interpretation of Christian- 
ity, at the conference of Presbyterian ministers held on 
December 21st of last year. At Easter, Mr. Doxey will 
issue a collection of the poems of Clareuce F. Urmy, a 
Californian whose verse has won much favor with magazine 
editors. 



January 23, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR 



•3 



Id the Christmas issue of the 1 tankman 
ment is made in a notr upon too \V. Ml 

ti Nature ami Culture It i- to this • 
'"The volume of the work 
that instead of the original I* - we have now 

twenty-four in the final shape which the book has taken.'' 
The writer of this may be a fair literary critic, but he is 
certainly a weak arithmetician Twelve increased one- 
half is eiifhleen; twelve raised to twenty-four is doubled; 
a book which originally contained twelve essays, but now 
contains twenty-four, has in it twice as much matter as it 
originally had; in other words, it is as large again as it 
was before. We should like to propound to the Bookman's 
man the old problem: If a herring-and-a half cost a cent 
and-a-half. what is the price per dozen? If be mastered 
that, we would then try him with this: If a hen-and-a-half 
lay an ogg-and-a-half in a day and-a-half, how many eggs 
will six hers lay in seven days? We should be willing to 
lay two to one on the problem. 

The Academy, one of London's most serious literary 
periodieals. has lately adopted a novel manner of review- 
ing books for boys. The Bookman gives the following ex- 
ample of the new school of criticism: " ' Harold the Norse- 
man' is simply a ripping story about Harold Haardraada. 
King of Norway, who was bowled out at last by the other 
Harold at the Batt'e of Stamford Bridge with Tostig, who 
was a bit of a bounder. The story is just as good as his- 
tory, because the writer has taken it from the old poet 
Johnnies. This book tells you all about the Vikings, how 
they lived, and hunted, and fougrht; and you feel that it is 
all real, because the writer has takeD it all from the chaps 
who saw it done." This, while decidedly entertaining, is 
scarcely in conformity with one's preconceived ideas of so 
learned a weekly as the Academy. 

A. Schilling & Co. have issued a neat little book of 
twenty-eight pages, with the seductive title, "Money- 
making." Therein they offer many suggestions to those 
who would make money by advertising, setting forth what 
good advertising is, and what it is not. "Advertising is 
not antics; not mere show of signs; not dirt; not a lot of 
vulgar and unpleasant things. It is what you like to see 
in other stores." Frankness, honesty, courtesy, and several 
other good, old-fashioned, but (we had feared) rather out- 
of-date virtues are recommended to him who would re- 
tail successfully; and samples of the signs prepared by 
Messrs. Schilling for use by grocers are given, to aid them 
in selecting those best suited to the requirements of their 
business. 

PICTURESQUE SAN FRANCISCO. 

ONE of the most picturesque sights of the city is the 
old fort at Fort Point, which formerly guarded the 
entrance to the harbor, from the Golden Gate. The fort, 
although still in fair repair, is no longer used for defensive 
purposes, as more modern fortifications have been con- 
structed in the immediate vicinity. 



THE determination of Mr. Amad6e Joullin to devote 
much of his time and attention to Indian studies is 
most praiseworthy, and will give that artist a larger field 
wherein to display his capabilities. A canvass just com- 
pleted, called "Gone," is the first of this new series, and 
shows that he can treat such studies with the same 
breadth and felicity he puts in his landscape work. We 
shall look forward to his future work with pleasure, know- 
ing that it will in no wise fall short of our expectations. 

ST the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring 
Valley Water Works Company, the following direct- 
ors, all members of the old board, were re-elected : Charles 
Webb Howard, A. H. Payson, G. "W. Beaver, S. C. Bige- 
low, Charles R. Bishop, A. Borel, H. S. King. The re- 
ports submitted were most satisfactory, and show the 
affairs of the company to be in most excellent condition. 

A Sovereign Remedy. 
DR PARKER'S COUGH CURE. One dose will stop a cough. It never 
falls. Try it. Price 25c. George Dahlbender & Co , 214 Kearny street 

Ten Pbbss Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. P. reads all 
papers on the Paoiflo Coast, and supplies dippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 




Gray Bros., 



316 Montgomery Street, S. F. 

No. 205 New High St., Los Angeles. 



Concrete Artificial 
Stone Work. 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and 
Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

Sohillinger's Patent ] In all Its branches 

Side Walk and Garden Walk a specialty.' 

Office: 307 Montgomery street, (Nevada block) San Franclsoc 



INDIA OPIUfl CURE, 



Room 1. Columbian Building, 
916 Market Street, S. F. 



B. D Kimmis, Proprietor. 

OPIUM, MORPHINE and COCAINE 

And all other opiate habits cured speedily and effectively or money re- 
funded. Ladies treated privately at home. 



5RUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories, 
stable men, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc. 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 



COKE—Cheapest Fuel! 



REDUCTION in Prioe. 
Wholesale (50 bbls. or more,) EIGHTY 
Cents per bbl. Retail (any quantity 
under 50 bbls.), NINETY Cents per 
bbl. At the works of the 



San Francisco Gaslight Co. 

Howard and First Streets. 



Foot of Second Street 



You Must Look Neat. 



Suits Cleaned 
and Pressed 



$1.00 



Bau Gitu Clothing Renovatoru, 

Suits called for and delivered. 



22V4 Geary St., Easterbrook B'ld'g, 
RoomB 19-20-21. 'Phone Grant 158. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




January 23, 1897. 



A Fifth Wheel 
To a Coach. 



The many who hold the so-called Min- 
ing Bureau in disfavor as a parasiti- 
cal outgrowth on the body politic, and 
a machine run in the interests of a clique, 
could adduce no better argument for its abolishment than 
the recent report which, in regard to practical utility, 
would be more aptly entitled a Mining Directory. It 
marks the latest a 1 1' 1 most pronounced stage of degeneracy 
in an institution which is now little more than a free adver- 
tising agency for the makers and inventors of mining 
machinery; of processes for the manipulation of ores, and 
personal friends of the powers that be. To appreciate 
the merits of this literary effort, evolved at the expense of 
sii.'i.uiin of public money, the reader will require a library 
of back volumes at hand for reference. The books and ac- 
lution of mining data should be turned over to the 
State University as a nucleus for a School of Mines, which 
would reflect some credit upon the community at least, 
and make some return for the money expended in its sup- 
port. The museum, too, could be placed to much better 
advantage cither in the Park or with the Academy of 
Sciences, which can boast of one equally as interesting, if 
not more so. The fact that the most prominent mine 
owners of the State refused to grant admission to repre- 
sentatives of the Bureau is noted, and perhaps may furn- 
ish its supporters with ammunition for a battle in behalf 
of the official recommendation that Czar-like powers be 
given the institution by adding mining inspectorship to 
the duties of State Mineralogist. What the Legislature 
ought to do, provided it does not wipe the Bureau out of 
nee, is to make it imperative that whoever is se- 
lected to fill the position of chief of the Bureau should 
possess a scientific us well as a practical training in the 
profession, and furthermore, that he should devote his sole 
time to the duties for which he is paid. Men engaged in 
operating mines of their own, and in other enterprises 
which take up their time, have no business at the head of 
a public department, and it should not be permitted. 

Failing the individual possessed of the 
wealth necessary to purchase their 
wares at inflated prices, the scheming 
purveyors for mining markets abroad 
have adopted a new and simpler method to fill their 
pockets. The public purse is now sought. Legitimate 
mining investments, on a moderate scale of profits in the 
way of a commission on sales, do not suit these manipula- 
tors, a grade or two removed in the social scale above the 
itinerant "pea and thimble" expert and "sure-thing' 
fakirs. They are on the look-out for some old shell with a 
record, which can be burnished up to pass examination 
from some purchasable scoundrel labeled mining engi- 
neer, bogus like the rest of the outfit. Equipped with a 
mine (?) of this description, the next step is to bring a 
company out in London or elsewhere with high-sounding 
name, prospectus full of glittering certainties in the way 
of profit on the investment, and a "guinea-pig" directory. 
Men who see through the rascally scheme, with power to 
stop it in the initial stages, are too venal or cowardly to 
interfere, and the game is played, the manipulators clean- 
ing up their ill-gotten gain before the collapse comes. In 
the case of California properties, as a rule, the mine owner 
cannot be held responsible. He rarely receives what his 
mine is worth. Its value is gauged very closely, with no 
allowances made in dealing with him. The juggling is done 
at the other end, where toe profit is turned, should the 
scaly transaction succeed, to be shared in by confederates 
who assisted here. That the latter-day type of Sir Mul- 
berry Hawke does not always get off scot free is evident 
from the investigation now g in London over a 

scheme of the kind, which is likely to end in the con- 
of one or more of the Directors. It has already bei 
veloped that tbe real vendor or promoter had used 
tious names in application for shares, and had bought 
shares in the market in the names of other people to keep 
up the price. One of the Directors also admitted that an 
understanding existed between himself and the promoter, 



Rigging the 
Foreign Market. 



who was largely indebted to him, that tbe latter should 
give him half the profits when the company came out. 
This is a fair sample of what is going on, to the ultimate 
detriment of the business. It is some satisfaction to know, 
however, that money is not pouring in from the public so 
freely as these robbers might desire, and absolute failure 
has attended not a few of their schemes. 

The disaster which has overtaken the 
A Deplorable Thistle Mining Company by the flooding 
Mining Mishap, of its mines in Plumas, is a very regret- 
able affair. Without the slightest warn- 
ing the water broke in, while driving one of the gangways 
up stream without the slightest appearance of moisture in 
the gravel, not even affording time to ascertain whether 
its source was from the gravel or bed rock. If from the 
former the pumps will, it is believed, eventually drain the 
mine, but if from the latter, the only salvation for the com- 
pany lies in a tunnel, which will take a long time and much 
money. Otherwise the mine will have to be abandoned. 
The company was never doing better than when the water 
broke in and stopped work. The mine, which has been in 
operation for four years past, in charge of Mr. C. B. Win- 
gate, was a credit to its management, and one which could 
be pointed out as a representative and successful invest- 
ment of British capital in California. It is hoped that the 
water will eventually be mastered and work resumed on 
the property. 

The bear brokers and "chipping" fra- 
The pine-Street ternity on Pine street were treated to 
Market. a surprise during the week, in the form 

of an upheaval in prices, which sent 
Chollar up to $1 40, the other north-end and middle shares 
showing a proportionate advance. Unfortunately, the 
movement was short-lived, and some of the stocks dropped 
suddenly back to the starting point almost faster than 
tbey went up. Subsequently, a streak of high-grade ore, 
cut on the 1550 level of Con. -Cal. -Virginia, helped to stiffen 
matters up and enthuse dealers to the point of increasing 
their holdings. When the Nevada Legislature meets, it is 
expected that it will assist the American Flat drainage 
scheme to some extent, and then the temper of local in- 
vestors will be tested in the matter of support. If they 
take kindly to the scheme, some lively times may be ex- 
pected on the street. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. 's annual report, 
Production of compiled by President J. .1. Valentine, 
Precious Metals, of precious metals produced in the 
States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia) during 1896, 
shows in the aggregate: Gold, $54,399,242; silver, $35,- 
784,963; copper, 128,869,305; lead, $7,236,026. Total 
gross result, $126,289,536. The "commercial" value at 
which the several metals named herein have been estimated 
is: Silver, 67c. peroz. ; copper, lie. per lb., and lead, $3 per 
cwt. The production by States was as follows: California, 
115,631,391; Nevada. $2,759,364; Montana, $37,270,500; 
Utah, $10,383,759; Colorado, $26,854,844; Arizona, $9,- 
265,917; Idaho, $8,125,182; Dakota, $4,794,765; Alaska, 
$2,750,955. The other amounts are small. The exports 
of silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, 
etc., have been as follows': From London, *33,!ti;s,62i); from 
San Francisco, $9,947,776. Total, $43,916,396, as against 
$43,956,787 last year. Pounds sterling estimated at $4.84. 
The annual meeting of the Fire- 
The Fireman's Fund man's Fund Insurance Company 
Election. was held on Tuesday last. In spite 

of the hard times which have borne 
so hardly on other companies, the company made a re- 
markably good financial showing, the net surplus being 
swelled to $1,104,726. against $987,205 for the preceding 
year. The old Board of Directors was re-elected, as fol- 
lows : D. J. Staples, John O. Earl, John Barton, John H. 
Gardiner, John T. Wright. Thomas S. Chard, VV. H. Brown, 
F. \V. Lougee, J. C. Coleman, John Bermingham, and Wil- 
liam J. Dutton. The officers remain the same as last year. 
The Giant shares were carried up to $30 
The Deal during the week, but whether the good 
In Powder, folks with money to throw to the birds got 
trapped, it is difficult to say. The compact 
which is supposed to affect these debt-laden shares to a 
greater extent than those in great solid concerns like the 
California, is still conspicuous by its absence. 



January 23, 1897 




IK AN 



IS 



•Hc»r the Crier:" "Wo»l ihedarll art iboul" 
'Onethat wlllpl»TlhcJcvll.ilr,wltb jou." 



O AKL A N D must be a matrimonial harvest Hold for 
dames and ancient spinsters. Two frisky bridegrooms 
over there have this week taken unto tbemsi 
older than themselves, ami as their own ages in the mar 
riage licenses are given as sixty-nine ami seventy-four re- 
spectively, it will be seen that youthfjlness is at .. 
count with Cupid across the hay. The Town Cm Kit pre- 
dicts that within a months time there will not be an old 
maid or elderly widow in the city limits in San Fran 
Ten cents will take them to Oakland, and while there's 
life there's hope. 

YANKING molars from the jaws of howling patients is 
splendid exercise for knights of the forceps, and it 
would seem that any dentist with a fairly good practice 
could keep bis muscles in proper trim without joining an 
athletic club. In a new organization of this character that 
has just riled its articles of incorporation, a local nerve- 
killer has been made a prominent officer, and it is now 
whispered that he intends to become a sort of dental San- 
dow, who will be able to pick up his patients and shake 
them off a tooth, instead of extracting the latter in the 
old-fashioned way. 

WHETHER Miss Lillian Ashley will hide her attractive 
limbs in a convent or will advertise them before the 
footlights, remains to be seen. It is, of course, hard to 
believe that she was damaged to the extent of 8100,000, 
but she probably knew best what value to put upon her 
earthly charms. 

IT appears that the unfortunate souls who shuffle oft this 
mortal coil via the Morgue route, and hope by dying 
unidentified to secure peace at last, without putting their 
relatives and friends to the inconvenience of burying them, 
are to be denied even the poor privilege of interment in 
the Potter's Field. The doctors want them to experiment 
on, so, instead of being decently planted, these hapless 
bodies must meet a pickled fate, in the interests of science. 
This is enough to make a man prefer the uncertainties of 
life to the certainties of unidentified dissolution. 

FISTICUFFS, 'sdeath, divorce; 
A murderer on the wirJg; 
A Morgue that prays that another corse 

Each hour its way may bring; 
Ballets and knives and thieves; 

Bloodshed and birds of Drey — 
These are what San Francisco weaves 
In her story of a day. 

VIGOROUS and effective methods are being employed 
to stamp out crime in Alaska, and that territory is 
now a law-abiding and peaceable place. These frontier 
localities, supposed to be the hot-beds of criminal lawless- 
ness, can teach San Francisco a thing or two in decency 
and self-respect. The secret of the matter is, that Alaska 
has not become too highly civilized to be respectable. 

MARY and Thomas Finnegan, both deaf mutes, are 
trying to get divorced, and Judge Troutt has been 
sitting up nights trying to master the intricacies of the 
sign language. It appears that the Finnegans, according 
to their own testimony, fight continually, but their neigh- 
bors assert that they have never heard them speak a 
cross word. 

EX-SENATOR Grady of Fresno is in hot water. He is 
accused of battering a waiter, and putting the final 
touches to the exercise bv chewing his ear. The Town 
Ceier is not surprised that a Fresno man should be vio- 
lent and bloodthirsty when at large, but cannot forbear 
expressing astonishment at his singular taste. 

THE Truckee carnival has enabled some scores of San 
Franciscans to taste of the "delights" of the "good, 
old-fashioned winter;" such joys as thousands of Eastern 
psople come to California to avoid. 

THE Examiner's man Friday is at present running the 
Santa Cruz Penny Press; into the ground, presumably. 



M I 1*1)1 M dooi 

I 1 

: prnmiiu 
men, . ; . t „k,.„ ,,f „„ r , 

relation I 

k t men of his eali 1 

form. . reading for him. ai 

lngh< '.iii-re. aught Induce him to come 

-vith ns in the near future. 

A GOOD plahndtOM Oakland coogre 

Sunday thai the earthquake shock which dis- 
turbed the worshipers was "simply the voice of the Lord 
i'h i- pious Interpretation of the 
occurrence is rendered somewhat doubtful from the cir 
cumstance thai the aame jolt w;i s experienced in the 

Examiner Office The stair of that establishment is so ac- 
iraed to 'shake-ups" that the event was scarcely 
remarked. 

PEOPLE who turn on the gas, as the easiest and best 
method of settling life's woes, should leave a deposit 
with the landlady beforehand. There is not any too much 
profit in the boarding house business, no matter what the 
texture and fineness of the hash provided, and it is a 
trille inconsiderate to thus play into the hands of a cor- 
poration. Will suicidists please be a little less thoughtless? 
THE man who created a sensation the other night by 
bursting with a yell from his room in the early hours 
of morning, and turning a back somersault in his rolie tie 
nnxt before the terrified guests, should be pitied rather 
than blamed for his unusual conduct. It was not delirium 
tremens, nor sudden nuttiness. He had inadvertently 
fallen asleep while perusing the Sunday Examiner. 

RUMORS from afar declare that the theme of the next 
Woman's Congress will be "Education." This is en- 
couraging. By next year the ladies may get down to solid 
business and discuss cookery. What this community needs 
is good digestion, and in this, fair woman holds man's life 
and temper in her hands. Give us proper food, and the 
millennium is not an impossibility. 

THE actress who desires an honest name, 
Must see her "star" hopes glimmer to a candle, 
The while, across the footlights, like a flame, 
Another woman soars to fortune, fame 

And money, through the magic aid of scandal. 

HAYES VALLEY residents are weary of groping 
about in darkness, falling into defective sewers, yield- 
ing to the too-familiar embrace of the festive footpad and 
the merry thug. They announce their determination to 
have light, and plenty of it, throughout that district. Thus, 
bit by bit, the work of reform goes hopefully on. 

A WOMAN in this city attempted suicide this week, be- 
cause she had two husbands, which was one more 
than she coveted. Strange, very strange. And there 
are others who cannot succeed in landing so much as one 
upon the shore of matrimony. Things are so unevenly 
distributed in this world I 

GOOD news. The main corridor in the New City Hall 
is going to be washed out every night hereafter, instead 
of every three years. By the time the entire building is 
purified, it may occur to the powers that be to purify the 
politics and people, as well as the pavements and floors 
of that historic structure. 

IT is not fair to jump to the conclusion that the post- 
mistress across the bay who eloped with a storekeeper 
and married him, did so merely to get the right to open 
his letters without being liable to the law. No woman's 
curiosity would carry her quite so far. 

IT is refreshing to know that the presence of a lady in 
the Board of Education would cause "embarrassment" 
to the honorable members. We never imagined the blush 
of modesty could tinge the cheeks of these gentlemen. 

' ' \A/^" was " ie man ' hey use< * t0 ca " Uurrant ? 

VV What was his crime? " The Crier does not know. 
Your pardon, dear subscriber, but he can't 
Recall what happened here so long ago. 

THERE are likely to be some broken heads as well as 
broken types in the famous broken-will case of the 
late Senator Fair. But the lawyers are not likely to come 
out broke. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



julIN J. VALRNTINB. President. 5*11 
«.M>CG8 t- GHAV. F'rst ViO»-pRSUeilt, 

Dudley Evans. Snood Vite- President, New York. 
AakkN STBIV. bwrury, San Francisco. 
H. B. Parsons. A\sist.ini Secretary, New York. 
Homer S. King. Traaaorcr, San FranciMo. 



Office of the President. 



San efcau ciaco, ^ecevH&cz 31, 1896. 



Dear Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced iu the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River f including British Columbia) during 1896, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, $54,399,242 ; Silver, $35i7S4»963; 
C(jpper, $28,859,305; Lead, $7,236,026. Total gross result, $126,289,536. The "commercial" value at which the several 
metals mamed herein have been estimated is: Silver, 67 cts. per oz.; Copper, 11 cts. per lb.; and Lead, $3.00 per cwt. 

Allowance must always be made for probable variations from reported figures, by reason of constantly increasing 
facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the express and the difficulty of getting 
entirely reliable data from private sources. Estimates obtained in this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a con- 
siderable degree, guesswork : but with some modifications on this accouut, made herein, the general results reached, while 
only approximately correct, may 1>e accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



California . . , 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana . . . . 
Utah. 



Colorado 

New Mexico 

A rizona 

Dakota 

Texas 

Wyoming ... 

British Columbia (entire Province . 



Total . 



Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion by Other 

Conveyances. 



$11,553.9*8 
1,081,656 

1.746,752 
J45,850 



2,652,500 
4,625,000 

777.698 
[3,712,483 

245.115 
>,3i3.5io 
4,572,265 

25,000 
1,384,000 



<43.035.757 



*3,973.376 

950,000 

203.452 

37,500 

2,7'5,955 



1,163,122 

544,2oo 
1,775,880 



$ 1 1,363,485 



Silver Bullion 
by Express. 



% 83,839 

478,814 

96,784 

170,500 

3,272,682 

9,350,000 

1 ,050,348 

12,185,881 

179.876 

293,6lS 

185,000 

3",730 

3.500 

2,100,000 



Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight 



f29.762.572 



$ 20,248 

248,894 
25,000 

35.000 

2,200,000 

23,295,500 

7,392,591 

1,956,480 

177,600 

5,882,909 

37,500 



856,000 



$42,127,722 



|I5,63I.39I 
2,759.364 
2,071,988 
553.850 
2,750,955 
8,125,182 
37,270,500 

10,383,759 

26,854,844 

1,146,791 

9,265,9'? 

4.794,"65 

3",730 

28,500 

4,340,000 



1126,289,536 



The gross yield for 1S9S. shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 43rfj $ 54,399,242 

Sllver 28^ 35,784,963 

Copper 22,W 28,869,305 

Uad 5rft 7,236,026 



Total $126,289,536 

ANKTML PRODUCTS OF LEAL, COPPER, SILVER AX!. GOLD IN TUB STATES AMD TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1896. 



Year. 



Product : on a. per W. F. 

& Co's Statements. 
Including amounts from 

British Columbii and 

West coast of 

Mexico. 



Product after 
deducting amounts 

from British 

Columbia and Wrst 

Coast of Mtxit <>. 



The NTet Products of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, exclu- 
sive of British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, are as follows : 



1870 

1S71 

1872 

'*73 

■874 

'*75 

1S76 

1877 ... . 
1878 

1879 



■8Sl 

1SS2 

1881 



.... 
1 886 

1 887 

IS88 



1890 

1891 

IS92 

.. . 

r«94 

1895 

1896 



$ 54.000,000 
58,284,000 
62.236,959 
72,258,693 
74.401,045 
80.889,057 

90.87S.173 
9S.42i.754 

81.154.622 
75.349,5oi 
80,167,935 

4,417 
02,411,835 

90,313.612 

84.9o.954 

9o,iSi,26o 

103,011,761 

104.645.959 

'14.341,592 

'27.677,836 

127,166,410 

118.237,441 

1 1 1031,700 

B ' .591 

105,1 13,489 

118,164,642 

126.2S9.536 



$ 52.150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 
76,703.433 
87.219.859 
95,811,582 
7S, 276, 167 
72,6SS,888 
77.232,512 
81,198,474 
89-07,549 
84,639,212 
81,6 

87,311.382 
100,160,222 
103,327,770 
112,665,569 
126,- 

117,946,565 
111,259,508 
103,827,623 
104,S44,i 12 
117 ,8 
121,949.536 



$ 1,080,000 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 
5.742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 
9,185,192 

9,631,073 
11,263,630 

'4,593.32.3 
".509,571 
'2,385,780 
"■433,947 
7.756,040 
8.223,513 

7.170.367 
6,536,026 



$ 898,000 
1,195,000 

4.055.037 
5.683,921 
6,oS6,252 
7,838,036 

9.276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 
'4.793.763 
20,569,092 
'3,261,663 
'9,370.516 

23.631.339 
22,276,294 
27,052,115 
28,713.305 



$17,320,000 
19,286,000 
19,924,429 
27,483,302 
29,699,122 

3'. 635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37,032,857 
38,033,055 
42,987,613 
48,133,039 
42,975.ioi 
43,529,925 

44.516,599 
52,136,851 
50,833,884 
53. '52,747 
64,808,637 
62,930,831 
60,614,004 
50,607,601 
38,491,521 
28,721,014 
35,2/4.777 
33,684,963 



$33,750,000 
34.39S.000 
38,177,395 
39,206,558 
38,466,488 
39,968,194 
42,8S6,935 
44.880,223 
37,576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,067 

30,653,959 
29.011,318 
27,816,640 
25,iS3,567 
26,393,756 
29,561,424 
32,500,067 
29,987,702 
32,527,661 
3'.795.36i 
3i6S 5 ,ii8 
29,847,444 
33.948,723 
45.623,291 
48,399,729 
53015,242 



§%**&?%!?£ Seised "'.\T E&VSShS**** S;r " 1 ^ etc • "»™ '-»" - ™<™>- r™. London. 

at $4 S4. ranctsco, $9,947,7/6. To.al, $43,9'6,395, as against $43,956,78? last year. Pounds Sterling estimated 






January 23, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



»7 



^f.iil-^ States of ^lu.vico. 

STATEMENT OP TUK PftODUCl uf COLD AND SILVER IN TIIH I. • »MD CORRECTED PROM lS--T,>|Sa6 

VA1 ^^ 



:87S 
l879-l830.. 

lSSo-i^M 
1881-1883.. 
1SS2 : 

ISS4-: 

ISS5-1SS6.. 

I&S6-I 

lSSS.. 

1SS9. . 

iSS9-;89o. . 

1S90-1S91. . 

1S91-1S92. 

1892- 

1S93-1894.. 

1S94-1S95.. 

1S95-1S96. . 

Tolal. . 






$ 74T.OOO 
881,000 
943,000 
1,013,000 
937,000 
956,000 
1,055,000 

1,026,000 
1,047,000 
1,031,000 
1 ,040,000 
1,100,000 
1,150,000 
1,275,000 
1,400,000 
1,425,000 
4,750,000 
5,475,000 



f 28, 164,000 



1 1 ,000 

'•9,000 

'5,000 
.'',,000 

34.112,000 
34,60 ,,000 
34,912,000 
40,706,000 
41,500,000 
43,000,000 
45.750,000 
48,500,000 
47,250,000 
54,225,000 
54,450,000 

$708,820,000 






$25,584,000 
26,006,000 

27,742,000 
17,000 
30,266,000 
30,525,000 
32,750,000 
34.140,000 
35,138,000 
35,647,000 
35,943,000 
41,746,000 
42,600,000 
44,150,000 
47,025,000 
49,900,000 
48,675,000 
58,975,000 
59,925,000 



$736,984,000 



EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE ISt OF JULY, 1873, TO THE 

30th OF JUNE, 1S96. 



1873- 

1S74- 

1*75- 
1876- 
'^77- 
187S- 
1879- 
1880- 
18S1- 

1SS2- 
1S83- 
1SS4- 
ISS5- 
1SS6- 
18S7- 

iSSS- 

ISS9- 

IS90- 

1891- 
IS92- 
1S93- 
1894- 
IS95- 



874. 
S75. 

S76. 

S77. 
87S. 

S79- 
8S0. 
SSi. 
8S2. 
SS 3 . 
S84 
SS5. 
SS6. 
SS7. 
SSS. 
SS9. 
S90. 
S91. 
S92. 

893- 
S94. 

395- 



Total . 



Gold Dollars. 



$S66,743 
S62.6I9 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 
452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425.000 
410,000 
340,320 
305,100 
243,29S 
308,000 
291,940 
361,672 
553,978 
545,237 
565. 786 



$11,561,080 



Silver Dollars. 



$18,846,067 
19.386,958 

19.454,054 
21,415,12s 
22,084,203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24.617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 
27,169,876 
30, iSs,6ii 
27,628,981 
22,6 3 4,7S8 



$557.5Si.690 



Copper Dollars. 



$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
41,364 
16,300 

14,035 
42,258 
11,972 



$203,296 



Summary.— Totals: Gold, $11,561,080; Silver, $557,581, 690; Copper, #203 296. Grand Total, $569,346,066. 

EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537 TO THE END OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1896. 



Colonial Epoch. 


Cold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


Total. 




$ S,497,95o 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 

441, 62;. 211 

SSS,56 3 ,9S 9 


$200,000 
342,893 


$760,765,406 








929,298,329 




Independence. 


$68,77S,4ii 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557,392 
45,040,628 


$ iS,575.569 
740,246,485 








$5,235,177 








Republic. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


i5.235.'77 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from istjuly, 1S73, to 30th of June, 1896. . 


$11,561,080 


$557,5Si,690 


$203,296 


$569,346,066 



SUMMARY. 
Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960 ; Iudependence- 
1873 to 1896, $569,346,066. Total, $3,530,583,277. 



■from 1822 to 1873, $809,655,251 ; Republic — from 




^&L£^ZsC^cjiJ 



President. 



_ .. — _ . 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 





VNE of the most strik- 
ing fads of the day is 
the armorial bearings, crests, etc., which are considered 
</. rigut ur for all society peoplr. and it is not a little amus- 
ing the uphill work — real work — it is to many getting up 
the requisite lozenge for note paper, silver, and carriage 
panel. In London, people who wish their crests done (if 
not already in use) begin by tracing descent, searching 
genealogy, and the like. In New York and San Fran- 
cisco this method is, for obvious reasons, not the one fol- 
lowed, so an expert designer is called in to aid the taste 
and wishes of the wealthy fashionables who wish to be up- 
to-date. Several humorous stories are told of what has 
happened in Gotham, where people have been on the 
hunt for crests and mottos, one of them strongly remini- 
scent of the famous mot of Dean Swift, who, on being 
asked by a rich tobacconist to suggest a proper motto for 
his carriage crest, immediately responded: "Why. Quid 
rides, of course." However, as our local Four Hundred is 
of more interest to us than the doings of London or New 
York, we took the pains a few days ago to examine a 
display made by a leading stationer of the recently exe- 
cuted crests and coats of arms designed to order for our 
swagger set. There being " no earthly reason why we 
can't have strawberry leaves if we feel like it," to quote 
from a leading bud. that ducal insignia is used extensively 
as well as the five-pointed coronet and the fleur di Us. 
Hands and daggers, griffens' heads, and lions couchant are 
frequent, but the design of old castles with knights in ar- 
mour seems to be a favorite style. One lady, evidently of 
a sentimental turn of mind, has chosen a transfixed heart 
on a shield. Another pretty devise of originality is a huge 
stack of glittering gold; motto, "Win gold and pile it!" 
Yet another shows a steaming locomotive; motto, "Bound 
by steel." Of course, these are the crests merely; the 
armorial bearings are all more or less gorgeous in coloring 
and heraldry, and mark an epoch in our fashionable pro- 
gress nt this rin 1I1 slide, for no one who is any one can 
afford to be without a crest nowadays. 

# * # 

Another mark of our gradual adoption of things British 
is the hunt, which is apparently hovering about from 
country to town, unsettled where to stay. The difficulty 
of drawing sufficiently large numbers of participants to the 
San Mateo line to make the thing a success, has induced the 
indefatigable members of the Pacific Avenue riding club to 
to take a hand and try what can be done in the way of a 
hunt over hedges, fences, ditches, and fields in the Ingle- 
side District, whereby the club may display its horseman- 
ship, and the city folk may indulge in joining the sport, 
either as riders or onlookers. That it will be a success 
of course remains to be seen, but at all events it will be a 
brilliant "try." as many of the leading lights of the swim 
are among the members of the riding school. 

# * * 

Gossip says that when those thoroughly equipped younc 
ladies, the Misses Ethel Keeney and Leontine Blakeman, 
finally enter society as acknowledged grown-up girls] 
they will be the sensation of the season: also that Miss 
Florence Breckenridge is another girl who will make a 
brilliant addition to society's ranks So it behooves those 
girls who are stars of this year's social firmament to make 
hay while the sun shines, and get out of the way of the 
new lights. 

# * « 

Several feasts are in prospect for our epicures. ( >n- 
Tuesday last, a swell banquet was given at the Presidio 
for three hundred persons. On Tuesday next, the Laurel 
Hall Club will give a supper for two hundred and fifty 
guests at Beethoven Hall, and on February 4th. Mr. and 
Mrs. H. P. Spitz will celebrate their golden wedding by 
giving a dinner to seventy-five of their friends at the Con- 
cordia Club. All these functions will be attended to by 
Max Abraham, the well-known caterer. 



Miss Elizabeth Carroll's many friends are growling at 
not having been allowed the pleasure of seeing her in her 
nuptial robe, as tbey had hoped a church wedding would 
have been her choice, but Miss Elizabeth is nothing if not 
positive, and she is said to have set her little foot down 
very positively on an elaborate wedding, reserving all that 
sort of thing for the Whittier mansion. 

* * # 

If rumor speaks by the card, one of the bridesmaids who 
will attend Miss Carroll will hereafter be a bride ere many 
moons have waned. " Miss Julia Crocker, of course," say 
our readers. Not so, dear friends. Stately Miss Romie 

Wallace is the one meant. 

* * * 

The perfect delight with which young Boardman was 
greeted upon his return to health and appearance at the 
card party by the owner of those lovely eyes, should have 
satisfied him that one conquest at least has fallen to his 
share in the new Year. 

* * * 

Sausalito folks are greatly exercised over some city gos- 
sip which declares that Claude Terry Hamilton has fol- 
, lowed Charley Mcintosh's example, and is engaged. 

* # * 

The new army contingent can boast of several pretty 
women among them, as evidenced by the military ball- 
room on Tuesday evening last. 

Japanese curios are sought after the whole world over bat in no 
place can such rare ones be obtained as in San Francisco. The 
visitor to the store of G. T. Marsh & Co., 625 Market Street, will ob- 
tain the best obtainable at very reasonable prices. The store is well 
worth a visit. 

The FINEST GIN Imported. 



Especially Adapted for Family Use 
and Medicinal Purposes. 

In Large Square White Bottles. 



Annexed Trade Mark - 
Appears on Cap and - < 
is Blown in Shoulder 



Sold by Grocers and Dealers. ..Beware of Filled-Up Bottles 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents. 3N Sacramento St. , S. F. 





Going out of 
Business. 



Commencing flonday, Jan. 4th 



$125,000 



CLOAKS, 
SUITS, etc. 

The entire stock to be sold during n^xt 30 
days a* a TREMENDOUS SACRIFICE. 

ARriAND CAILLEAU, 

Cor. deary St. and Grant Ave. 



January 23, 1897. 




SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






9, ^ H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



T * * 



UI ?S> 



• The difference at present U-tween the handsome young 
woman and the codfish," said the cheerful idiot, in answer 
to a question he had evidently put to himself before sitlins 
down at the table— -'the difference between the handsome 
young woman and the codfish is. that one has a chance to 
become a fall bride and the other to become a hall fried " 
After that the hired girl passed them.— Indianapolis 
Journal. 

Crimsonbe.k— I knew that fellow Storms, the comedian 
would come to the front. Yeast— And he has, has he?" 
"Why, certainly. You remember he used to play the part 
of the hind legs of a heifer?" "Yes." "Well, now he's 
playing the front legs."— Yonkers Statesman. 

Teacher— AYho can tell me what induced Sir Walter 
Raleigh to spread his cloak over a puddle for Queen 
Elizabeth to pass? Tommy (whose father holds a city ap- 
pointment)— He was tryin' for the job of street commission- 
er. — Pearson's Weekly. 

"I'll woo thee in the moonlight," sang the lover to his 
girl, who was gazing fondly on him from the casement. 
"It's much cheaper than the gaslight," sang her father, 
the old churl, who was taking observations from the base- 
ment.— Tit-Bits. 

"I win have revenge on my husband!" shrieked the wo- 
man. "Allow me, madam," said a stranger, with a 
sympathetic gleam in his eye, "to show you this book on 
the art of making shirts." — Judge. 

Cholly— I wonder if your father would fly into a passion 
if I asked him for you? Adelaide — Not if you tell him 
first that he looks twenty years younger since he shaved 
off his whiskers. — Cleveland Leader. 

Proprietor — Go tell that man who just came in to shut the 
door. I hate such carelessness! Clerk — That wasn't 
carelessness on his part, sir; it was precaution. He's a 
book agent. — Roxbury Gazette. 

"Do you think Julia will accept the offer of her foreign 
lover?" "No; her father says when they go abroad they 
may get something cheaper and just as good." — Chicago 
Record. 

Fifth Form Boy — Please, I want a pair of gloves. 
Gentlemen's Outfitter — Kid gloves? Fifth Form Boy 
— No, no. Gloves for grown-up people! — Comic Cuts. 

"So Boston rejected MacMonnies' 'Bacchante'?" "Yes; 
they were annoyed because she carried a bunch of grapes 
instead of a pot of baked beans." — Chicago Record. 

"Was the brute who struck his wife punished by the 
court?" "No; when it came to the trial the woman would 
not acknowledge herself beaten." — Tit-Bits. 

Hicks — Are you fond of children? Wicks — Immoder- 
ately. A bouse is so restful after the little dears have been 
put to bed. — Exchange. 

"Does your wife ever call you up on the telephone?" 
"Yes; she calls me down on it, too, sometimes." — Yonkers 
Statesman. 

"I never saw a more perfect fit than that dress, Miss 
Rosebud." "I did; when papa got the bill for it. " — 
Answers. 

"And now they say that genius is a disease." "Don't 
let that scare you; you look perfectly healthy." — Chicago 
Record. 

She — It must be a terrible thing to be paralyzed. He 
— It is. You feel so mean the next morning. — Life. 

Are You Going East? 
The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, Santa Fe Route, is the coolest 
and most comfortable summer line, owing to its elevation and ab- 
sence of alkali dust. Particularly adapted to the transportation of 
families or large parties, owing to its Pullman palace drawing room 
and modern upholstered tourist sleepers, which ran daily through 
from Oakland to Chicago via Kansas City. Ticket office, 644 Market 
street, Chronicle building. Telephone Main 1531. 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents. 

San Frtncitco, Ca 



309 and 311 Sansome St 



CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM * HRODIE 48 and 46Throadn«M>dIo 81. London 

SIMPSON, MACKJRDY a 00 » South Caalle St., LlT.rpool 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OP MANCHESTER, ENGL ND. 

SOLID SECURITY ZOVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 439 California St., S. P. 

Fire Insurance. 

Founded A. D. 179?. 

Insurance Company ot North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,010 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3,192.001 69 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,506,409.41 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 
B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. Established 1896 

Capital. I2,250,0%> Total Assets, 16,851,658 65. 
UNITED STATE EPARTMKNT : 304 Sansome St., S. P. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON swished m 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated mt 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 
413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OP LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16,700,001) 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 316 California st., S. F 

nD Dli , nnn'<? RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genu" 
Ut\. n\\s<Ut\U O lne _ Aspeolflo for Exhausted Vitality, Physloal 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Aoademy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Paclflo States. 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palaoe Hotel), San Franolaoo. 
Sent by mall or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 60 pills, II 86; of 100 pills, »2; of900plUl, 
18 60; of 400 pills, 16 ; Preparatory Pills, 12. Send for circular. 



SAX FRAN-CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897 



In response to many inquiries from 
all parts of the country about the 
Railway and Dock Construction 
Company 



The officials hereby give full infor- 
mation in regard to the company, 
its business and prospects. 



The company offers 20,000 shares of stock for sale in lots to suit 
purchasers at $20 per share. The par value ia $100 per share— full 
paid and unassessable — stockholders have no individual liability 
whatever. The company has no indebtedness of any kind— is in 
solid financial condition— and, as there are no bonds nor mortgages, 
all the earnings go to the stockholders. 

The adoption of this Company's system of construction by the 
United States Government, or any Foreign Government, or by any 
one of the large cities in America or Europe will cauee the stock to 
rise above par ($100) immediately. 

The most conservative investors, old shrewd bear operators on the 
stock exchange, have bought this stock and confidently predict it is 
sure to pay large dividends and sell at over $200 a share as the Rail 
way and Dock Construction Co. commence business under much 
more favorable conditions than did the Bell Telephone Co., whose 
slock rose from about $10 to over 200; or the original Edison Electric 
Co., whose stock rose from 45 to $3000 a share, or the many other 
companies owning useful inventions whose stocks rose rapidly in 
value while paying large dividends to the alert original investors. 

Many prominent men in banking, railway and financial circles 
and other expert judges of stock values predict that this stock will 
pay large dividends and will sell at over $200 per share for the 
following reasons: 

The Railway and Dock Construction Company controls all the 
rights, titles, patents and interests in and the sole, absolute and ex- 
clusive right to manufacture and sell the new indestructible piles 
that do away altogether with the millions of wooden piles heretofore 
used everywhere, which only last a short time, as alternate moisture 
and drying and the marine worms soon destroy the wood, and leave 
adeceptive shell, incapable to sustain a load that requires the full 
strength of the original pile. Old wooden piles must be continually 
replaced at great expense. 

Nothing can compete with the indestructible Pile in the construc- 
tion of piers, docks, bulkheads, sea-walls, foundations for bridges, 
lighthouses, jetties, breakwaters or other improvemeuts in riveis. 
harbors or on the sea coast. 

This pile is an absolute necessity in railway trestlework as i. 
guarantees safety, and it will last forever, and tnereis an enormous 
demand for it. 

One defective wooden pile derailing a train causes a loss of many 
thousands of dollars in lives and property destroyed. 

Applications are pouring in from engineers, contractors and rail- 
way officials all over the United States. These men are quick to see 
the certainty of profit. They are perhaps better able to judge than 
others, because, out of a total of 1891 railroads, 373 of these railway 
companies are now preparing to build 20,547 miles of new line. The 
great superiority of the Railway and Dock Construction Company's 
system of solid, substantial, indestructible trestle work is causing 
the demand in this special held. 

Estimated earnings from this one source of profit will pay $7 per 
share annual dividends— this is equal to 35 per cent, cash dividends 
per year on stock bought now at present price of $20 per share. 

Other and larger sources of profit will come from contracts now in 
view, viz: — 

In place of the old wooden docks, covered by temporary sheds. 
which now disfigure the water fronts of our cities, this company will 
build solid, indestructible [tiers, on which permanent iron, stone or 
brick buildings are put up just the same as on land. 

Private owners of dock property as well as dock officials in the 
numerous cities are becoming aware of the great advantage of using 
the Railway and Dock Construction Company's system of building 
Indestructible piers to make a solid foundation, upon which large 
buildings can be erected, from which they can get big revenues for 
rentals, etc. 

$27,000,000 have already been expended in improving Southern 
harbors and their approaches. 

1 it projects now under way over fifty million dollars will be spent 
In improving navigation in rivers, bays, etc., throughout the coun- 



try on jetties, breakwater-, and otber work in which the indestructi- 
ble Pile is a great necessity. 

The city of New York is spending $5,000 000 a year improving the 
city water front. 

In a private conversation Hon. J. Sergeant Cram, ex-President of 
the Board of Dock Commissioners said: "There is an immense 
fortune in this company's system of construction." 

The r. S. Senate Committee have recommended the expenditure 
of eighty million dollars for the protection of our seacoast. About 
ten millions a year will be spent during the next eight years. 

The United Siates Government spent about $10,000,000 in deepen- 
ing the entrance of the Mississippi to divert tidal action by old style 
work, which will be supplanted in future by the Railway and Dock 
Construction Company's system. $6 000,000 has already been ex- 
pended on the two immense jetties in the bay at Galveston: they 
are simply loose rock dumped into the water. Each jetty is about 
\ l A miles long and forms a continuous pyramid 1U0 feet wide at the 
bottom, tapering to 15 feet wide at the top above the water. The 
Railway and Dock Construction Company build indestructible 
jetties of the same size at the bottom as the top and save this enor- 
mous waste of stone and labor. 

The "St. Louis Critic" strongly advocates the adoption of this com- 
pany's system of indestructible jetties to deepen the Mississippi at 
St. Louis. 

To provide additional funds to execute some of this work, the 
company offers 20,000 shares to the public in lots to suit at the 
low price of $20.00 per share in order to have the stock quickly 
taken. There are no salaried officials. The money derived from the 
sale of stock, when not used in profitable construction work, remains 
in the company's treasury. 

Many leading marine engineers and experts say: ''This com- 
pany's system of construction is coming into universal use in build- 
ing all improvements in rivers and harbors." 

As the business in sight is too large for this company to handle 
alone, the subsidiary companies now being organized in the 
principal States each pay a certain amount in cash and one-third 
of their capital stock into the Railway and Dock Construction Co.'s 
treasury. In addition to large sums in cash the company will re- 
ceive about $20,000,000 in securities in this way, on which dividends 
will be paid from the earnings of the subsidiary companies. These 
dividends all go to the- holders of Railway an J Dock Construction 
stock. 

With a large surplus and an ample cash working capital the com- 
pany will hold assets ol $200 per share for each share now offered at 
$20 when all details are completed. 

Application will be made to list the shares on the stock exchange. 

< >wing to the financial depression and uncertainty before the elec- 
tion the Railway and Dock Construction Company would not accept 
numerous contracts for work amounting to about three millions of 
dollars. They were offered first mortgage bonds in payment but the 
bonds could not be sold at that time in New York or London at 
satisfactory prices. English bankers are now negotiating to p' --*• a 
large block of Railway and Dock Construction stock and apply 
for an official quotation on the London Stock Exchange. 

The officials and large stockholders are well-known practical 
financiers and business men, whose names are at once a synonym for 
trustworthy, capable management and a guarantee that any stock 
in which they invest is safe, solid and profitable. Among them are 

Among the stockholders are: 

<ieo. W. Dunn, Esq., president of the company, head of the bank- 
ing house of George \V. Dunn & Co., New York, and president, 
director and trustee of other corporations ; he has been prominent in 
Wall Street for 20 years as a careful level-beaded financier; Hon. 
Thomas Murphy . vice-president, ex-Senator, Collector of the port of 
New York under President U. S. Grant; R. A. B. Dayton. Esq., 
counsel for the company. Temple Court, New York ; Eugene Harvey, 
Esq., second vice-president, banker, Drexel building, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; R. M. Stanbrough, Esq.. Kingston, N. Y. ; George D. Hilyard, 
Esq., contractor, N. Y.; W. R. Childs, Esq., of the Calumet and 
Hecla Copper Company, Calumet, Mich. ; Edward A. Wilson, Esq., 
secretary; M. Hoff, assistant secretary ; George B. Shelborn, Esq.. 
receiver, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa and Memphis Railway Co., 
Montgomery, Ala: Y. Carryer, Esq., of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company, Field, B. C, Canada; Howard Swineford, Esq., of 
Howard Swineford & Co. Richmond, Va. ; Jacob Deyo, cashier, 
Huguenot Bank, New Paltz.N. Y.; S. J. Gifford, Dunkirk, N. Y.. 
and several rich and influential railway and political magnates who 
will have seats in the Board of Directors later on. 

Address all applications for stock and remit for the number of 
shares wanted to the Financial Agents of the company, Messrs, 

GEO. W. DUNN & CO., 
2 Wall St., New York. 

by check, draft, money order, registered letter or by express; or 
have the stock sent by express C. O. D. 

The right is reserved to reject any application for stock. and to 
allot only a part of the shares applied for, and to advance the price 
without notice. 






January 23. 1897. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



sO*K 









/, ;■<?•• 






DEAR EDITH - It la surprising what a quantity of 
dresses are trimmed with fur, both for day ami even- 
ing wear. Here is a dinner gown of cabbage green satin. 

which is a good model of the fur-trimmed indoor d 
The edge of the trained skirt is trimmed with a ti 
inch band made up alternately of antique lace insertion 
and bands of golden otter as wide as the lace, the fur 
bands being edged with two tiny folds of mauve velvet. 
This affords a wonderfully fine color combination, the vel- 
vet edge showing up the golden tinge of fur, and contrasts 
beautifully with the green satin. The low satin bodice is 
partly covered with a lace Figaro, edged with fur and 
velvet, the lace being embroidered all over with amethysts. 
The tight sleeve is of jeweled lace with a satin shoulder 
drapery held with amethyst brooches. The waist on the 
pointed bodice is marked by four tiny bands of mauve 
velvet. 

Mrs. Annie Jenness Miller says that she believes that 
the house dress of the future will be short enough; "that 
the woman who goes upstairs or who goes around with all 
kinds of household implements, will be able to go upstairs 
naturally, three steps at a time if she wants to, and get 
all the benefit she can out of that exercise. Going up and 
down stairs is the best exercise in the world. And yet 
you can find learned doctors who will warn women against 
going up and down stairs. They do it justly, too, because 
the learned doctor knows that a woman who has a lot of 
skirts pressing down, who lifts herself up and down stairs 
on levers, so to speak, churns all the vital organs and does 
herself infinite harm. 

"I have invented a houseworker'd dress which any wo- 
man can carry out for herself," Mrs. Miller went on to 
say. "It does not require a pattern. All you have to do 
is to make the skirt come half way between the knees and 
the ankle, and make the waist and skirt all in one piece. 
Then you can have a little Eton jacket hanging over a 
chair, and when a caller comes in all you have to do is to 
slip off your apron and slip on your jacket, and you can 
entertain your friends in the parlor. That is utility in 
dress." 

For evening dress the rou"d-waisted blouse-bodice is 
giving place to the corsage with small points back and 
front. This is good news because the points suit all 
figures; the waistbelt does not. The. belt demands a small 
waist and a graceful slenderness of build. Figures of the 
broad type look far better in a pointed bodice. 

Grotesque indeed are some of the latest "picture" hats 
sent out, composite as to decoration and fearfully and 
wonderfully made. The brims in many cases are irregular 
frills of velvet, the crown ridiculously high, the folds ar- 
ranged in the most fantastic fashion. The apex of some 
of the Mother Goose shapes sometimes threatens to over- 
weigh the base of the crown. Jeweled pins, clasps and 
slides are put in to keep the puffs and folds in place. If a 
plain-covered shape, the crown is of the jam-pot order, 7 
or 8 inches high perhaps. Bands of satin, bead galloon or 
jet encircle the crown, there is a lowering bouquet of 
black ostrich feathers with others quite as long sprawling 
anywhere over the brim, sometimes directly in front right 
over the face, or overhanging the brim by some inches at 
the back. Belinda. 

Paso Robles. 
Our new mud bath house is finished. The arrangement of baths, 
dressing rooms, etc., are on the same floor. No stairs or steps to 
climb. We are now unquestionably the finest sanitarium or health 
resort on the Pacific Coast. Rest and health seekers are Paso Eobles 
seekers, Rates, $10, $12.50, $15, and $17.50 per week. Climate warm. 



Of all the well-tried Bourbon whiskeys on the market the cele- 
brated "Argonaut'' brand is undoubtedly the peer. This delectable 
fluid has been recommended by the most eminent physicians and 
has proven itself a favorite among connoisseurs. The agents for 
this Coast are Messrs. B. Martin & Co, 411 Market street, whose 
reputation alone is a guaranty for the fine quality of their goods. 



Blanket Business. 



TON v [Lt-8 

toads, bMutttfaitf n 

■ 
bought them rtn-ftp, and a 
us, we are detenu - 



nHpell- ITl m'K 

. . ■ ■ ■ - 

M is t tut 1 wo 
11 upon 



L.«i 1.. Fine While W.-l Wackem. from the Kloekinn Mlllx, * Q C)C 

M inches wide, not many loft, Per pair «Dc).Zt) 

as lol 1. hut made for eitra large beds, ff O QC 

the t6 kind, over 6 feel wide Por pair wO* /*) 

Lot 8 -s heavier grade than lot I, and same size (for double ff o OC 

beds), solid and durable, B 16.75 blanket. Per pair «!>e).Oe/ 

Lot -I— About 300 pairs Extra tirade Fine Lomb's-Wool Blun- 

keta, 78 Inches wide, the $7 50 blanket. Special this week *J "ic 

Per pair «d4./D 

Lot 5— Heaviest Texture Fine White Blankets, same size as (i CA 

lot 1. on sale at tD'f.cjU 

Lot 6— Best Grade and Largest Size of the Entire Purchase, <TZ AA 

solid and heavy. Per pair <!)0-UV/ 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

MT. VERNON CO., Baltimore. 

The undersigned, having been appointed AgentB for the 
Paciflo Coast for the sale of the manufactures of above 
company, have now In store : 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS. 

HYDRAULIC— ALL NUMBERS. 

DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK. 

From 30 to 120 Inches wide; and a complete assortment 
of all qualities SS^-inch duck, from 7 to 15 ozs., Inclusive. 

MURPHY, ORANT & CO. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending December 31. 1896, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and twn-tenths (4 2-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and one-half (3V4) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, January 2, 1897. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as 
the principal from and after January 1, 1897 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor, Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with Deo. 31, 1896, a dividend aas been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three and 
one-third (8><j) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, January 2, 1897. 

Office— 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with Dec. 31st, 1896, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and twenty-six one hundredths (4 26-luO) per cent 
per annum on Term Deposits, and three and fifty-five one hundredths 
(3 55-100) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Saturday, January 2, 1897. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office — 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Dec. 30, 1896. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (41 per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six months ending December 30, 1896, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2, 1897. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



Jotyannis 



is conceded to be the finest table water 
ever imported. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



AT THE OAPITOL. 



Sacramento, January 21, lyn". 

THE expusi of the outrageous squandering of the tax- 
payers' money in the temporary organization of the 
Assembly, seems to have had the effect of causing that 
body to think a bit when any appropriation bill or resolu- 
tion disbursing money comes up for action. There is a com- 
bination of Republican members, who, with the Democrats 
and Populists, will oppose any measure that savors of an 
extravagant disposal of the public funds, and it is to be 
hoped they will be able to keep the wayward members 
in check. 

In relation to the temporary roll scandal, I have been 
reliably informed that investigation showed that the ac- 
commodating Chief Clerk of the Assembly, Mr. Duckworth, 
who, by the way, thinks he has been "roasted" — possibly 
because he feels he deserves a " roast" — appointed some 
thirty attachfa on the recommendation of the temporary 
Sergeant-at-Arms, Parkinson, and from two to six attachis 
for certain Assemblymen who had political debts to pay. 
There are some Republican members who think it would 
be good party politics to relieve Mr. Duckworth of his 
onerous duties, and liud some clerk who is competent as 
well as honest. It would not be hard to find one as com- 
petent. I have heard nothing more of the Breiling charges, 
and suppose they will be overlooked along with the Duck- 
worth temporary roll scandal. Justice is blind, but Assem- 
bly investigating committees are deaf, dumb, and blind. 

Since the above was written, the Republican Assembly 
caucus has reached a commendable decision. If Mr. Duck- 
worth will not resign, he may be impeached. Mr. Cutter 
is reported as having sarcastically remarked that the 
members of the Assembly who aided the stuffing of the 
Assembly temporary attachi roll might consistently also 
resign. The State would really be the gainer thereby. 

There has been exhibited here during the week a voting 
machine, that has attracted not only much attention, but 
much favorable comment, and there is little doubt but that 
a law will be passed this session permitting the use of 
machines at elections. The machine referred to is the 
Ducas voting machine, and those who have seen others 
say this is the simplest and best of any. It is so arranged 
that a person can only vote once for each officer to be 
elected; for two or more when that number are to be 
voted for, and mixed, straight or independent candidates 
can be voted. The ingenuity displayed in its construction 
is wonderful, and not alone does it automatically totalize 
each candidate's vote, but on a paper roll marks con- 
secutively the vote of each candidate. Mr. Ducas, the in- 
ventor, explains its simplicity and excellence to large 
crowds all day long. 

There has been introduced a bill making it an offense, as 
well as grounds for damages, to refuse a negro any privi- 
lege or accommodation allowed a white man. From what 
I've seen there is little need of a law of the kind in Califor- 
nia. If negroes have not already these craved-for rights, 
they take them and a good many more. A law curtailing 
their privileges might be more in place. 

The woman suffragist is once more offensive hereabouts. 
They are nothing if not persistent, and probably will get 
little but trouble for their pains. A new argument with 
them is that Chinamen voted in San Francisco, and they 
want to know if a woman is not as good as a Chinaman. 

Senator Mahouey was last week chosen Chairman of the 
San Francisco delegation, and Senator Percy Henderson, 
Secretary. Senator Samuel Braunhart is reported to 
have nominated and voted for himself for Chairman, being 
violently opposed to Mahoney. Senator Braunhart ought 
to feel himself highly complimented by himself. 

Assemblyman Power of San Francisco has introduced a 
bill providing for the construction of the sea wall from 
Market street to the China Basin. 

Colonel Thomas F. Barry has been urging the passage of 
bills for the relief of several National Guardsmen who were 
injured during the railroad strike of 1894, while in the 
performance of their duties. It is to be hoped these just 
claims against the State will be favorably considered. 

Senator Bert has introduced a bill prohibiting nickel-in- 
the-slot machines of any description. It ought to pass. 

Senator Feeney has introduced a couple of suspicious- 



looking bills. One prohibits the lowering of an upper 
berth in a sleeping-car unless it is occupied by a bona'jide 
tenant, and the other prohibits employees of telephone or 
electric light companies from going into a private house or 
place of business to repair or string wires without a writ- 
ten permit, under penalty of fine. These are a fine-look- 
ing brace of cinch bills. However, there are a number of 
others already introduced— not by Mr. Feeney, however. 
Assemblyman Treacy, who was elected on the despised 
so-called '• Buckley " ticket, is one of the most capable 
men from San Francisco, and has the honor of bringing 
about the passage of the first bill this session— his own 
measure, fixing the minimum wages to be paid on public 
work at $2 per day. It is too bad that there are not more 
Treacvs in the San Francisco delegation. 

One of the most highly respected and able members of 
the Senate is C. M. Simpson, who represents the Thirty- 
sixth District. Mr. Simpson is a hold-over Republican, 
and last session, and in this as well, his record is a most 
favorable one. When Mr. Simpson has anything to say 
he says it, and his influence is not second to any man 

in the Senate. Down in 
Pasadena where Mr. Simp- 
son lives, he is thought 
highly of. He was a mem- 
ber of the Assembly in the 
session of 1893, and prior to 
that was a member of the 
City Council. Before com- 
ing to California from Kan- 
sas, where he resided, Mr. 
Simpson was clerk of the 
District Court for eight 
years, Councilman, City At- 
torney and Mayor in turn, 
for men of ability and integ- 
rity are appreciated as 
much in Kansas as they are 
in California. Mr. Simpson 
is a talented lawyer, and is 
chairman of the very im- 
portant Judiciary Commit- 
tee, besides being a member 
of the Committees on Com- 
merce, Harbors, Rivers and Coast Defences; Corpora- 
tions; Counties and County Boundaries, and Libor and 
Capital. Senator Simpson is an untiring worker, and it is 
to be hoped an appreciated one by his constituents. 

There is a young man in the Assembly to whom I want to 
call particular attention, because he will, and has, directed 
it to himself, and has laid the stepping stones to a bright 
political future. I refer to 
E. J. Emmons, the talented 
Representative of the Six ty- 
sixth District. Mr. Em- 
mons was the fusion nomi- 
nee of the Populists and the 
Democrats, and being with 
the minority of the Assem- 
bly, can do comparatively 
little, from a political stand- 
point. However, with his 
great ability he has forced 
himself to the front as a 
recognized leader, and in 
point of ability, is the peer 
of any member of the lower 
house. In Bakersfield, 
where Mr. Emmons resides 
and has a large and lucra- 
tive law business, he is uni- 
versally liked and respect- 
ed. The friend of every 
just cause or measure, and 

the open, avowed enemy of anything that savors of chican- 
ery or dishonesty, he is the kind of man specially fitted for 
a legislator. A forcible and ready debater, he is often 
heard, but wastes no time nor words in saying. Mr. Em- 
mons has introduced and will urge the passage of consider- 
able important legislation, and he is a valuable member of 
the committees on County and Township Governments; 
Contested Elections; Federal Relations; and Judiciary. 




M Simpson 




K. ■/. EmtHon?. 



January 23, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.li 



*S 




r. Morehouse. 



A lawyer of ability, an orator of note, am! .1 
who is a leader in ti ■ of Ma party. Is Senator 

Harry V. Morehouse, ofS fitly repn 

the Thirty Jir t. 

He Is tireless in the dis- 
charge of his duties, and the 
va-t amount of work he has 
taken upon himself to per- 
form shows that Santa Clara 
County made no mistake in 
choosing him. Mr. More 
house came to California 
with his parents when a 
child four years of aj;e. and 
after a proper schooling 
was admitted to the bar. 
He was District Attorney 
of Monterey County, and 
practiced his profession at 
Salinas, before moving to 
San Jose. He is chairman 
of the Committee on Labor 
and Capital, one of the most 
important committees this 
session, as well as a member 
of the Committees on City, 
City and County and Towu Government, Education and 
Public Morals; Judiciary: and Public Buildings. 

Peo. 

WELL KNOWN IN THE MINING WORLD. 

NOW that the miuing industry has received so healthy 
a stimulus, and new and paying properties are crop- 
ping up all over the West, the firms that are interested 
in the manufacture and erection of Mining and Milling 
Machinery will undoubtedly be the first to experience a 
return of good times. Mr. Rogers, of the firm of White, 
Rogers & Co., 306 Pine street, speaking in this connection 
the other day, said the firm of which he is a member and 
which is composed of experienced and practical Engineers, 
has already received many new. and some very large 
orders for Mining and Milling machinery and supplies, all 
of which they are now able to furnish their patrons at prices 
much lower than formerly prevailed on this Coast. 

Some of the largest stamp Mills and Hoisting plants 
have been constructed by this well-known firm, the mem- 
bers of which have been engaged in this business for the 
past thirty-six years, during which period they have 
gained a wide experience in Milling and Mining, which now 
proves of great value to their many clients, needing Mining 
or Milling Machinery of any description. 

In mining more than in almost any other branch of busi- 
ness practical experience is required for the proper selec- 
tion and construction of reduction works to treat the 
various grades of ores discovered. 

Many good prospects and even well developed mines have 
been ruined by the want of this experience, and the em- 
ployment of incompetent persons to equip them. 

The best is none too good for success, and it is manifestly 
foolish to employ a shoemaker when a Lawyer or Doctor 
is required — but strange as it may appear this is frequent- 
ly done in a mining sense and failure naturally results. 
The wisdom of dealing with competent, reliable firms in any 
profession where such services are needed, requires no 
demonstration to successful men, and this is particularly 
true of mining. 

In addition to the firm's wide experience as construct- 
ing engineers, ranging over every mineral section from 
Alaska to South America, they have been able to obtain 
very valuable knowledge of the mines in all of these various 
districts and can in many instances obtain valuable prop- 
erty at very reasonable prices and sometimes secure 
great bargains, which not only advances their own inter- 
ests but all others, when experienced men become inter- 
ested in either new or old mining districts. 

This knowledge has often proved of great value, and has 
helped to promote the healthy growth of a legitimate 
business industry, which mining always is, when conducted 
on lines of well-established business practice. 

Irritation of the Throat and Hoarseness are immediately relieved 
by " Brown's Bronchial Troches." Have them always ready. 




time, etc, and the 
doing away with 



Mistress-Maid 

have their part in 
the great sa\ ings that 
ome from Pearline. 
Suppose you're the 
mistress. There's 
the economy • 
the su\ ing of 
actual money that's saved by 
that ste.uh- wear and tear on 
everything washed. Suppose you're the maid. 
There's the savin- of labor; the absence of rub- 
bing; the hardest part of the housework made 
easier and pleasanter. Hut suppose you are 
mistress and maid, both in one, doing your own 
work. Then there is certainly twice as much 
reason why you should do every bit of your wash- 
ing and cleaning with Pearline. m 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

Ostrander Repeating Gun Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. LocatiOQ of 
works or factory— 36 New street, East Boston. Mass. 

NOTICE— There are delinquent upon the following described stoclt, on 
account of an assessment (No 5). levied on the 33d day of August, 1896, 
the several amounts set opposite the names of the respective shurehold 
ers, as follows : 

No. No 

Name. Certificate Shares Am t 



W. P Rav. U «. N. 


1*8 


1.000 


100 


Mrs Elizabeth Carter 


191 


600 


50 




311 


boo 


50 


J. M. Helm 


164 


600 


60 


• L 


258 


301 


30 10 


" 


360 


195 


'5 50 


Catherines Whiteside 


9111 


1.UI0 


100 


George H Hoover 


389 


so 


5 


Mrs. Mary Mearse Gait 


I7S1 


1,000 


1011 


E. P. Cole 


397 


500 


50 



And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of Directors, made 
on the 22d day of August, 189B, so many shares of each parcel of such 
stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, at the office of 
the company, No. 216 Bush street, rooms 5i> and 51. CUy and County of San 
Francisco, California, on 

THURSDAY, THE 22nd DAY OF OCTOBER, 1896, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m. of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment" 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
Office— No. 216 Bush street. Rooms 50 and 51, SanFrancisco, Califo nia. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was post- 
poned until 

FRIDAY, the 20th DAY of NOVEMBER, 1896, 
at the same time and plac*. M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 

SanFrancisco, October 22, 1896. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Dlreotors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held this day, the sale of the above delinquent stock was post- 
poned until 

FRIDAY, the 18th DAY of DECEMBER, 1896, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26, 216 Bush street, San Francisoo, Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, November 19, 1896. 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held at the office of the company on the 18th inst., the sale of the 
above delinquent stock was postponed until 

THURSDAY, the 14th DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26, 216 Bush street. San Francisco, Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, Dec. 28, 1897 

POSTPONEMENT. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Ostrander Repeating Gun 
Company, held at the office of the company, on the 6th inst., the sale of the 
above delinquent stoclt was postponed until 

WEDNESDAY, the 27th DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the same time, at rooms 25 and 26, 216 Bush street, San Francisco. Cal. 
M. WATERS KIRWAN, Secretary. 
SanFrancisco, January 6, 1897. _^__^__ 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Belcher Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the effico of the company, rooms 37 
and 38, third floor Mills building, San Francisco, Cal., on 

TUESDAY, THE 26TB DAY OF JANUARY, 1897, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Satur- 
day, the 23d day of January, 1897 at 12 o'clock m. 

C L. PERKINS, Secretary. 
Office—Rooms 37 and 38, third floor, Mills Building, N. E. corner Bush 
and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, Cal. 



24 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897 




OUR beauty and fashion shone in divided ranks on 
Tuesday evening, but society is now so large three or 
'our functions can take place an irn'mi tempt, and there 
will still be more than enough to go round. The musical 
events of the week have been, of course, the Nordica con- 
certs, and the opening one of the series drew such an audi- 
ence to the Baldwin on Tuesday evening as has not been 
seen in that pretty little theatre for many moons. The 
ball at the Presidio the same evening was one of those de- 
lightful button affairs that are always so enjoyed by our 
belles. The civilian beaux might perhaps tell a different 
tale. The hop room was an extremely pretty sight, with 
its military adornments of bunting, sabres, small arms, 
flowers and foliage, and the guests were made welcome by 
their hosts, who were resplendent in all the glory of mili- 
tary toggery Gold lace and bright buttons were largely 
in evidence among the men, and as for the ladies, they all 
looked charmingly in most becoming and handsome attire. 
Dancing was the order of the evening, ODly interrupted by 
an elaborate supper served towards midnight, after which 
the dance was resumed for several hours longer. 

Mrs. Benson's gathering at the Presidio on Monday 
was much enjoyed by her guests; so also was Mrs. Avery 
McCarthy's "at home' on Tuesday. Among the pleasant 
affairs of the month have been the Wednesday "at homes" 
of Mrs. Southard Boffman and her daughter. Mrs. Pedar 
Sather's recent luncheon in Oakland was an exceedingly 
pleasant gathering; it was given in honor of Mrs. J. M. 
Phillips, to meet whom thirty guests were invited. Last 
night the Friday Fortnightly Club, of Oakland, had a 
dance in Ebell Ball. 

The meeting of the San Francisco Friday Kortnightlies 
lust «eek was one of the most charming affairs of the season. 
It was an army cotillion, and the decorations of the hall 
were entirely military in character, consisting of bunting 
and arms artistically combined with flowers and greens, 
and the uniforms worn by the officers gave a finishing 
touch to the brilliancy of the scene. The cotillion was led 
by Lieutanants Noble and Dana Kilburn, who had com- 
plete control of the affair, and the first set was entirely of 
officers, with some of our prettiest belles in lovely gowns 
as their partners. Four figures were danced, the sabre 
figure being especially admired, and also seen for the first 
time. The attendance was very large, and the festivities 
prolonged until a later hour than usual at these parties. 
The lady managers have decided that the next dance of 
the club shall be a domino and mask affair. 

Another dance of Friday evening last was that of the 
Winter Cotillion Club at Beethoven Ball, when some orig- 
inal figures were introduced by the leader, Thos. P. Ross, 
who had Miss L S. Young for his partner. 

The domino party given last Saturday evening by Mrs. 
A. Hecht at the San Francisco Verein Club, for the dtbut 
of her daughter Edith, was also a success. The guests 
were received in the parlors of the club, and at 10 o'clock, 
each domino being provided with a small lighted lantern 
in the shape of a domino, marched to the ballroom, where 
dancing began, and the evening was one of great enjoy- 
ment. Supper was served at 12 o'clock, when dominos 
and masks were removed. Then followed more dancing, 
which was kept up till the morning light appeared. 

On Saturday afternoon Mrs. William Kohl gave a tea at 
the Palace Hoti purpose of introducing her new 

daughter-in-law, Mrs. Fred Kohl, to her friends. The 
Maple Ball, which was used for the occasion, was prettily 
decorated, a stringed orchestra was in attendance, and 
delicious refreshments were served. At the Berkshire 
Mrs. C. O. Scott gave a tea also, at which the recent 
bride. Mrs. W T Sesnon, was the guest of honor. 

Bow the wedding bells will chime next week' Every 
day nearly one or more splicings are named to take place. 
Tuesday has been selected by Miss Teen Goodall for her 
marriage to Bugo D. Keil, and the nuptial knot is to be 
tied at the Goodall residence on McAllister street. 
Wednesday, however, seems to be the favorite one, for on it 
will be celebrated the weddings of Miss Rose Eppinger 



and Dr. James Sharp at the home of the bride on Octavia 
street, of Miss Lizzie Carroll and Will Whittier, which will 
be solemnized at noon by Archbishop Riordan at the Car- 
roll residence on Van Ness avenue, and in the evening at 
the Hotel Colonial Miss Martha Shainwald and L. M. 
Myers will be the bride and groom. Miss Carroll has 
chosen the Misses Romietta Wallace and Julia Crocker to 
attend her as bridesmaids. Ber sister Gertrude will be 
maid of honor, and Milton Latham the groom's best man. 
Another wedding of next week will be that of Miss Mollie 
Torbert, one of San Francisco's greatest beauties and pet 
belles, to George Kirkpatrick, and, to the regret of her 
California friends, the ceremony will not take place here, 
but at the Church of All Angels in New York on Thursday 
evening, after which a dancing reception will be given at 
Sherry's by her sister, lovely Sheda Torbert, now Mrs. 
Valentine Snyder of New York. The month will close 
with the wedding of Miss Mollie Butchinson and Ernest 
Piexotto, which will be solemnized in New Orleans on 
the 31st. 

The wedding of Miss Agnes Smedberg and Max Rosen- 
field will be an event of the Eastertide, the first week in 
May having been decided upon as the date for its cele- 
bration. 

Next week will be a pet one with our fashionables, as it 
promises to be well filled up with gay doings. One of the 
leaders will be the reception which Mrs. Stanford is giving 
in honor of Bishop and Mrs. Newman at her magnificent 
home on California street, the first time the house has been 
opened for entertaining since the death of Senator Stan- 
ford. It will be an afternoon affair and on a very elaborate 
scale, the hours from 'A till 6 p. M., during which time it is 
safe to say all society will be seen. 

Paris appears to be the Mecca of Californians this win- 
ter. Among those there at a recent date were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Delmas, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Redding, 
Mrs. Crit Thornton, Mrs. Colton, Dr. and Mrs. 
Breyfogle, Miss Maud Boward, Mrs. George Loomis, 
Charley Felton and Mr. and Mrs. Ed Schmieden. 
We may soon expect to see the Scbmiedells, and in Chicago 
they will be joined by Miss Grace Martin, who is visiting 
friends there, and who will journey homeward with the 
Schmiedells. Mrs. Barry Bunt and Miss Bunt have re- 
turned from their trip to Japan. Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Bicks of Los Angeles are visiting Mrs. John S. Bofer at 
ber home on Gough street. 

The delightful Botel Rafael has long been considered the 
most fashionable winter and summer society resort of the 
Pacific Coast. It is only fifty minutes removed from San 
Francisco, and our best belles and beaux congregate there 
all the year round. Since Major Warfield, of the Califor- 
nia Botel, took personal charge of the Botel Rafael, it has 
become the Mecca of society folk, who look forward with 
anticipation to spending a few weeks, or even months, 
there. The climate of San Rafael is the healthiest on the 
Pacific Coast. 

Miss Rosamond O'Connell made her debut at the Grand 
Opera Bouse on Monday night in the melodrama, A 
the Stream, when she was cast as "Lively Mag," a small 
part, in which, however, the young dlbutante made a suc- 
cess. Miss O'Connell has a quality most important in an 
actress, perfect self-possession, clear enunciation, and the 
faculty of suiting the action to the word. She has a prom- 
ising career in the profession of her choice. 

Numerous invitations have been issued by the manage- 
ment of the Botel Mateo, at San Mateo, for a dance to be 
given at that fashionable place on Tuesday evening next. 
Great preparations have been made, and the leaders of 
our Four Hundred will assemble there to indulge in a few 
hours of solid happiness. 

Dr. Berzstein will leave the city on an extended vaca- 
tion next Sunday. He expects to be gone about five 
months, and besides visiting the leading cities in the East, 
will also take in London, Paris. Berlin and Vienna. 

Miss Carrie Lauer, daughter of Mr. Chas. H. Lauer, a 
prominent citizen of Eugene, Oregon, is visiting at the 
residence of Miss Friedlander, 2018 Buchanan street. 

Dr. William A. Bryant has returned from his trip to 
Tahiti, much improved in health. 



January 23, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1. 1:1 



»S 



AT THE RACES 



THE two weeks' meeting of the California Jock, 
at the pretty race track across the bay, has been an 
interesting one. from the number of fast races run and 
numerous sensational results. The sport has been clean 
and above the average. The talent has twice witnessed the 
defeat of the pride of the Burns >v Waterhouse stable. Mt. 
McGregor II., by Mr. Pursers liuckwa. Bucfcwa, by the 
way, never developed any stake quality, until imbued with 
our glorious climate, and its performances were truly won- 
derful, seeing that it was merelv a selling plater, around 
Milwaukee and Gravesend. California. Mr. Coulter's gocd 
mare, captured the Berkeley Handicao with the greatest 
of ease. Osric II. has bested Arrezzo in two battles roval. 
The son and daughter of Faverdale and Sweet Home 
battled for the Naglee Stakes. The impressive win of Mr. 
Purser's Scarf Pin, in the San Pablo Stakes, and the de- 
feat of the greatly advertised Flacon, by Queen Blazes, in 
the first two-year-old event of the season, were great 
happenings. The attendance has been away above the 
average. Next week Ingleside reopens for' two weeks, 
with every indication of being as successful as the preced- 
ing meet. 

Mr. Purser's Scarf Pin and Buckwa, who won their first 
starts in California, also won their first starts at Graves- 
end, N. Y. 

Mr. Dunne's Formal, who defeated Ferrier, Mr. Hobart's 
crack, ran fifth in the last Realization, which was won by 
Requital. 

Mr. Dunne's Preston, who won his first six races in 
California, also won the first race run at Sheephead Bay 
last season. 

Colonel Burns' Sweet Faverdale, full sister to Preston, 
won four races in the East, and was five times placed. 

Mr. Spreckels has a promising youngster in Boadicea. 
Blazes, the sire of Queen Blazes, also sired that good 
horse, Kamsin, a frequent winner in California. 

Mr. Hobart's crack, Bright Phoebus, the Realization 
winner of 1895, was left at the post in his first start this 
season. 

Out of the first 414 races run this season, favorites have 
won 201 times, second choices 104 times, and outsiders in 
the betting 109 times, a truly wonderful showing. The 
ten leading jockeys and number of wins are as follows: 
Jones, 79; H. Martin, 59; W. Martin, 30; Thorpe, 20; 
Isom, 19, Slaughter, 18; Murphy, 17; Shields, 11. 

The Brooklyn Handicap closed with thirty entries; the 
Suburban closed with forty-four entries. 

At the coming Ingleside meeting there will be three two- 
year-old races during the first week, viz., on Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday. On Wednesday there will be six 
races, all one mile or over. The Tarpey Stakes come off 
on January 30th; Hobart Stakes on February 6th, and 
the Ingleside, of four miles, on Washington's Birthday. 

S COURSE of three delightful and instructive lectures 
will be given by Professor David Starr Jordan, Rev. 
Chas. W. Wendte and Professor Charles Mills Gayley at 
Golden Gate Hall on the 28th inst., and February 4th and 
11th. These lectures will be given under the auspices of 
the Mercantile Library Auxiliary, and will undoubtedly 
be well attended. Tickets for the course, $1; admission 
for single lectures, 50 cents. The coupons may be used 
for one evening if desired. 

THE Cosmos Club will soon be located in the building 
formerly occupied by Miss Lake's School. The change 
is expected to take place about March 1st, and is being 
looked forward to with anticipation by all the members. 
The quarters will be most commodious, and, when fitted 
up, will be the most elegant club rooms in the city. 

The most eminent chemists have certified to the fact that Camel- 
line, the Queen of Complexion Beautifiers, is absolutely free from 
mercury, lead, and other poisonous matter. Hundreds of eminent 
ladies, such as Ellen Terry, Patti. Mrs. Kendal, and others, use it 
exclusively, and among our own fair sex it is an especial favorite. 
Camelline was originated by Wakelee & Co., our well-known druggists. 

The Rio Grande Western Railway and connections are offering 
low rates and superior accommodations to all points East. Before 
purchasing tickets, call at 14 Montgomery street. 

W. H. Snedaker, General Agent. 



Try Schilling' 1 i But tea. [f you don't like 

it, it costs you nothing — your grocer returns 
your money in full. 

Of course, this means that people in general 
like it. 

FINE FURS 

and 

SEALSKIN 

GARHENTS 

to order Remodeling and 
repairing nt prices Far be- 
low those of any other fur- 
rfi-r on the Pacillc Coast. 
All work guaranteed. 

AD. K0G0UR, 

FASHIONABLE FURRIER, 
Kearny Street (Up-stairs), 

Opposite Chronicle. Formerly cutler with Revillon Freres, ParlB, Lon- 
don. New York. 




5% 



Egyptian 
Enamel 



The most perfect beautifler the world has ever known; it 
instantly transforms the sallowest complexion into one of 
peerless beauty, and imparts the natural freshness and 
bloom of youth; it defies detection, will not rub off, lasts all 
day, and is perfectly harmless. Endorsed by prominent 
physicians Price, 50 cents and $1 : large size sent prepaid 
to any part of the United States or Canada on receipt of 
price. Manufactured only by 

131 POST STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



Mrs. M. J. Butler 



Gomet Oolong. 




The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 

Imperial flair Regenerator 

If you value your hair, use only the Imperial Hair 
Regenerator, to make GRAY HAIR its natural color, 
or BLEACHED HAIR any color desired. Baths do 
not affect it. Neither does curling or crimping, In- 
comparable for the BEARD on account of its durability 
and cleanliness. 

No. 1, Black; 2, Dark Brown; 3, Medium 
Brown; 4, Chestnut; 5, Light Chestnut 
6, Gold Blonde; 7, Ash Blonde. 

PRICE, $1 50 and $3 

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL M'F'G, CO, 



292 Flftn Ave., N. Y. 

For sale by Druggists and Hairdressers w.& 

in San Francisco; sold and applied by y£d_ 

Stanislas Strozynski and Goldstein & *fc** 




J D. SIMIVflN, 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



Dr. LEANER, 



Most skilled 



Chiropodist 



on the coast 

Manicure attendants. Corns, bunions, ingrowing nails, 
chilblains and warts extracted without pain by the New Treatment. 

Office, 708 Market St. Office hours: 9 a m. to 6 p. m. 
Sundays, 11 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sctenoes Building, 



819 Market street 



fjR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Office and Residence: 409V4 Post St., San Francisco. 
Office Hours : 9 to 13 A, m. ; 1 to 5 p. m. 



Dentist. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



W- KoSsj^Kj 




SHE AND I —james Bift/tr bensel. lover's year book Roberts)- 

AND I said, ".She is dead; I t^ould not brook 
Again on that marvelous face to look. " 

Hut they took my hand and they led me in, 
And left me alone with my nearest kin. 

1 >nce again in that silent place, 

My beautiful and I, face to face. 

And I could not speak, and I could not stir. 

But I stood, and with luve 1 looked on her. 

With love and with rapture and strange surprise 
I looked on the lips and the close-shut eyes ; 
On the perfect rest and the calm content 
And the happiness in her features blent, 

And the thin white hands that had wroughtso much. 

Now nerveless to kisses or fevered touch, — 

My beautiful dead who bad known the strife. 

The pain and the sorrow that we call life, 

Who had never faltered beneath her cross, 

Nor murmured when loss followed swift on loss. 

And the smile that sweetened her lips alway 

Lay light on her heaven-closed mouth that day. 

1 smoothed from her hair a silver thread, 

And 1 wept, but could not think her dead. 

I felt, with a wonder too deep for speech, 

She could tell what only the angels teach. 

And down over her mouth I leaned my ear. 

Lest there might be something I should not hear. 

Then out of the silence between us stole 

A message that reached to my inmost)soul. 
" Why weep you to-day who have wept before 

That the journey was roueh I must travel o'er? 
" Why mourn that my lips can answer you not 

When anguish and sorrow are both forgot? 
" Behold, all my life I have longed for rest,— 

Yea, e'en when I held you upun my breast. 
" And now that 1 lie in a breathless sleep. 

Instead of rejoicing you sigh and weep. 
" My dearest, I know that you would not break— 

If you could— ray slumber and have me wake. 
" For though life was full of the things that bless, 

I have never till now known happiness. 

Then I dried my tears, and with lifted head 
I left my mother, my beautiful dead , 



BALLAD OF BLIND LOVE.-andrew lang- 

Who have loved and ceased to love, forget 

That ever they loved in their lives, they say; 
Only remember the fever and fret. 

And the pain of love, that was all the pay; 

All the delight of him passes away 
From the hearts that hoped, and from lips that niet- 
Too late did 1 love you, my love, and yet 

I shall never forget to my dying day. 

Too late were we ware of the secret net 
That meshes the feet in the flowers that stray, 

There were we taken and snared, my pet, 
In the dungeon of " la /auue amttla;" 
Help there was none in the wide world's fray. 

Joy was there none in the gift and the debt ; 

Too late we knew it, too long regret— 
1 shall never forget to my dying day. 

We must live our lives, though the sun be set, 
Must meet in the masque where parts we play, 

Must cross in the mane of life's minuet; 
Our yea is yea, and our nay is nay : 
Bat while snows of winter, flowers of May 

Are the sad year's shroud or coronet, 

In the season of rose or of violet, 

I shall never forget to my dying day. 



Qjieen, when the clay is my coverlet, 

When 1 am dead, and when you are gray, 
Vow, when the grass of the grave is wet, 
'* I shall never forget to my dying day." 



BANKING. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 1862. 

Capital Paid Op, $3,000,00 Reserve Fund, $500,000. 

Southeast Cob. Bosh and Sansome Sts. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
lamo. and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland. Oregon; Sandon, B. C ; 
Kaslo, B. C „ . 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of tiie world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows; 

New York— Merchants' Bankof Canada; Chicago— FirstNational Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Sodtb America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
JAPAN— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company ol 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits {October 1, 1894).. 3.158,129 70 

WILLIAM ALVORD President 1 CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vtce-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAV Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bankof New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— T re mo nt National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bankof California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York. Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-ou-Maln, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm. ChrlBtiania. Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 



THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 



Capital., 



. .11,000,000 



Successor to Sather & Co.. Established 1851 4 5 la Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe. Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E. A. Bruguiere, F. W.Sumner, Albert Mil- 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V, H. Metcalf. James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— J. P Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bankof the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 



LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,500,000 | Paid UpCapital 12,000,000 

Reserve Fund 1850.000 

Head Off ice 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM \ ManaeerB 
C. ALTSCHUL I Managers. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK ° F SAN francisco. 

Cob. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-Up Capital 11,000,000. 

WM. H.CROCKER. President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. P. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Capital authorized 16,000.000 I Paid Up »1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 [ Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills 'or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART l Ma „ a „ firs 

P. N. LILIENTHAL f Mana e er8 

WELLS FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,260.000 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier I F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

^BRANCHES. 

NY. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. 1 Salt Lake Citv. J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, CharleB 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 



Jonu. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 



H 



THE WAV OF THE CROSS. 

ARK to the Matter'- . rtly calling: 

t'omr. fi>lli»w Mr 
O'er the dim monrlaml where the dews are falling, 

bill a. d lea. 
Forsake. f.>r If*, the dear, familiar ( 
Thy father', boose, thy i li. 'i-hed sheltert.l flares; 
'Hit In the atormj n-;- 
Far from the warmth and light, 
I have a Cross (,.r thee. 

• -for in the Bail the .lawn is breaking— 
Ami oome away ; 
My burden "n thy shoulders meekly taking. 
Nor even slay 
□ ore. through Minding tears, thy d< I 
To clasp, wilh bleedinir. breaking heart, thv Dearest, 

Hand, mutt unl e their hold, 

Kanh's joys grow faint anil cold— 
1 will be all 10 tine. 

Have I not trod life's bitter mail before thee 

With hleeilnif feet, 
Hearing alone the Cross that shineth o'er thee 

With message bs 
For thy sake have I wandered, fuint anil weary, 
Throtigh crowded city ways and deserts dreary. 
High on the mountain bare. 
Through the long nights of prayer 
Have I not thought of thee? 

When night is darkest ami the way seems longest, 

Tress onward, still 
Striving, in thickest tight where foes are strongest, 

To do My will. 
Look not behind thee to thy soul's undoing; 
Urge on thy footsteps— -'faint, yet still pursuing." 
When waves above thee close 
Whisper to me thy woes — 

Am 1 not near to thee? 

'Tis but a little while, and Ihen the dawning 

When I will come. 
In the bright sunrise of eternal morning, 

To call thee home. 
If thou hast followed me through gloom and sadness, 
Shall I not comfort thee with. joy and gladness? 
When life's dark days are o'er, 
There, on the shiniDg shore. 

I have a Crown for thee. Georoe Bing. 



OBITUARY. 



MB. MORAGHAN, who expired at his residence, 431 
, Ridley street, a few day asro, was one of San Fran- 
cisco's leading business men. He came to California in 
1865, and opened a restaurant in the California Market. 
His indomitable energy and enterprise caused him to suc- 
ceed, and he soon built up for himself a large and valuable 
business. He owned several large tracts of tide lands iD 
the neighborhood of San Bruno, and established there some 
of the best paying oyster beds in the country. His oys- 
ters are sought for everywhere, ard are the most luscious 
on the market. At the time of his death, Mr. Moraghan 
was 52 years of age. The funeral services were held at 
the Masonic Temple under the auspices of Excelsior Lodge, 
No. 166, of which the deceased was a member. 

Captain Thorn, who expired in Alameda, 
Captain Thorn, on the 16th inst., came to California in 

the days of '49, and followed the sea as 
a profession, as a captain of steamers, for many years. 
For a number of years he was captain of a ferry steamer 
on the broad-gauge line of the Southern Pacific Company, 
but retired from active service some years ago. The de- 
ceased will long be remembered for his genial disposition 
and many sterling qualities. 

The Overland Limited, 

ONLY 3% DAYS TO CHICAGO. \% DAYS TO NEW YORK. 

The Union Pacific is the only line running vestibuled Pullman 
Double Drawing-room Sleepers and Dining Cars daily. San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago without change. Vestibuled buffet smoking and 
library cars between Ogden and Chicago. Upholstered Pullman 
Sleepers, San Francisco to Chicago, without change, daily. Steam- 
Bhip tickets on sale to and from all points in Europe. For tickets 
and sleeping car reservations apply to D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

If you have not been to Leona Heights yet, you have missed one 
of the prettiest of excursions. Commodious cars run there from 
all parts of Oakland and Alameda. The round trip is only fifty 
cents and as there is no bar on tbe grounds no roughs ever resort 
there of a Sunday. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS GUIDE 



■ 

Bfrifi'i DMliuraM iill.llng. TO-.TM PlM ml tor 

lit.llr*. anil fitmll:. John llrrpri P 

Malton Tortont, I- .. Ill 0'F»'r«>ll ulrcel. Private dining 

'" i-rletor 

Poorll. Dog Restaurant, - .rani avn and Buiiti II Private 

I>1 <i> A 11 III .ANi'n * II URDU 

DAM 

Oakland Dairy Or, l.nely pure Milk and 

DKNTIBT8 

Dr. Thorns. L. Mill, 

OFFICE OddFsllowi Untitling, southtr-M cnr. Seventh anil Market 
Mreats Office hours : S a m tobp.u Oousnltatlon Hours: 4 to6. 

Dr. R. Cutlar. M|i Suiter mreol. 

MEDICAL. 

nlseases nf women and children. 



Or. Mall, l-l McAllr 



POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a Specialty. MAKINS 4 CO SOU Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place to world. W. F. OREANY. 8S7 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 1050'Farrell St.,S. F. 

i It MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, .til. .Tin, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description i csigncd and constructed. 

PRINTING AND RUBBER STAMPS. 
Koch & Harney, (Jas H. Harney. Geo. T Koch), Job Printers. 648 Sacra- 
mento St. Fine printing and embossing, seals, rubber stamps, stencils, etc 



Maitlard's Chocolates in 



CANDIES. 

. and I Ui boxes. 



Roberts', P( Ik and Bush. 



VEHICLES 
Second-hand Victoria, O'Brien & Son's pat. Spring Buggy, Surrey and 
Top Buggy, for sale cheap. 500 Golden Gate avenue. 

Try the SflN FRANCISCO LAUNDRY, 

Office, 33 Geaiy street. Telephone Main 5125. 
Oakland Office— 864 Broadway. Telephone Main 658. 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-Up Capital, 8300,000. 

OFFICERS 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President. I S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, 
and Joseph D. Granc. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Ranks. When opeuiDg accounis send signatuie. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1805 824,-»2,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 

Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by oheokof reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the aotual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the flrst deposit. No charge Is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. P. 

Capital aotually paid up In Cash, 91,000,000. Reserve Fund t 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31,1895 (30,727,586 59. Guaranteed Capital. .11,200,000 

DIRECTORS. 

B A . BECKE R President 

EDWARD KRUSE Vice-President 

DANIEL MEYER 2d Vice-President 

H. Horstman, Ign. Sleinhart, Nic Van Bergen, Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ 
D. N.Walter. 

~~ SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 

S. L. Abbott, Jr. 

O. D. Baldwin 

W. S. Jones 



William Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



H. H. Hewlett 
E J. McCutchen 
J. B. Lincoln 



28 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1897. 



"B' 



THE ART EPICUREAN. 

;TJT civilized man cannot live without cooks." Tut, 
tut, Lord Lytton! Let me whisper a word in your 
ear. If a San Francisco club man were cast away upon a 
desert island, with soft-shell crabs cuddling up and trying 
to be sociable while the close-mouthed oyster turned in its 
bed at the intruder, that particular civilized man could 
ive well without cooks, for, mark you, there are epicures 
in this city who can make a poem out of a ragout, a 
dream from a charing dish. He feeds, and feeds well, be- 
cause he dines understanding]}', an art which, to be mas- 
tered, must involve a knowledge of detail in preparation. 
It is not a rare occurrence for a clubman of San Francisco 
to go to his steward, take him aside and talk as earnestly 
to him as if he were a candidate buttonholing a politician 
during "the late unpleasantness. " The steward preserves 
a discreet, attentive look, and withal a respectful admira- 
tion, as who should say, "There's a man who understands 
the beauty of dining.'' And the club cheft — tbey fairly 
flutter with gratified pride when the sleek, rosy-eared, 
doubled-ehinned club man penetrates to their preserves 
and talks understandingly to them of sauces and simmer- 
ings. They have the soul of artists. Why even Joseph, 
the famous imported chefoi Vanderbilt, confided to a San 
Francisco man that all the Vanderbilt salary was no in- 
ducement for him to remain with the family because they 
did not understand eating, and could not appreciate his 
efforts; and so he folded up his little caps and aprons and 
took passage back to beloved Paris, where he might per- 
haps get francs where on this side he received dollars, but 
with the francs come appreciation, the line qua non of his 
artist soul, and he no longer pines in our uncongenial 
atmosphere. 

The "lean and hungry look" is not prevalent among the 
clubmen of this city; built instead are they like the jolly 
monks of the artists' pencil- wide of girth, not, indeed, 
like the ascetic brother, cadaverous and angular — fancy 
his knowing the difference between turbot and turtle, bur- 
gundy and beer! And this leads to a feminine deduction. 
The San Francisco club man is a contented biped. Why? 
He is often limited to single blessedness, yet he does not 
allow meditation upon his lonely lot to gnaw upon his 
damask cheek, or, Prometheus-like, give up his vitals for 
its delectation. He has a better use for this necessary 
portion of his being. Instead, he envelopes himself in a 
long apron, dons a cook's cap, and, with a bottle of U hon 
gout in one hand and a broiler in the other, bids.defiance 
to the blues, scoffs at sentiment and disperses d'oubtings 
by calling forth the genii of the lamp under the chafing 
dish. And speaking of chafing dishes, what a mine of won- 
ders culinary can be opened up by their manipulation! 

As witness to this, perhaps Mr. Frank J. Carolan, who 
guides the destinies of the inner man at the liurlingame 
Country Club, will forgive me for mentioning that, having 
caught him red-handed in the very act of revising the menu 
of the club, he was kind enough to give to the News Let- 
ter some of the possibilities lurking in that simple utensil. 
As to his own preference, he can cook California oysters 
in a dozen styles, any one of which would give him the 
cordon bleu in any well-regulated competition, while his 
lobster u /« Newbcrg cannot be excelled, and his sweet- 
breads are a feast for the gods. 

The sweetbreads arc allowed to simmer gently — note 
that point: the simmering is what brings out the best that 
is in a chafing-dish dainty— a bit of butter having been 
first melted for their reception, then scramble two or 
three fresh eggs, using a little tomato for flavoring and 
some chopped green peppers. A toupfon of good old 
Madeira to bring out the Savoring of the sweetbreads, and 
presto!— you have a dish that would tickle the pala 
the most blazl club man. Try it yourself, and see if it's 
not so. 

Perhaps you've been to a Bohemian Club high jinks and 
feel just a trifle frayed around the edges. The mere 
thought of a hearty breakfast is intolerable. It took 
Amedce Joullin's artistic soul to cope with the horns of 
that dilemma, and this is the breakfast that he and a kin- 
dred spirit discussed after a night of Bohemian revelry. 
Think of it— man, mere man, bad this dainty little poem of 
a breakfast, and yet 1 wot that woman would not appre- 
ciate it, for I have yet to see the woman gourmet. What 



to man is regarded as an important part of the day's pro- 
ceedings is too often somewhat beneath gentle woman's 
sovereign notice, and that's one reason why many women 
look so much older than their festive spouses — which is, I 
am aware, a slight digression from the subject in hand, but 
nevertheless a small excursion with a moral attached to 
it. Women do not as a general thing eat. They nibble. 
A bit here, a taste of this, a hasty drink of that, and they 
fancy, forsooth, that they have dined! But we were speak- 
ing of breakfast — not dinner. 

This debonair artist and his friend hied them to Mar- 
chand's and ordered a simple, two-course drjeuner of fluffy 
scrambled eggs, young quail on toast, with a bit of salad 
Romaine and a rum omelet to "top off." A modest bottle 
of Veuve Cliquot accompanied this little feast audeux, and 
enft noir completed it. Now a man who has wit and wis- 
dom to evolve a breakfast like that (for he could cook as 
well as order it) would make his fortune as a chef should he 
choose to lay aside pigments and palette — cater, instead, 
to the palate, as it were. But to return to our muttons: 
Some of the News Letter's readers are wondering how 
that salad was made. Simplest thing in the world. For 
their benefit I prostrated myself, pencil in hand, before 
his superior knowledge, and came forth with the precious 
information. The Romaine leaf, be it clearly understood, 
is not the ordinary choux lettuce, but the long, crisp, nar- 
row-leafed vegetable, and the leaves should never be intro- 
duced to a knife. Chicory, en passant it might be said, is 
the chrvsanthemum-like lettuce, and should never be used 
alone, as then it is bitter. This salad Romaine takes a 
French dressing of three tablespoonfuls of oil and one of 
vinegar, slowly blended, with black pepper and salt to 
taste. If you value your happiness, use no parsley, says 
Mr. Joullin. If you wish a delicate seasoning for a salad 
or sniitf, use fins herbs, or astrigen, siboulletes, (a long, 
grass-like herb), chopped fine. Garlic he eschews, using 
in its stead the more delicate eschollets. But' if these are 
to be our salad days, there will not be space for a descrip- 
tion of his pet concoction, the one upon which he stakes 
his reputation as an artist (of the cuisine) — an asparagus 
omelet. It is such a simple affair, and yet so easily 
spoiled, for the young asparagus must be boiled only until 
the ends are nearly soft — just on the point of being cooked. 
Then have the well-beaten eggs ready to pour into the hot 
receptacle, in which a piece of butter is browning; cut the 
ends of the asparagus off, turn the eggs into the pan over 
a brisk fire, throw into it the asparagus tips, and let the 
fire and an alert eye do the rest. Salt and pepper, but as 
you value the success of the dish, no other seasoning, else 
away with that delicate asparagus flavor that enters so 
largely into the triumphant whole. Try that, ye whose 
husband is a confirmed dyspeptic, and if you work con 
amore, the result will cause hubby's "indigestion, thatcon- 
i science of every bad stomach," to take his grip and leave. 
But time presses, newspaper columns are not elastic, and 
so I must leave a delicious terrapin concoction, confided by 
a Maryland man (now a Pacific-Union Clubman) for another 
chapter, as also a delicious salad recipe brought from the 
Cafe de la Paix by a gentleman who is authority on mat- 
ters epicurean. Some of the dishes forming the menu of 
the inaugural dinner given to our new Mayor must also be 
described next time, and in the meantime polish up your 
chafing-dishes and practice on your pet achievements, for 
it's quite the fad in San Francisco now. 

Amy L. Wells, 



Kelly's Corn Cure never fails. 25 cents. 103 Eddy street. 

Lamp-chimney sellers can't 
give you the shape for your 
lamp, without the Index. They 
have it ; but some don't cart-. 
Let us send you one ; free. 

"Pearl top" and "pearl 
t^lass " are trade-mark names 
lor tough glass and fine work. 
Geo A Macbeth Co 

Pittsburgh Pa 



per Copy. 10 < 




Annuo ,on, $4.00. 



*h* ™a* c »«co 




(&txlif jmuOfttarti sex. 




Vol. L IV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 30. 1897. 



Number 5. 



Printed and Publiehed every Saturday Oy He proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
5H AVamy etreet. San Frantuco. Entered at San Francieeo 
office a* Second-ctaee Matter. 

The office of the NBW8 LKTTSR in „W,r Tort t_Vy U at Temple Court; 
and at Vhicago, 901 Boyce Ruil.liog. {Frank E MorrUon. Ea/lern 
Rcpretentalirt), where information maybe obtained regarding tiibecrip- 
tion and advertising rati*. 

IT is admitted that many of our laws are virtually a dead- 
letter, but yet many members of the Legislature seem 
to act upon the theory that the remedy for this is more 
laws. 

FREE wool and lessened duties on woolen goods have 
given the people cheaper clothing than they ever had 
before. There are fifty persons benefited by free wool to 
one who could profit by duties on foreign wool. 

WRECKS in Golden Gate may be expected next month. 
The pilots are obliged to keep an eye on the State 
Capitol until the adjournment of the Legislature. With 
their watchfulness thus divided, shipping may come to 
grief. 

IF the School Board of this city would cut off all unneces- 
sary expenses, in the way of special teachers and the 
like, there would be money enough to pay the regular 
teachers and to keep the schools open the usual number of 
months in the year. 

IT IS to be regretted that prize-fighting is looked upon 
with so much favor in Nevada that a bill has been 
passed permitting such brutal exhibitions. This low form 
of sport has been denounced from one end of the country 
to the other, and it is now in order to strike this most 
disreputable of States from the roll of the Union. 

THERE is no better body of men in the Government 
service than our letter carriers. They work diligently 
and faithfully by day and by night, and are trustworthy 
and painstaking in fulfilling their arduous duties. We hope 
that Congress will recognize their services, and will vote 
favorably on the bill introduced for the purpose of grant- 
ing them better pay. 

A STOCK subject with the pulpit is that of the relation 
between the rich and the poor. The preachers gen- 
erally condemn lavish expenditures for fashionable amuse- 
ments, such as fancy dress balls, but forget that these 
outlays afford much needed employment to the poor. If 
the rich should stop spending money on superfluities, many 
thousands of hands would be deprived of the means of earn- 
ing bread. 

GREAT preparations are being made for our coming 
Carnival, and it behooves all persons to help it along 
to the best of their ability. With such an attraction vis- 
itors will come here from all over the country. Some of 
them may be prevailed upon to stay here, and many may 
have to. Money will be spent in all directions, and all Cali- 
fornia will benefit in one way or another. 

THE so-called "delights of winter" in the East are for 
the well-to-do, who have abundance of food and 
clothing, comfortably-warmed dwellings, and leisure for 
skating, sleigh-riding and other recreations peculiar to the 
season. But to the needy the cold weather brings the 
most cruel and bitter suffering, usually intensified by the 
lack of sufficient food and fuel. We have in California 
people whom we call poor, but their condition is luxurious 
compared with that of the Eastern poor. 



INSTEAD of wasting money on marble wains, (.ting for 
the mile and a half of corridors in the City Hall'. 
missioners should see that the floors are kept in decent 
condition and the passageways sufficiently lighted to en- 
able people to find their way from one door to another. 

THE English used to think the Irish question a tremen- 
dous bore, but now they groan in spirit over three 
Irish questions— financial reform, the demand for a Catho- 
lic University for Ireland, and the proposed Boaidof Agri- 
culture. The green island may be relied upon to always 
keep Parliament in subjects for debate. 

THE bill requiring the employment of a "specialist in 
sociological education," in all counties having a school 
attendance of 25,11011, is one of the most preDosterous 
measures ever introduced in the California Legislature, 
"tt e might as well have specialists in psychology, penology, 
pathology, or embryology grafted upon our common school 
system. The cranks should be taught to keep their hands 
off the school moneys. 

OVER in Alameda County a meddlesome Grand Jury is 
investigating the expenditure of nineteen thousand 
dollars last year, by the Supervisors, for the support of 
persons alleged to be indigent. The circumstance that it 
was a Presidential year makes this outlay particularly 
exasperating to the tax-payers. It should now be in or- 
der to make the indigent do something for the relief of the 
property owners. 

IP reports from Chicago be true, there are vastly more 
people carrying revolvers in that city than the number 
of those so armed on all the Pacific Coast. The robber 
and the foot-pad make life a series of alarms for the 
money handlers of the big city by the lake. Despite all 
sensational statements to the contrary, the truth is that 
in no other large city of the United States are life and 
property more secure than in San Francisco. 

IT is said that Emperor William regrets the policy of 
conciliation that he formerly displayed towards the 
German socialists, and that he has decided upon repres- 
sive measures. He is surrounded by flatterers, who en- 
courage his disposition towards absolutism. But there 
are millions of socialists, and in some large cities they 
compose three-fifths of the voting population. The Em- 
peror may find that holding down the safety valve of Ger- 
man discontent is not altogether safe. 



THERE is a growing belief that our political system 
puts too much power in the hands of the President. 
In England, under what is termed a constitutional mon- 
archy, Parliament is omnipotent, and the people actually 
rule, through their chosen representatives. Here the 
President often defies Congress and nullifies its acts, not 
infrequently when he is in opposition to undoubted public 
sentiment. The Constitution should be amended, so as to 
give Congress more control of national affairs. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S debt is less than a quarter of a 
million, while that of New York is $110,000,000, and 
Boston's is $43,000,000. Among the principal cities of the 
United States, this is distinguished for having the smallest 
debt, both absolute and per capita. And only New York 
and Boston excel this city in the amount of wealth. Free- 
dom from debt is a good thing, but yet we could well afford 
to issue bonds for sewers and other needed public improve- 
ments, so as to give posterity a just share of the burden 
of payment. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 



DIVORCES THAT DISGRACE THE COURTS. 

MRS. WATSON of Alameda is now free to do as she 
pleases, and among the things it is sworn that she 
pleased to do, was to flirt with street car conductors and, 
in the absence of her husband, to receive male visitors that 
she knew to be objectionable to him. Mr. Watson, be- 
cause he loved, not wisely, but too well, very naturally 
expressed his disapproval of conduct unbecoming in the 
wife of his bosom and the mother of his children. He 
owned a desirable residence, supplied it bountifully, was a 
kind father, and appears to have been an indulgent hus- 
band in all things save his wife's flirtations. He could 
bear much, but smirks, and smiles, and nods that are as 
good as winks to passing car conductors, he could not stand 
without remonstrance. Nor did he quite like certain 
pastoral visits that were always made when he was away 
from home. Weller Senr. gave his son Sam the very ex- 
cellent advice to "bevare of the vidders, Samivell" In 
view of the record San Francisco, and its environs, have 
made during recent years. Mr. Watson was rather wise 
than foolish in applying old Weller's caution to pastor's 
visits. It is all very well for reverend gentlemen to take 
an interest in the immortal souls of other men's wives, but 
it is no less well for them to consider the souls of the hus- 
bands, just a little bit. Moreover, every man is. or of 
right ought to be, lord of his own castle, and entitled to 
say who may, and who may not darken its portals. A 
good wife would no more think of disregarding the wishes 
of her husband in such a matter, than the average man 
thinks of introducing women into his home, who with or 
without cause, are known to be obnoxious to his wife. It 
is a matter in which each should, not grudgingly or re- 
luctantly, but cheerfully, yield to the other. That clergy- 
man best does his duty who most faithfully, and by exam- 
ple as well as precept, respects and sustains the authority 
of the head of the family. He of all men should bow to 
that authority, and when he does not, but rebels, and be- 
comes a partizan in a divorce court, and helps to separate 
"whom God hath joined together,'' he forgets himself and 
his duty to society. Because Mr. Watson objected to the 
things we have indicated, he was declared "jealous" by 
his wife, and that by an extraordinary decision of an ex- 
traordinary Judge was held to be "extreme cruelty,'' 
entitling the woman to a divorce. Whoever heard, in real 
life, of the jealousy of the man she loves being a cause of 
"great mental anguish" to a woman? What if her flirting. 
or worse, failed to arouse any feeling in him at all, would 
he not by his indifference, cause her real mental distress? 
Would it not pain any true woman to think that her spouse 
had wearied of her and was incapable of exhibiting jeal- 
ousy over her actions, and treating her with indifference ? 
Not a doubt about it. Indeed, it is by no means an un- 
common thing for wives who fear that the affections of 
their husbands are waning, to test the matter by what 
is called an "innocent flirtation." Jealousy, under such 
circumstances, is the Bincerest form of flattery, and very 
dear to the female heart. Its absence would be taken, in 
such a case, to be downright cruelty. To declare that 
jealousy which a loving husband naturally feels when he 
sees his wife flirting with other men to be "extreme 
cruelty." is a monstrous misinterpretation of the statute 
and an outrage upon common sense. 

Mr. Watson, because he was jealous— that is, because 
he loved his wife — is punished. How, and to what extent? 
By a Judge, apparently afflicted with a sort of mental 
strabismus. be is decreed to be "a cruel'' husband, an un- 
worthy guardian of his children, and a man to be stripped 
of his past savings, as well as of his future earnings. 
Robbed of his wife, his children, his home, his housi 
goods and virtually held in slavery by a monthly payment 
of alimony, he has had taken from him pretty Dearly a 
renders life worth living. Al 

without a trial by a jury of his countrymen, and, indeed, 
without an adequate trial of any kind. Three or four 
short sittings, at which the wife tells anv story she p 
and at which every little domestic molehill is e 
into a mountain, do not constitute a judi. gation 

commensurate to the terrible consequences involved. No 
wonder that many thoughtful men are beginning to think 
that the time will come when the institution of marriage 
will fall into a state of innocuous desuetude. 



The Slaying The life and doings in this city of Fung 
of Ching, better known as Little Pete, who 

"Little Pete." was killed by two of his countrymen 
whilst he was sitting in a barber's chair 
in Chinatown on Saturday last, constitute one of the 
blackest pages in our municipal history. For pretty well 
twenty years he defied law and order, secured the protec- 
tion of the police by processes easier understood than 
described, profited by owning opium joints, gambling dens, 
slave women, man murderers, smuggling outfits, alarm 
gongs connecting police quarters with Chinatown, and 
heaven only knows what other infamous and lawless de- 
vices. He was cunning, secretive, rich, powerful, and the 
embodiment of about all the ways that were dark 
and tricks that were vain, of his own countrymen. He 
could raise a corruption fund in quick order, and for 
almost any amount. He believed that the Police Depart- 
ment was constituted as well as it could be. and he could 
always be relied upon to promptly raise any required sum 
to help it pass pension bills, secure court decisions that 
passed all understanding, to elect certain local candidates 
to office, and generally to further whatever he deemed the 
common cause. We may not say, because we cannot 
prove, that these contributions brought him the immunity 
he so long enjoyed. We have never had a Lexow Com- 
mittee for this city, and therefore have never got to the 
bottom of things. But the broad fact stands out clear and 
bold enough for a wayfaring man, though a fool, to read. 
Little Pete was known for pretty nearly all he was, yet 
no harm came to him at the hands of our vigilant peace 
officers, and he was rarely put to any inconvenience, but 
when he was he always seemed to have a friend just where 
he needed one. It may have been that his smartness and 
cunning were too much for our officials, but to admit that 
is to concede the point that we ought long ago to have had 
a band of trained officers equal to at least one Chinaman. 

What this city has first and last suffered, and still suf- 
fers, from the presence of Chinatown in its midst, may 
never be computed. It has been a festering cesspool of 
crime, disease, immorality, unmentionable vices, and of 
contamination to both old and young alike, that almost 
passeth human understanding. The infection is to-day 
deeply embedded in persons and places that are not gen- 
erally suspected. No one who came into contact with 
Chinatown seemed to escape its infection. Even its women 
missionaries, in too many cases, surrendered to its habits 
with truly lamentable results. It is not too much to say 
that the long-continued existence of this abomination has 
in large part been due to the corrupt and corrupting in- 
fluences of which this man, Little Pete, was so pronounced 
a master. Of course corruption existed before his day, 
and will continue now that he is dead, but he had made 
himself the Deutex machina, and leaves no equally danger- 
ous leader behind. If Grand Juries, District Attorneys, 
Police Judges, and vigilant reporters will keep a keen eye 
on Chinatown for a while, it may be possible to prevent 
the renewal of the alliances which Little Pete found so 
potent for evil. That such a rascally Chinaman could have 
worked the mischief and secured the immunity he did, 
must seem incredible to strangers who do not know the 
facts. This citv has no cause to mourn the death of Little 
Pete. 

What Is The It may safely be taken for granted that 
Examiner the Examiner's raid upon the Park Com- 
After Now ? missioners is not what it seems to be. 
There is a nigger in the wood pile some- 
where. We do not pretend to know exactly what the 
facts are, but we known the Examiner and the "methods it 
adopts under its present editorial management. It has a 
design upon the Park, and it cannot be a good one, be- 
the present e.\ I commissioners are deemed to 

be in the way. They are not usable men, and, in conse- 
quence, a sudden and very extraordinary effort is being 
made to get rid of them. Why? Cau anybody tell? 
There is no salary attached to their offices, and nobody is 
likely to hanker after their positions on that account. 
If Irving M. Scott, John Rosenfeldt, and Joseph Austin are 
not men whom no breath of scandal can hurt, then this 
municipality is without citizens above fear and beyond re- 
proach. The condition of the Park speaks for itself. It 
larvel to every body, and especially to visitors from 



January 30. 1897. 



LETTER. 



other States, that so much is .1 . moderate 

an expense. It is compla 

ts a full da-, for a 

The awful ch thml he 

sometimes borrows ideas from his suhordina 1 
allegations, 

:' the competency superinten- 

dent as need be desired. It is further claimed tbi 
Lodge in which he is housed is needlessly permanent and 
costly. He necessarily has to live in the quarters assigned 
him by the Commissioners, and thev and not be are res- 
ponsible. The late W. \V. Stow favored the buildfa 
Lodge that should be a credit to the Park for all time. 
he approved the plans, and watched all the proceedings 
had in connection with it with personal care Possessed of 
personal integrity never questioned, and of a judgment in 
such) matters almost infallible, no well informed citizen 
will care to question the wisdom, at the men' ipt, .h'.rit of 
the Examiner, of what he chose to do as a Park Commis- 
sioner. Independent in mind and means, he made a hobby 
of improving the Park, and left our whole people indebted 
to him for his resultful labors. Then the audacious allega- 
tion is made that Irving M. Scott, in effect, stole $5,000 
from the Park funds by collecting that much more for 
pumping apparatus than it was worth. Pshaw! Every- 
body knows that Mr. Scott would rather donate that 
amount to the Park than take one dime from it to which 
he was not entitled. Mr. Scott has not time to go mous- 
ing around on little looting expeditions, but he may find 
time to defend his honor, by forcing the Examiner into 
the position of admitting that it cannot prove its words. 
It would not be true to its record if it did not take water, 
beg for mercy, and whine like a whipped cur. Stewart 
Menzies, of all men, was said to be in a steal by which he 
became possessed of the Casino building at much less than 
its value and it was intimated that McLaren had built a 
road at public expense for Menzie's private benefit. A 
brief explanation sufficed to put these lies at rest, but 
they have not been withdrawn. It is no doubt hoped 
that the Commissioners may be badgered into resigning 
their positions in disgust, but that would be to play the 
game of the enemy. The Examiner has a design, and its 
methods demonstrate that it is not a good one. 

Railroad Is the era of railroad building approaching an 
Building end? The Railway Age finds that it has under- 
in 1896. gone a remarkable decline since 1887, in which 
year 12,983 miles of track were laid. Year 
by year fewer miles have been built, until last year the 
small total of 1802 miles was reached. The descent to ex- 
treme inactivity has been continuous throughout nine years, 
and it is perhaps well. The country has fully enough 
miles of road to supply the requirements of its present 
population. As a matter of fact, the United States has 
come by the greatest system of railroads on earth, it 
hardly knows how. A sum total nearly equal to all the 
gold and silver in the world has been borrowed to give us 
nearly as many miles of railroad as are owned by all the 
rest of creation put together. This gigantic business is 
to-day paying nothing on 70 per cent of its stock indebted- 
ness, and nothing on 13 per cent of its bonds. Yet what 
would our country have been, for a century or more to 
come, if it had not been for the early building of these 
roads, for which there has been need, and for which there 
will yet be adequate profit? That the credit of so new a 
country was equal to what has been accomplished will al- 
ways remain one of the marvels of the age. Meanwhile, 
the railroad builder may well take a rest. Yet he is still 
busy in California, which last year headed the list of States 
in the matter of mileage of new roads. 

The Proposed Bills have passed the House of Repre- 
Postal sentatives which contain changes in the 

Improvements, postal service which will be interesting 
to the people generally. One is to per- 
mit the mailing of private postal cards. Under its pro- 
visions any card to which a one-cent stamp is affixed may 
be transmitted by mail, provided it approximates in size 
and weight the present card furnished by the Government. 
The plan has been adopted in Great Britain, and in seven 
■months has increased the card mail by one-fourth; a very 
strong evidence of its popularity there. It would un- 



ild use 

it. pi 

g individual cords 1 
cntfr.. nt would profit DJ 

lling and storing an 111,1 
numi 

Another proposal is thai 

• may In' Indemnified lO the amount 

of ten dollars. J tered undei ten dollars, if lost, 

would be repaid in full Probably the majority of pi 
who patronise the Registry department believe that the 
Government is responsible for the money thus sent 

by mail. Such is not the fact. The additional eight 
cents on a registered letter purchases nothing but 
extra care in its transmission. Registered letters are 

handled separately from the ordinary mail and can 
be traced from sender to receiver, but the mere fact 
of registration points the evilly-inclined to the letters 
wlure the most value is to be found. Under the plan of a 
limited indemnification it is expected that the increased 
use of registry will be sufficient to make the department 
whole against any sums it may be called upon to repay. 

The postal authorities are also experimenting with a 
plan which makes the individual his own postmaster. If 
approved, a little cabinet, costing about two dollars, may 
be purchased from the department and fastened on 
one's front door. The cabinet will have one compartment 
in which the carrier will place letters which he is deliver- 
ing; another in which he will find letters to be mailed. If 
the householder has no stamps, he may put the money to 
buy them in the box with the letters, and the carrier will 
do the rest. Still another compartment is for the purpose 
of buying stamps. Money is placed in the box, and an in- 
dicator tells the carrier just what stamps are required. 
He takes the money and leaves the stamps on his succeed- 
ing trip. The amount that can be purchased at any one 
time will not exceed fifty cents. Soon a man may not need 
to leave his house for any purpose, and later on, perhaps, 
be may be served with all necessities while in bed. 

The Arbitration Treaty It is obvious that the arbitration 
in Danger. treaty is in imminent peril. The 

small men whom the poor politics 
of the period have brought to the surface as United States 
Senators, are beating the bush for all sort of excuses for 
delay and its ultimate defeat. It is now in committee and 
is not apparently to be reported back to the Senate this 
session. Meanwhile, the Irish societies all over the 
country are being moved to petition for its rejection on all 
sorts of grounds, most of which go straight to the point 
that it is not desirable that this country should be without 
grievances against Great Britain, or debarred from mak- 
ing war against the people of that nation whenever popu- 
lar clamor can be aroused to demand it, or their European 
complications seem to afford us the usual opportunity for 
successful attack. That is plainly the intent and meaning 
of an avalanche of memorials now descending upon the 
Senate, which, by its non-action, seems to invite them, 
and to desire nothing better. If this issue is unhappily to 
be raised at all, it is better that it should be raised now 
than later. Let us comprehend, once for all, just where 
we stand. If we are to live in a condition of perpetual un- 
rest and threatening turmoil with the people of our own 
race, kindred and language across the ocean, let us know 
it, and learn at whose instance, and for what cause this 
unsatisfactory state of affairs is to be maintained. The 
News Letter has no taste for religious, or racial contro- 
versies, and usually leaves them severely alone. It be- 
lieves that the newer and better issues constantly arising 
in this great country supply all the food for thought that 
our people require or can digest. Our domestic difficulties 
are enough in all conscience, without participating in for- 
eign antipathies in which we have no sort of inter- 
est. If any section, race, or creed, less than a majority 
of the whole American people, believes that it can force 
the United States to maintain a standing army, and a Navy 
of the first class, in order to fight causeless and prevent- 
able wars, we believe that it has but to show its hand in 
order to learn how grievously mistaken it is. The arbi- 
tration treats' is a beneficent measure, approved by the 
best American thought, and demanded by enlightened 
public sentiment. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 



The Pacific Railroad The best journals of the East are 
Debts. most pronounced in their views of 

the unwisdom of Congress in not 
either passing the Funding Bill or devising some satisfac- 
tory settlement of the Pacific Railroad debts. The New 
York Nation, and Springlield Republican, fairly represent 
the independent class of newspapers to which we refer. 
The Nation in its own clear and forceful way says, that 
"in lieu of funding, foreclosure is the ocly remaining alter- 
native. Gut that would imply, in the first place, an 
issue of $60,000,000 in bonds with which to pay off the first 
mortgage, and, in the second place, Government owner- 
ship and operation of the road. But we all know how very 
bad it is to issue bonds, and we can guess how bad it would 
be for a Government to run a railroad. It is perfectly 
certain that every prominent constituent would have to 
have a pass, and a position on the road for his son, and get 
his freight carried free. CoDgress can seriously contem- 
plate neither bond issues on account of the road, nor its 
operation by the Government. The only inference is that 
it has shirked, and means to go on shirking its duty to 
settle the question. It is the same old policy of drift. 
Drifting is good fun and very easy, but in the end the ship 
goes to smash on the rocks. However, you may always 
hope to be dead and well out of it first. " That is pretty 
much the view the News Letter has always taken of 
this matter. The trouble is that funding involves a com- 
plicated financial transaction for which Congress at pre- 
sent has neither a mind or taste of its own, and is without 
confidence in anybody who has. Then there is an enviable 
opportunity to pose in public as an enemy of corporations 
and bloodsuckers. Add to this, the inertia and cowardice 
of a short session on the eve of a new administration, and 
the shirking by Congress of a difficult and perhaps un- 
popular duty, is fully accounted for. But the Pacific Rail- 
roads' debt problem has got to be solved in some way, and 
that way will not be found by the Government embarking 
in the railroad business. Meanwhile, foreclosure proceed- 
ings will drag their slow way along in the Courts, and the 
end no man may foresee. It will be well if no paralysis falls 
upon the commerce of this Coast in consequence. 



Renewed Interest The English are now engaged in ex- 
in periments that have a decided inter- 

Ramie Fibre. est for the textile trade everywhere. 
Every reader will remember the in- 
cessant talk in the papers a few years since, regarding 
the value of the ramie fibre, and how confidently it was 
expected to become a serious rival of both cotton and flax. 
The French worked on ramie before the Americans took 
it up. The French gave it up, and even the ingenuity of 
Americans failed, and the subject dropped. Now the 
English have the ramie fever, and already claim that suc- 
cess is just ahead. The great difficulty to overcome in the 
preparation of the fibre is to disengage it from the gummy 
bark of the plant. The method is necessarily a chemical 
one, and both French and Americans failed to find an 
agent that would dissolve the gum without weakening the 
fibre. There has been no trouble to separate the fibre, 
but it was always found too much rotted by chemicals 
to use in cloth. The English are using a method employ- 
ing the zincate of soda, lately originated for them by a 
chemist of Indian nativity. A company has been formed, 
and patents taken out in every country. An experi- 
mental factory is at work in London, turning out two tons 
of fibre a week ready for spinning. There has never 
seemed any doubt of the value of ramie, provided it could 
be successfully decorticated. It is a very light and very- 
strong cloth when woven, and will not shrink or stretch. 
It c;m be sold almost as cheap as the cheapest cottoi 
yet its smooth and glossy appearance rivals linen. Six 
pounds of ramie will make as much sail-cloth as ten pounds 
of flax. The canvas of the famous yacht Defender was 
made from this fibre. The plant is tropical, and has been 
known to produce four crops a year. If the claims 

are well founded, we shall doubtless see the enterprise 
founded in this country. Texas is known to I 
lent climate for the production of the plant, and Southern 
California may prove to be just as good. All that the 
planter has to guard against is the fermentation of the 
gum in the bark before he delivers it to the fan 



The Cabinet The indications are that President-elect 
Taking Form. McKinley is at last progressing with his 
cabinet making. As John Sherman has 
himself announced the fact, there remains no doubt that 
he is to be the new Secretary of State. A stronger man 
than his chief, he will, we think, be the guiding star of, 
and give complexion to the new administration. And a 
very quiet, sober, sedate hue it will be. For many years 
past John Sherman has been the most temporizing, con- 
servative man in Congress. He will carry nothing of 
jingo policy into our relations with foreign nations, and 
that is weil, for the country needs nothing so much at this 
time as assurances of peace, to the end that prosperity 
mav be permitted to resume its normal sway. The new 
Secretary will be quiet, dignified and inclined to smooth 
away difficulties and the President-elect, not being a 
Cleveland, will give him a free hand and let him have his 
own way. Unless the unexpected should happen, our 
foreign relations will not trouble us overmuch during the 
next four years. Judge Nathan Goff, of West Virginia, is 
to be the Attorney General, and he too. is a safe, rather 
than a brilliant man. Our own Judge McKenna appears 
to have been slated for Secretary of the Interior. In him 
California will have a creditable representative, and the 
country a most painstaking and conscientious cabinet 
officer. Probably no better selection from this Coast 
could have been made. He will devote himself to master- 
ing the affairs of his office, and will administer them with 
marked executive ability. The leading idea which seems 
to have dictated these cabinet selections, is that strength 
and solidity, rather than brilliancy, should form the dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of this administration. Political 
pyrotechnics are likely to be at a discount for some time 
to come. 

An Outline Of What may be accepted as an accurate 
McKiniey's Policy, statement of the main features of the 
next administration's financial policy 
appears over the signature of E. V. Smalleyof Minneapolis, 
who has been having a talk with the President-elect. 
There will be: (1) An immediate revision of the tariff on 
protection lines, (2) The restoration of the reciprocity 
treaties of the Harrison administration, (3) The mainten- 
ance of all kinds of money at a parity with gold, (4) 
Efforts in the direction of promoting international bi- 
metallism, (5) The gradual retirement of the greenbacks 
by the use of surplus revenue for that purpose, (6) An ex- 
tension of the National Bank system, so as to permit of 
branches being carried on in small towns, (7) Economy in 
expenditures, if Congress will permit, to correspond with 
the economies of the period consequent upon the condition 
of the times. This is a modest programme that has little 
or no meaning in it, except as to the tariff. The restora- 
tion of the reciprocity arrangements is now next to im- 
possible, for the reason that nothing is left to trade with. 
The sugar duties cannot again be spared; besides our cane 
and beet growers would object to free trade in sugar, and 
bounties are now impossible. The greenback policy will 
have no immediate effect, as it will be long before there 
will be any surplus revenue to speak of. The old McKinley 
tariff with a few changes will be re-enacted, and an extra 
session called for the purpose. This is due to the indus- 
tries that supplied the campaign fund. For the rest the 
programme amounts to nothing, and that, perhaps, is well. 
The country, with a rest from politics, will stick the better 
to business. 

To Inconvenience A Bill is at present before the Legis- 
The Pub ic. lature, the tenor of which is to com- 

pel the Pullman Company to leave up 
all upper berths when the same are not occupied. This 
bill is one of the worst to crop up this session and if 
passed would prove a L'reat inconvenience to passengers 
and deprive them of the little comfort they may obtain 
while travelling. At present it is customary to sell the 
lower berths first and if the upper berth remains unsold 
the passenger has the privilege and comfort of both seats. 
Should this bill pass, however, it will be to the advantage 
of the Pullman Company to sell both berths in the section 
before selling a second lower berth in another compartment. 
The bill is ridiculous, and would only inconvenience the 
travelling public. For this reason it "should be killed. 



Januaiy 30, 1897. 






AT THE CAPITOL. 

1 ^ro. January ! 

WITH near andbalf 

the session .. most over, how in the world I 
:i is going to get rid of tl 
is a problem thai is difiii 

the c|uestion that all the measures can lx> pn 
sidered. Then. again, there is beh 
desire to shirk work. Adjournments are tak' 
the afternoon of each day. and in both 1 
lunged members waste much time, as Dennery Bald, 
"chewing the rag." But let the taxpayers be thankful 
that the Legislature meets only once in two veai- 
that the session is only sixty days in length, and that only 
thirty-five days yet remain. The business of the ses 
I prophesy, will be able to be summed up in the Stat 
that the General Appropriation Rill and another County 
Government act have bpen passed. By the way, the Ap- 
propriation bill is practically ready now. 

The sensational scene in the Assembly last week, when 
Chief Clerk Duckworth fainted, is still being talked about, 
and may prove the salvation of Duckworth's future. 1 Ion 
servative members think now that he was not all to blame. 
and the investigating committee, in whose hands the matter 
now is. will undoubtedly implicate several members of the 
Assembly along with the Chief Clerk. The punishment in 
store for them will probably be a reprimand and advice to 
not do it again. A bill fixing the number, duties, and pay 
of all temporary and permanent attackis will also be passed, 
or rather a constitutional amendment for the offices of 
both houses are named by constitutional provision. As- 
semblyman Brieling, Chairman of the Committee on 
Attaches and Mileage, was before the Investigating Com- 
mittee the other day, and if he is as innocent a young man 
as his testimony would tend to show, Alameda County is a 
fit temporary residing place, and heaven should be his 
permanent home. The poor fellow knew nothing except 
what he was told, was suspicious of nothing, took every- 
thing for granted, and let a list of over one hundred 
names, with an appropriation of nearly $4,000, go through 
with his recommendation, simply because he thought it 
was regular. The Lord deliver us soon, and protect us in 
the future from such abiding faith. 

Senator Withington, who represents, in a way, San 
Diego, made an "Indian" of himself in the Senate the other 
day, when he attempted, by resolution, to prevent members 
of the press from securing copies of bills from the Sergeant- 
at-Arms, and accused some newspaper man — unnamed — 
of taking nineteen or some other ridiculous number of each 
bill for some hinted at unlawful and wasteful purpose. He 
was properly "called down" by the newspaper men pres- 
ent, and his constituents will name his successor next 
election. 

The Senate is going to investigate the disappearance of 
desks, chairs, and other furniture purchased last session. 
It all came about by Senator Smith's remarks on what he 
considered an extravagant appropriation of $597.50 to 
pay for a lot of new furniture for the use of some thirteen 
Senate Committees. The old furniture, it was stated, was 
being used by various State officers, whose right to pos- 
session of the same is doubtful. Senators Smith, Gillette 
and Dickinson are to be the investigators. After they in- 
vestigate, I wonder what will occur. Most probably the 
appropriation will be allowed for the new furniture and 
the old furniture deliberately declared missing. 

Leslie Blackburn, Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate, is 
wearing a beautiful gold badge presented him by his ad- 
miring friends in Alameda County. 

Governor Budd has introduced a new practice. When a 
junketing committee makes a trip, along with them goes 
the Governor. This may be a good idea, but these trips 
cost money, and the Governor has certainly been to all the 
State institutions visited many times before. 

Assemblyman Harry Mulcrevey, of the Thirty-seventh 
District, San Francisco, who, by the way, is one of the few 
worthy members from the metropolis, has introduced a 
bill making the theft of a bicycle a felony. All the wheel 
owners in the State are in favor thereof, and it will un- 
doubtedly pass. 

Next week the selection of State Library Trustees will 






They will 




S. 6. Goodhue. 



I tin- not ton many >> 
that body .' j out for ti.. 

tax pay 1 

makii 

it is to be hoped will b 
predated by his conslitu- 
cuts. Except for beii 

twenty year- a school trus- 

tee in San Mateo, where be 
lives, Mr. Goodhue nei 
fore held a public office, most 

probably because he never 
sought it, for in his district, 

where be has lived for thirty 
years, he has friends with- 
out number and is univers- 
ally respected. Mr. Good- 
hue is chairman of the com- 
mittee on Federal Relations, 
and a membpr of the com- 
mittees on Commerce and 
Navigation, Manufactures 
and Internal Improvements, 
and Roads and Highways. Among the measures that Mr. 
Goodhue has introduced and is interested in, is a bill look- 
ing for the protection and regulation of the dairying in- 
dustry; a bill protecting the forests; good roads; and favors 
the removal of the tax on shipping and non-compulsory 
pilotage. 

The bill appropriating $75,000 to cover a deficiency in 
the State Printing office will pass both Houses, despite 
opposition by the minority and a few of the Republicans, 
but will undoubtedly be vetoed by the Governor. The 
Governor's office and that of the State Printer are in op- 
posite wings of the Capitol building, and this exemplifies 
the feeling cordia.lt between those officials. In the Senate, 
the bill may be passed over the Governor's veto, but in the 
Assembly the minority will fight that appropriation to 
the bitter end, and may, with the few Republicans afore- 
said, force a compromise. They are willing to vote $30,000, 
the money to be used exclusively for Legislative printing. 
Business is dull here. The latest quotation on Assembly- 
men is sixty cents per dozen. Peg. 



m 

Excellent and v 
'practical suggestions 
from the standpoint of 
M accomplished hostess 

f/ll ° N 

f " Entertainments 
Entertaining" 

BY SPECTATOR 

1 "Cotillion Favors" 

11 OF THE SEASON 

IK*, described and illustrated. 
In the 



HARPER'S BAZAR 



10c. a Gopu 



$4 a Year 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 





We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



TO my mind Sudermann is Ibsen without 
the whiskers. In that vague collo- 
quialism, "whiskers," I see a symbol: a 
something dim and tangle- threaded, bifar- 
ious adown the steep face of modernity. 
grotesc)uing, shadowing, narrowing nature. 
And in the tensity of that scene where Magda finds nobility 
and bigness in the quiet, self-abnegation of the Rector, and 
the Rector sees scope and triumph and fulfillment in 
Magda's life, it fell upon me stronger, even than before, 
how vast and tangled Ibsen's whiskers arc. how dense 
they grow between him and the world — the world he never 
looks full in the face, but peeks at with the corners of bis 
eyes out over the hedges he has grown himself. Suder- 
man is so daringly unopinionated, so bravely uninquisitive. 
so inpeccably impersonal. No moral trails his play to 
rattle like a "can from a dog's tail. He asks no ques- 
tion, he courts no interrogation; he gives yo.i a pulsing 
re Of life with all life's contradictions and friction, and 
and creeds and prejudices, battling one against the 
other as tli attle so long as mortal man prescribes 

what is to be beyond the frontier of his own soul. 

* * * 

We chafe and stifle with Magda as the old family chains 
narrow around her again. We pity, even justify, the 
proud, yearning, bigoted father, who says, "Look at this 
there is no luxury — hardly even what you call good 
taste— faded rugs, birchen chairs, old pictures : and yet 
when you see the beams of the Western sun pour 
through the white curtains and lie with such loving touch 
on the old room, does not something say to you, 'Here 
dwells true happiness'.'' We sympathize with him, even 
to understanding why he would rather have had Magda 
come home in rags and tears. And yet Magda has but to 
say, "Filial love? 1 would like to take that dear, white 
head on my lap and say, 'You old child,' " and a broader, 
bigger ego claims our sympathy. 

So it is throughout the play. Gentle sister Marie 
would die a thousand deaths but defy not one convention 
for Max, and Magda pityingly says, "The most terrible of 
all passions becomes in their hands a mere resigned de- 
fiance of death." The Rector feels a something pent, un- 
expressed in his placid, unworldly life and Magda urges him 
on with, "to be greater than our sins is worth more than 
all the purity you preach." And the big little egotism of 
the Privy Councillor — so character-consistent, so probable, 
so inevitable in this mixed world of ours — how sickly green 
it turns in the glare and glitter of her scorn! She is a 
wonderful woman, this refined vulgarian Magda, with a 
philosophy and an animal power which dominate every thing. 
The softening influences of the Rector only accentuate her 
strength. She lays aside the light rapier of worldliness to- 
ward the last, when her heart begins to choke and she 
fights grimly, terribly, as the mother fights for her young, 
with the savage in her soul. And even to the very pride- 
broken death of her father she conquers, and you feel the 
awful justice of it all — and still there is neither glory nor 
content, nor aught but bitterness in the victory. 

Sudermann says nothing but "Here is life, look at it. I 
can show it to you but I cannot explain its justice or its 
injustice." Nor can he, for even while the ink was wet 
upon his work, it moved and breathed and became a some- 
thing, as Magda herself became, too strong, too bit.' too 
full of "lam 1" to stay, trembling, under the parental rod. 
And Sudermann called this creation of his brain, this one 
day snatched from the life that might be yours, or mine or 
anybody's, "Heimath" — Home! Is it not the irony of 

genius? 

# * # 

I never expect to see a perfect performance of Magda, 
and I dare say no one ever has. I can imagine, in the 
hazy way one imagines things which are perfect to one's 
own satisfaction, a performance wherein there is no virtu- 
osity, no star, but an ideal symphonic oneness. But stars 



have made Magda what she is in the realms of play-acting, 
and stars will sustain her there; and I do not think there 
ever will be enough ambitious actresses to make Magda 
herself hackneyed— as poor Camille is hackneyed— any 
more than there ever will be the inspiration, study and 
technical perfection in a supporting company to bring out 
that close, conflicting atmosphere the author has wedded 
to his work. 

In Monday night's performance at the Baldwin Theatre, 
there were two characters realized, two characters that 
were truthful to Sudermann, finished in all the details of 
acting, and worthy companion pictures to Modjeska's 
famous Magda— Joseph Howarth's Major Schubert, and 
George Osbourne's Privy Councillor, von Keller. By his 
fidelity to what Sudermann unmistakably outlines as von 
Keller's character, and the somewhat ludicrous misunder- 
st muling of that author by the ladies and gentlemen of the 
daily newspapers. Mr. Osbourne's interpretation has come 
in for a deal of slating— slating so far as the critics' inten- 
tion go, but in reality very pretty and ingenuous compli- 
ments for Mr. Osbourne. It is the first time in several 
seasons that I have known Mr. Osbourne to exact from 
himself the very best of which he is capable. The utter 
commi 1 3 of von Keller's appearance — which in 

itself makes a tragedy of his ever having been anything to 
Madga — the scrupulous, exasperating manner, the quiet 
pomposity of his speeches, the unspeakable contemptible- 
ness of the man — ever delicately suggested rather than 
laid on with gnarled eyebrows and tierce racialisms — 
which seem to have made Mr. Osbourne's Privy Councillor 
bad acting for my colleagues, is, to my thinking, the 
best, and onlj possible true acting of the part. Themake- 
up was faithful to Suderraann's directions, and the manner 
of the acting was an illumination of the lines. If the per- 
ho wrote those trustful notices forTuesday's papers 
will let go their pens for a few hours and read the play 
Heimath, a very good English version of which is published 
insoii, Wolffe & Co., they will find that von Keller is 
neither the Nelson Wheatcroft nor the Maurice Barrymore 
villain, but quite the sort of villain who occurs in actual 
life, and who does not wear his black soul on the outside 
so that you can measure it in the first act. 
# * * 

The enterprise of Al. Hayman & Co. in giving us Mod- 
jeska at this timely season is real philanthropy — so far as 
we are concerned — and not the least of this enterprise 
lay in bringing out Joseph Howarth, one of the foremost 
of young American actors, for leading man. Mr. Howarth's 
genius is ample enough to balance considerable discrepancy 
at the other end of the casts. It was not until after the 
first two acts that he got beneath the skin, so to speak, 
of Major Schubert, and then he realized the part to the 
vci'v center, blending the gentleness, austerity, pride, and 
narrowness of this pitiable old mar. with splendid convic- 
tion. Howarth, like Modjeska, is the player born, and 
his art is instinctive, sensitive, and sure. 

The other members of the company are not of a quality 
to shine in the peculiar exigencies of a Sudermann play. 
Sudermann is so usual to every-day life, so untheatric, so 
unepigrammatic, even, that the actors must feel, and be, 
rather than act, in the accepted sense. Lester Lonergan 
almost convinced me that a young man could play Rector 
Weber in the early part of the play, but his mellow sonor- 
ousness became monotonous and insufficient in the big 
scenes. Miss Frances Jolliffe, the dlbutante (what would a 
Modjeska season be without a dibutantef) played Marie 
very easily and prettily for a novice. What she lacks is 
not manner, but magnetism. Max is perhaps the least 
Sudermaunish of all the characters; he might belong to 
any popular drama. Landers Stevens did well enough 
with Max, considering the popular view he took of him, 
and the popular view most people take of acting, but Lan- 
ders has the misfortune to be my brother, so I doubly de- 
plore any stilted actorial methods that may have charac- 
terized his work. Miss Hattie Foley infused large, farce- 
comedy comicality into Aunt Franciska, which, of course, 
entirely ruined that immense contrast character. 

.Modjeska's Magda is not new to San Francisco, and it 
never will be old to those of us who preserve our better 
appreciation through the dreary seasons of mediocrity so 
long as she plays it as she did this week. I have never 
seen Duse, but if she is all the world proclaims her, it 



January 30. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NICWS 



must be that hers is like the beautiful, unostentatious art 
which marks Modjesk Modjesk .. bring 

out the big brutal note wl, -.vaii for some I 

mettlesome M.igda. S not come back to bi 

home with the world, the flesh, and the devil strident in 
her mien. Hers is a Manila ol fine, febrile organism, with 
the spring of the woman who has lived, the vitality 
animalism of a life used to freedom. And she feels the 
chains a thousand times heavier than they were in her 
girlhood. And this time, her self-wrought success, and 
her child arm her with a terrible justice. It is a charac- 
terisation full of nervous power and imperial imagination 
— easy to applaud, impossible to describe. 
• • • 

If, as her admirers insist, Lillian Nordica was retired 
from the Metropolitan Opera Company by any private 
malice, or jealousy, or family reasons of Jean de Reszke's, 
I can see a superb revenge in store for the American 
stress if she will take it when she gets back to New York. 
Let Nordica hire a hall, an orchestra, and any able-lunged 
tenor, and sintr the Si ene as she sang it for us at 

the Baldwin Saturday afternoon, and the Metropolis is 
hers: and there will be such a clamor around the walls of 
the Metropolitan that St. Jean and his angels will be only 
too glad to open wide the doors and let her in. And it will 
be the biggest argument ever offered in favor of American 
singers for American dollars. 

Musical New York is at present given up to two all-ab- 
sorbing questions — quiet enough in the title, but fraught 
with terrifying sensationalism in the discussion thereof. 
One is the Americans for America proposition; the other 
is the singableness and intelligableness of Wagner's operas. 
The musical journals, most notably the Musical Courier, 
are hot and savage, upon the pampered head of Jean de 
Reszke, who, they claim, in the grasp of his greed and am- 
bition, is unwilling to share either American ducats or 
American plaudits with the singers of America. The 
Metropolitan's receipts have not been materially diminished 
by all this; nevertheless, the patriots are still zealous, and 
noisy, and hopeful. But the biggest strife is between the 
Wagnerites and the anti-Wagnerites. The latter forces, 
composed of the plumbers and gasfitters of the daily news- 
papers, are led by little Alan Dale, a most entertaining 
and sulphurous critic of plays and play-acting, but a blith- 
ering ass in all the clefs of music. These find nothing but 
dire dissonance and disturbance of the peace in Wagner's 
music. The composer himself they call "Demented Dick," 
"Veary Vagner," "Wheezy Wag," and many other 
chaste epithets which the small fire-cracker mind easily 
explodes upon those it cannot and will not understand. The 
Wagnerites, the long-haired soiled ones, who fume, flare, 
swear, sweat, and die by the Bard of Beyreuth, follow in 
the wake of short-haired Mr. De Koven of The World and 
debonair Mr. Huneker of the Musical Courier and The Ad- 
vertiser. In his critical capacity, Reginald De Koven is 
the last man on earth you would suspect of writing comic 
operas. He goes to the Metropolitan companioned by a 
quadrant, a compass, an encyclopedia, a German-English 
lexicon, and a thermometer — a most un-Worldly person, 
who reads very much like The Tribune. James Huneker 
is a cosmopolite, a classicalist, a modern, a traditionalist, 
an innovator, a technician, a temperamentalist : he ex- 
changes color with his subject. Huneker is one of the few 
critics in America who earn their salaries: he is read 
— because he has nerve, and verve, and enterprise, and 
judgment, and wit. 

If the San Francisco telegrams have not already done 
the work, Nordica has only to go to conquer. Of course, 
she made pretty little vows never to sing Brunnhilde 
again, but Melba is vanquished, Lehmann is passee, Reszke's 
relative, Letvinne is voted fourth-rate, ar.d New York 
brandishes its golden horn of plenty and demands the best. 
Nordica will never let the opportunity go. Besides, it 
will be such a sweet, bitter one on Jean, who now will 
scarcely risk importing Ellen Gulbranson, since that Chris- 
tiania matron so widely missed the mark in the Berlin 
performances of Wagner's Ring des Nibelungen. And 
then, Reszke's splendid stripling Siegfried, will not get 
all the New York flowers. 

San Francisco is perhaps the worst place this side of 
Oklahoma to give an authoritative verdict on a Wagnerian 
performance, but the immense, compelling character of 



. that Nordica gave the 

I interpre- 
tation and Intel 

him to the slim ■ 

ASHTOH 



. er women an leville 

commodities, Then oat the Orpheum, and each 

a stunning 1 1 rapese work and 

posing on a perpend! 1 are, beyond their athletic 

excellence, a set utiful 

Clayton is the mosl expert 
Orpheum has ever engaged. 
both kinds of Bulging on the bill 



artistic pictures, Bessie 
and origini the 

Next week there will be 

■!il friend Quille, the 



tenor, and Ward and Curran, late of the Clipper 
Quartette. 

The big Aladdin production conies oil at the Tivoll to- 
night, and there will be a string of tw ket-scekers extend- 
ing from the box-office wav round to Powell street, where' 
the actors come from. Extravaganza is what the Tivoll 
patrons want just now. and extravaganza they are going 
to get in large, frolicsome quantities. Prom all promises, 
Uaddin is going to bi ;i 1 feast of music and mer- 

riment the Tivolians have had in seasons. Pest has painted 
new scenery. Martens and Hirsbfeld have written new 
music. Hartman has garnered new jokes, and maybe some 
of the other kind, and R. C. White, of She fame, has given 
a Jin de siecte turn to the story. There will be ballets and 
songs and specialties, and the entire Tivoli company in the 
cast. 

It is some time since wc have had a real farce-comedy, 
and many persons who are eccentric enough to go to the 
theatre to be amused will be glad to learn that The Prod- 
igal Father (there is a world of mirth in that title alone) 
opens at the Columbia Monday night. 

Thursday afternoon the first symphony concert, under 
the direction of the new society, takes place at the 
Columbia. Dvorak's first symphony and Tscbaikowsky's 
"Marche Slave" are among the orchestral novelties. Mrs. 
Kather'me Fleming-Hinrichs (wife of the conductor) will be 
the vocalist. 



BIJ ' TL J. A-L. Hayman & Co., (Incorporated) 

aldWin I heatre- Proprietors' 

Next week second and last of 

MODdESKA, 

supported by Mr JOSEPH HAWORTH and a complete com- 
pany. 

Monday, Tuesday and Saturday nights M AGBETH 

Wednesday andFrlday nights and Sat. mat MARY STUART 
Thursday night (only time) ADRIENNE LEQOUVREURE 
Monday, February 8th, MR. LOUIS JAMBS. 

G| I ■ n"L X The " Gem " Theatre of the Coast. 

OIUmDla I neat re- Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers . 
And now comes the acme of them all. Great cast comedy, 
comedians. That ,famously, uproarously, funny farce-comedy, 
THE 

PRODIGAL FATHER 

Third annual review. All new features. More or less up-to- 
date. A company of 20 people. Titenia, Jeannette Ardelle, 
Mme. Lorretta, Miss Marjorie Fair, Mips Rose Melville, Miss 
Carrie Graham. Lynn Welcher, Charles Boyle, Mat. M. Wills, 
D J Haplin, Fred'k WaJz, Joseph Yokes, George Nichols. 
The greatest mirth-provoking, farce comedy ever written. 
February 8ih, "Chimmie Fadden." 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rpnGUm. street, between Stockton and Powell streets, 

Week commencing Monday, February 1st Direct from France 

GUILLE, 

The world's greatest tenor; Ward & Curran, the clipper come- 
dians; Capitaine, "the perfect woman"; Bessie Clayton, "the 
prettiest, daintiest, and most bewitching dancer that ever daz- 
zled an audience; Binns & Blnns; Wilson & Waring; the Royal 
Hungarian Court Orchestra. Reserved seats, 25c ; balcony, 
10c; opera chairs and box seats. 60c. Matinees Wednesday, 
Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices: Parquet, any seat, 
25c; balcony, any seat, 10c; children, 10c, any part. 

Mrs. Ernestine Kbeling. 

Proprietor and Manager 



Tivoli Opera House. 



To-night. Our up-to-date extravaganza, 

ALADDIN, 

or, The Wonderful Lamp. A hodge-podge of mirth, music, bal- 
lets, beauty. The n«w electric Danse des Fleurs. The Float- 
ing Palace in Mid-Air. The Six Little Tailors. The superb 
Ballet of Cleopatras. 
The New and Novel Specialties- 
Popular Prices -•- 25o and50o 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 



THE REPULSE OF THE BURGLAR. 



Bv Jambs Chablton D<>\ 

THE Nicholson family was mortally afraid of burglars. 
Their house at Berkeley had never been robbed, but 
its occupants were in as constant terror of a midnight 
raid as if their home had been pillaged with monthly 
regularity. The unwritten annals of the family were re- 
plete with burglary incidents in which marauders had all 
but accomplished their purpose without actually forcing 
an entrance. Although when exposed to the cold examin- 
ation of the skeptical, the groundwork of these exciting 
experiences had invariably proved to be nothing more 
tangible than noises of varying degrees of mystery, no 
member of the extensive Nicholson connection ever ven- 
tured to question either the genuineness of the danger or 
the providential character of the deliverance. 
' According to the Nicholson belief, burglars roamed 
nightly about the premises. Although the desperadoes 
had never reached the climax of removing valuables or 
even of entering the house, the members of the family 
were continuallyon the alert, expecting that their vigilance 
would one night circumvent a practical thief in the flesh. 
A succession of false alarms, unbroken by anything more 
serious than an inquisitive cat, a stray dog or the howling 
of the wind, neither lessened their fright nor decreased 
their anticipation of robbery. 

it must not be supposed that their nightly fear cast a 
perpetual gloom over the lives of the Nicholsons. On the 
contrary, it was the source of some secret gratification. 
They diligently cultivated their nerves, clinging to the 
idea of midnight attacks with considerable comfort 
mingled with their timidity. It argued a measure of 
enviable importance, not to say aristocratic wealth, to 
know that their house wu> the center towards which all 
the porch-climbers and area thieves in the country were 
directing their covetous talents. 

Mrs. Nicholson, in her easy chair beside a wood fire, re- 
flected philosophically that sooner or later, the robbery 
was bound to be accomplished. The burglars, piqued by 
a succession of failures, would devote all their energies to 
the capture of her little citadel. Perhaps they would 
come that very Christmas Eve. It was dark enough, — 
just the night for a burglar's purpose. 

Her available defense force was somewhat weak. Her 
husband was absent and the members of the household 
were chiefly women and children, the nearest approach to 
a man being her nephew Henry, who, although a well 
grown lad of lx, was a chronic sufferer from moral and 
physical cowardice. 

Henry left the house early in the evening, returning 
about nine in a pelting rain. The family retired at the 
usual time and an hour or two later, Mrs. Nicholson, in 
spite of her quaking nerves, felt a thrill that was almost 
triumphal because of the accuracy of her intuition. She 
heard the long expected burglar. She was wide awake 
and there was no doubt of his presence this time. He was 
working with monotonous diligence and seemed to be filing 
away at the window fastening, keeping time to the drip, 
drip of the rain from the eaves. 

Mrs. Nicholson aroused her niece and the female servant 
and held a hurried consultation to decide the best means 
of thwarting the burglar's plans. As a forlorn hope they 
called Henry, but he was not easily awakened. When he 
was finally made to understand the nature of the family 
peril, he contributed some sage advice. 

"Hit him with an Indian club," Henry bravely coun- 
selled, and turning over, resumed his slumbers. 

Frightened as they were of burglars, the Nicholsons 
were more afraid of firearms, and no active aid being ob- 
tainable from Henry, the women prepared to attack the 
unwelcome visitor with domestic weapons. 

The burglar was at a window near the front door, 
hidden by the deep portico. The terrified females could 
hear him distinctly. Prompt action was necessary, so Mrs. 
Nicholson procured one of her nephew's Indian clubs and 
from an upper window hurled it in at the open side of the 
porch. 

As if recoiling from the blow, a big, black object leaped 
from the floor of the porch but did not run away. It ut- 



tered no sound when the heavy missle fell, so the sugges- 
tion that the cause of alarm might be an enormous dog, 
was scouted. 

"A dog would have howled." said the maid, convincingly. 

The undaunted burglar crouched down again on the 
floor of the porch, and after an interval of silence above, 
apparently thinking he would be safe from further in- 
terruption, boldly renewed his rasping work at the door. 
We shall be murdered if he gets in," Mrs. Nicholson 
called as an ultimatum through the key hole to Henry. 
We must strike a quick blow for our home and our 

Stimulated to action by the prospect of sudden death, 
Henry was finally persuaded to emerge from his retire- 
ment and assail the burglar, making the condition that 
the women should accompany him as a body guard. 
While Mrs. Nicholson remained at the upper window, 
Henry with a second Indian club in one hand and a crib- 
bage board in the other, crept slowly and reluctantly 
down stairs, followed by his sister, armed with a manicure 
set and a child's bow and arrow, while the servant carried 
a large kitchen knife and a potato masher. 

Quietly opening the front door a few inches, Henry 
threw club and cribbage board in the face of the intruder 
and bolted upstairs and into his room, upsetting in his 
flight the trembling girls on the landing. 

Simultaneously with Henry's discharge, Mrs. Nicholson 
from her place of vantage, dropped two dumb bells, a 
slate, several boots and a Noah's ark with its entire 
menagerie, upon the head of the bold thief. 

This combined volley of heavy artillery knocked the 
robber off the porch. In the dim light, the defenders of 
their home could see him lying motionless on the pave- 
ment below. 

Mrs. Nicholson was instantly smitten with remorse. 
The violent death of a human being was awful. She would 
always have it on her conscience, even if he were a 
burglar. 

"I suppose it will be justifiable homicide, but, oh, dear! 
it's just dreadful," she wailed, wringing her hands, "and 
he probably wasn't ready to die. " 

The watchers above saw the robber leap up as if in the 
death agony. Then he lay rigid. 

In nervous apprehension, tortured by. their consciences 
and the fear of an undefined punishment by the law the 
women sorrowfully waited for the dawn, too unnerved to 
seek assistance, Henry, meanwhile, lying trembling in his 
bed. They were afraid even of a dead burglar and re- 
luctantly allowed the corpse to remain where it lay, ex- 
posed to wind and rain. 

It was a dreary watch, and at the first glimpse of day- 
light. Mrs. Nicholson, with a sigh of relief, dressed to go 
to the police station and surrender herself. Herneice and 
the maid prepared to accompany her. 

Henry declared he would await his arrest at home. 
He secretly argued that it was uncertain whether he or 
his aunt had delivered the fatal blow. Since she was so 
ready to acknowledge her guilt, he, by keeping in the 
background, would at least not be arraigned as the chief 
criminal and he might even avoid all punishment. 

"It is more dignified, said Mrs. Nicholson as she ad- 
justed her bonnet before a m ; rror, determined to look her 
best even in a dungeon; "It is much more dignified to give 
myself up voluntarily to the authorities, than to be dragged 
through the streets branded as a murderess." 

She was interrupted by a shout from Henry, who after 
reconnoitering, had rushed out and dragged indoors the 
remains of the robber. 

"Why, it's only my old umbrella," he said, in a sudden 
outburst of contemptuous bravery. "The handle's broken, 
and the cloth's torn, so I just dropped it outside the door 
when I came home last night in the rain. The wind has 
turned it inside out." 

All the Nicholsons are still at large, uncharged with 
murder or any other crime. They talk no more of covetous 
thieves, however, and the next burglar who happens that 
way may carry off the house without fear of molestation 
from its occupants. 



"Brown's Bronchial Tit— hbs " are a simple yet most effectual rem- 
edy tor Coughs, Hoarseness and Bronchial Troubles. Avoid imitations. 



January 30, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO Nl 




Losm 



i<>: ■ r r v 



'HEM rnament, which 

;it Madison - ,ii;ire Garden on Satur- 
day night, was an event which will surely be rememlvrril 
in history. It was a rev. thousands of people 

who have never realized the moaning ami extent of the 
militia work and the thorough devotion of militiamen, too 
often called toy soldiers, to their work. The Third Cav- 
alrymen Ketrulars also opened the eyes of unaccustomed 
observers by their superb riding, and the cowboy and 
Indian of the plains styles of riding nave left an ineffaceable 
impression. And best of all, perhaps, a very large sum 
has been added to the Hospital Fund for invalid militia- 
men, their wives and children, which Mrs. Howard Carroll 
and other interested and benevolent women arc attempt 
ing to collect. The purpose is to establish a large ward 
in the Hahnemann Hospital for the State soldiers and 
their families. The sum has already gone beyond the ten 
thousand dollars at first deemed necessary. 

Of California faces 1 have seen very few lately, perhaps 
because there have been suggestions of blizzards in the air 
when one's own four walls are so attractive that one does 
not care to tempt Providence by going out often. J. D. 
Redding has been in Philadelphia on a business trip for a 
few days, and has just returned to town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jim Lake have also been in the Quaker City for a week, 
visiting Mrs. James Elverson, Jr. Sir Bache and Lady 
Cunard are on a visit to Lady Cunard's mother, Mrs. 
Tichenor, and are at the Holland House. Mr. and Mrs. 
George Rutledge Gibson (Miss Belden)gave a large dinner 
last night in honor of Charles Dana Gibson, the artist, who 
is a relative of the host. 

Mrs. Harry Gillig is once more contemplating a Europ- 
ean journey. She gave an interesting musicale to a few 
friends on Tuesday night, at which Miss Eugenie Ferrer 
charmed every one with her Spanish songs. She played 
again last night at the marriage of Miss Leona Bush to 
Claude de Lamontte. Miss Bush is a niece of Dr. Henna, 
one of New York's prominent surgeons. 

By the time this letter reaches you, Miss Mollie Torbert 
will have been transformed into Mrs. Kirkpatrick. The 
wedding will be celebrated at the Church of All Angels, in 
West End avenue, and a reception will follow at Sherry's. 
The bridal pair will go South on their wedding journey. 
Miss Torbert has entirely recovered from her severe ill- 
ness and looks like herself again. Lieutenant D. L. Tate, 
who came to New York to participate in the recent Mili- 
tary Tournament, has returned to New Hampshire with 
his regiment. He is still "Handsome Danny." Mrs. 
George Crocker gave a large dinner on Tuesday night. 
To-night Mrs. De La Mar will be hostess at a similar en- 
tertainment. 

At the opera on Saturday afternoon, I saw Mrs. La 
Montague, nee Catherwood, who is more beautiful and 
attractive than ever. By the way, the opera was un- 
usually interesting, as it was Calve's second appearance 
as Marguerite in Faust, and the performance was a revel- 
ation. Heretofore the role has been sung— and sung,' 
perhaps, with certain sentiment — but with this incompar- 
able artist the character itself was livid before one. There 
are many innovations in her acting. Instead of seating 
herself at once when she enters the garden, and after 
comfortably cosing as a tableau before beginning "Le Roi 
de Thule," she walks about— folds her little cape to put it 
aside— pulls out the spinning wheel and chair, singing all 
the while as though to herself, and ends the first verse be- 
fore taking her place at the spinning wheel. It was 
beautifully natural. The jewel song, instead of being a 
mere vocalization, was an exquisite bit of acting as well. 
And the gradual surrender in the love scene was marked 
in the climax by an embrace of such abandon that it 
thrilled everyone. Not an opportunity was neglected 
throughout. I have never seen a Marguerite before, 
although I have heard them. Calve's voice, too, is in per- 
fect condition, but it is needless for me to write you of 
that perfect voice. There are carping ones who say that 
Melba's determination to leave America for a two months 



much as it 



• hs Id <i 

Company, and her Fi 

that ever came over Another laurel for California. 

1' \~m: I' IBTOl 1. 



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application. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 




a Book Many long centuries before the invention of 
of printing, one of the wisest and shrewdest of 

the Week* the sons of men uttered a since almost uni- 
versally known and quoted phrase, "Of 
making books there is no end." Though books without 
end still continue to appear, it is a singular fact that nowa- 
days reading has become, to the great majority of men. an 
impossibility. It is one of the good things that the multi- 
plication of journals misnamed " newspapers.'' ami of pic- 
ture books miscalled "magazines," has well-nigh taken 
away from us. It is true that the average man sometimes 
fancies that his devotion to the spoiled sheets of whitish 
paper that we dignify by the name of "organs may ulti- 
mately lead him to become a reader of books; but. of 
course, this is an utter delusion. Nothing can be further 
from the truth. The newspaper-babit, if persisted in, is 
absolutely fatal to the formation of a taste for reading. 
The confirmed newspaper-fiend, accustomed to his daily 
drams of modern journalism, gradually and surely loses 
that power of concentration necessary for the profitable 
perusal of anything worth reading. And, even if he does 
now and then make a half-hearted attempt to read some- 
thing, wi.at is he likely to get hold of? Of a book? 
Oh. no! With all the multiplication of printers, steam- 
presses, and other apparent facilities for the manufacture 
of printed paper, books are becoming scarcer. Our friend 
most probably gets what be calls a book at a notion store, 
whither he has gone to buy "sox," or his wife brings one 
home as a premium on a pair of corsets or a pound of 
candy. But are these paper-covered monstrosities books? 
Far from it : they consist of a hundred or two of pages of 
cheap, dirty-looking, evil-smelling paper, covered with ill- 
formed characters, and clamped together by metal 
fasteners that make the gorge of every book lover rise 
within him. These things being so. it is all the more grati- 
fying to see a book occasionally. The little volume re- 
cently put forth by the Roycroft Printing Shop, and en- 
titled "An Essay on Art and Life," is a book. It is true 
that it contains only ninety pages, but these are of hand- 
some paper; the typography is beautiful and accurate, the 
margins are broad and adorned with quaint devices in red. 
Each paragraph begins with an ornamental letter, and 
each chapter with a character illuminated by hand. The 
whole production is a delight and a standing protest 
against the cheap and nasty things that we have always 
with us. The essayist draws our attention to the fact 
that all the highest pleasures of life, such as the con- 
templation of the wondrous works of Nature and the mar- 
vels of creative Art, require special aptitude and careful 
training for their enjoyment. It is of little avail to show to 
aman of untrained mind and heart a picture of liaftaelle, 
or a church of Michael Angelo, or to put into his bands a 
book of Rusk in. This is to cast pearls before swine. The 
great majority of people are unwilling, or positively unable, 
to devote the attention, patience, and endurance that are 
necessary to the acquisition of the power to enjov the 
highest pleasures. The poor, from the necessities of their 
daily life, cannot do so. and the rich generally render 
themselves impotent to enjoy any pleasures except those 
coarse ones which can be bought with money, and which 
call for no vigor of mind or attention, for no exercise of soul. 
But be who will give good natural endowments, time, un- 
tiring patience, and strenuous attention, to the acquisi- 
tion of the power to appreciate and enjoy the highest 
pleasures, is sure of his reward. His sense* of beautv will 
grow finer and keener year by ear. and his soul will 
gradually come to resemble a perfectly attuned musical 
instrument. The highest aesthetic pleasures surpass all 
others in excellence, becai be enjoyed 

without wastefulness and hurt to one's' fellow creatures. 
The pleasures of and of passion are rapturous, 

but they always cost as much as they are worth— often 
more. 

*"Artand Life," by Vernon bee. Published bv I he Koycroft 
Printing Shop, bast Aurora, N. Y. 1806. 



After the nonsense one is accustomed to hear and read 
on the subject of English society, it is a pleasure to have 
the subject treated of by one who knows whereof he speaks. 
Hence our satisfaction in reading Mr. G. W. Smalley's 
article in the January issue of Harper's Magazine. The 
writer points out that the qualification for admission to 
London society (which is probably the most brilliant, the 
most splendid, and certainly the most varied to be found 
in the world), is not wealth nor political position, nor even 
rank. Very rich men. of course, are found in it, men of 
great political distinction, and men of high birth and rank, 
but none of these qualifications is of itself enough to secure 
for its possessor free admission to the charmed circle. 
Still less does presentation at Court secure the desired re- 
sult, though not to have been presented may be a draw- 
back. The candidates for admission to society must, to 
put it very simply, show that they are worthy of admis- 
sion; they must be interesting and thoroughly ait fait with 
the usages. As society has much to offer, it fairly enough 
expects that the applicant shall bring something also. As 
to the morality of high society, in sexual and other matters, 
Mr. Smalley wisely says it is impossible to know whether 
there are more or fewer sinners in the smartest set than 
there are in other sets. There are no available statistics, 
and. till there are. we cannot say with any degree of cer- 
tainty that the morals of grocers and bagmen are a whit 
superior to those of carls and countesses. Mr. Smalley 
also warns Americans who hope to win a place in English 
society by the sweat of their tongues, that the English 
have a horror of the silver-tongued orators and profes- 
sional story-tellers, who expect the company to cease talk- 
ing of what interests them and listen to their efforts to 
win admiration. The most valuable qualities in modern 
society at the British metropolis are brevity of speech 
(the British never could abide your long-winded, single- 
streak talkers), lightness of touch, adaptability, self-pos- 
session without obtrusiveness, and a capacity for conform- 
ing to the prevailing note. 

In November of last year, a new candidate for the favor 
of the San Francisco public made its appearance under the 
title of The Family Journal. The first issue consisted of 
twenty-four pages of Harper's Weekly size, with an illus- 
trated cover designed by Theodora Holly. The cover pre- 
sents to us a fair-baired. thinly-clad young woman, stand- 
ing in the moonlight with her back against a tree trunk. 
Around her runs a border of bunches of grapes; the moon 
is far from round, but we hope that this is not to be at- 
tributed to the indistinctness of the maiden's vision. In- 
side the covers are stories by Helen Campbell, Sara Gra- 
ham, Ellen Coit Elliott. William J. Neidig. W. A. Curtis. 
and others; articles by J. Burtt Davy, Dr. F. J. Masters I 
(the Superintendent of the Methodist Chinese Missions), 
and H. T. Ardley. John F. Sheehan has a page entitled 
"Amateur Sport." and Mae Eleanor Gates conducts a page 
on fashions. A department of hygiene is in the charge of 
Dr. D. Maclean, the price of this first issue was twenty- 
live cents, more than can reasonably be asked for a peri- 
odical of this size and character, when we consider that 
Harper's Weekly and the Illustrated News of the World 
are sold for ten cents. The December issue, reduced to 
ten cents, contains an illustrated article on "The Beach- 
masters of the Pribvlof," by David Starr Jordan, stories 
by W. J. Neidig. W. J. Piatt, Mary Roberts Smith, W. A. 
Curtis, Sybil Gray, and others. R. K. Culver writes of 
"The Illustrations of a Modern Newspaper." and 
Joaquin Miller on California's Corner-Stone." F. 
A. Lucchesi has an article on musical topics, and Ger- 
trude Zindars one on decorative Art. While we think the 
that the proprietors of The Family Journal have got a hard 
road to travel, we wish them success. 



The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac for 1897 contains 468 
- of closely and well printed information of the world 
in general, and of Brooklyn and Long Island in particular. 
There are also two or three maps and several plans. It 
is a sort of " Whitaker's Almanac" for the City of 
Churches, and certainly offers a great amount of matter 
for twenty-five cents. 



A Sovereign Remedy. 

DR. PARKER'S COUGH CIRE. One dose will stop a cough. It Lever 
„alls. Tryit. Prloe 26c. George Dahlbender & Co , 214 Kearny street. 



January 30, 1897. 



*.\X IK 




%RJsf 



-.. 'pilK I'ri.ku PortnighV 
1 lios are to he con 
ulated upon baring an ex< .'ive officer of 90 much 

_"•■ as Mrs. Monroe Salisbury. The latly evidently had 
come to the conclusion that t.> gain the attendance rci|t>i- 
site to ensure a brilliant sue. r>>. novelty must t>e ■ 
der of the evenings, and so next in line to the military 
cotillion came the mask and domino party, but alas' limited 
to members only. However, tl wily remedied by 

pping up to the captain's oflice," and joining. 

* * • 

The return of Miss Emma Butler to our swim, fresh from 
her social triumphs in the East, has been a source of much 
pleasure to her friends, the young lady being uuusually 
popular. Her return is the more welcome, as society's 
ranks are thinning in the marriage of so many of its mem- 
bers, and the death of Mrs. Williams will cause the with- 
drawal of Miss Juliette Williams therefrom the rest of the 
season. Of the brides of the future, still another charm- 
ing girl is added to the list in the engagement of Miss Min- 
nie Burton, which is the last reported, and several are de- 
clared to be an assured fact, and only waiting for a special 
function for their announcement. 

* * * 

Rumor has it that Miss Lily Lawler will add the attrac- 
tion of her singing to the programme for Herr Schott's 
concert d' adieu to take place shortly. As the eminent tenor 
is said to have deferred his homeward departure for the 
special purpose of training the young lady's voice, it surely 
would be nothing less than grateful for her to sing at his 
concert, and give her numerous friends an opportunity of 
judging what has been really accomplished. No doubt a 
crowded house will be the result. 

* * * 

" There is one thing to be said of our society. Cavilers 
may dub us the wild and woolly West; call us crude, fast, 
and slangy; but if our women do overstep good form occa- 
sionally, do speak in high-pitched tones, do exhibit a slap 
dash familiarity of manner and speech, they at least never 
bring about the fearful scandals which now and then rend 
the social system of aristocracy in London and New York." 
Thus spoke a recently elected official at a leading club 
lately, and what he said is manifestly correct. 

* * * 

Each of our pretty belles is devoutly praying that the 
coming Prince of Flanders, who is to tour the United 
States, may be in San Francisco before the B'lingham sea- 
son begins, "for," say these pretty creatures, "there's 
no show for any girl down there when the matrons get in 
their work." Needless to say, the prospect of a possibility 
of one day becoming Queea of Belgium is turning all the 
girls' heads. Princes are sometimes won by Yankee girls, 
'tis true, but Poniatowski and Flanders are miles apart. 

# * * 

Mrs. Hager's much-talked-of, much-hoped-for function, 
still hangs fire, and nothing of a definite nature is known 
regarding it. At a lunch party last week, some one sug- 
gested giving the old lady a bint that the winter was pass- 
ing away and her county not yet heard from. 

* * * 

At the reception given on the 26th inst. by Mrs. Stan- 
ford, at which 800 people were present, Max Abraham 
was the caterer. The affair, it goes without saying, was 

an unqualified success. 

* * * 

Sir William Booker and wife are still with us, the vener- 
able couple finding our climate far ahead of the famed 
Riviera, or south of France. 

* # * 

On dit, it is not handsome Harry, but brother Hugh, 
who is to enter matrimony's devious paths in the near 
future. 

The King of Pills is Beecnam's— BEECHAM'S 




ItU MtDIC.fU DEPARTMENT 



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Awarded Mcdtil nod Diploma Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1808 



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CLOAKS, 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 




The motive of the advance in Giant Pow- 

The Deal in der stock from $17 to $30 is still open to 

Giant Powder, question, more especially when it is 

known that the company is loaded 
down with an indebtedness exceeding $200,000, equal to 
$10 for every share of its capital. The leverage employed 
was unquestionably an alleged proposition on foot to estab- 
lish a compact, but these negotiations seem throughout to 
have been a very one-sided affair. They failed to awaken 
any interest in any of the other powder companies' stocks, 
one or two of which would be chiefly benefited by a com- 
pact. Still the touts on the street for Giant kept howling 
away about the arrangement which every other day was 
"just about to be completed,'' while a manipulating force 
applied the financial jack-screw on the market. It is evi- 
dent from the petty little game going on, reminiscent of 
an operation in Phil Sheridan, or Lady Bryan, that some 
self-created Napoleon of finance must size this up for a 
jay town. A play of this kind can certainly not be made 
on the pockets of level-headed business men. The only 
purses vulnerable, one would suppose, would be those of 
wealthy old spinsters or addle-pated phantoms of the 
gilded male persuasion with money to burn. Investors of 
trust funds or the advisors of the widow and orphan will 
scarcely hazard an investment of the kind which bears the 
marks of manipulation in such a cold-blooded manner. It 
is now hiuted on California street that talk of a com- 
promise among the water people across the bay will next 
be used for inflation purposes, or a "deal," as some people 
might term it. The fashion is evidently catching. One 
thing is certain, that if this kind of game is going to con- 
tinue in local stocks, the competition will bear more 
hardly on the gentlemen of the Pine-street bourse. While 
it may attract their clientele, it is apt to force the more 
conservative element among investors into safer channels, 
where the price of industrial stocks of the kind is regu- 
lated entirely by their earnings, and not by the manipula- 
tion of stock jobbers. 

Not many weeks ago a prominent mining 
Mining Sales paper published a statement showing 
in 1896. sales of California mining property abroad 
during the past year, aggregating mil- 
lions. The statement was alluded to as false and mislead- 
ing, in this column, and prejudicial to the interest of the 
industry. Since then, scarcely a day passes without some 
exaggerated flare up from the space fiend on the press, 
who seems to recognize in every new arrival a financial 
demigod, loaded down with millions for disbursement 
among mine owners. Mining properties are disposed of 
in an oft-hand fashion, and each repetition of the tale adds 
thousands of dollars to the price. The foreign fakir with 
a bond extracted from some unfortunate mine owner, 
laboring under the delirium of millions dancing before his 
dazzled eyes, is posed an naturel'va passing homeward, and 
possibly out of sight for all time in this part of the world 
as a bona-jutt purchaser. And «c it goes. Leaving France 
and the Continent, with a record for the year of a couple 
of bonds on California properties, on none of which has a 
dollar yet been realized outside of the promoters' elabo- 
rations, published here for effect, the official list of opera- 
tions in Great Britain for 1801) is now open for investiga- 
tion. During the vear, 857 new mining companies were 
brought out there, with a nominal capital of 104,419,194, 
against 901 companies in 189"). capitalized for £107,387,241. 
California is credited in the list of companies that /,„,; pub- 
I proipectuset with one solitary representative, the 
ntain Copper (old Iron Mountain), capital, £1,250,000. 
Under the list of companies simply registered, California 
scores five during the twelve months, viz: Alabama, capi- 
tal, £120,000; Consolidated Crown Point Gold, capital, 
100; Lone Ridge Gold Mine, capital, £120,000; Mor- 
ris Ravine Gold Mines, capital. >Jl,">o,000; and the River- 
side Gold Mines, capital, £50,000. This is rather a 1. 
showing in point of the number of sales, although as 
cannot be said of the capitalization. As this is about all 
it amounts to so far, nobody has been very badly hurt, 



although, in the majority of instances, the intentions of the 
promoters have been well meant — for their own pockets. 
It might be added, in reference to 
Experts Who these mining promotions that, out- 

Incline to Caution, side of the Alabama, of unhealthy no- 
toriety sufficient, it will be hoped, 
to warn off investment, the most of the properties are un- 
known to fame, outside of the old Crown Point, which 
blossoms out for the second time in public within ten years. 
On the previous occasion the capital asked was figured in 
as many pounds sterling as it is now in dollars. On this 
market, if offered at as many dollars as it is pounds in 
London, it would go a-begging until a generation crops 
up with no eye-teeth to cut in passing from cradle to the 
grave. The reason that the millions in sales reported 
here during the year as the willing promoters hitched on 
to properties of suggested merit, failed to materialize, is 
that the class of experts now operating here is of a higher 
order than usual. So far the work done by these gentle- 
men reflects to their credit. Quite a lot of iucipient ras- 
cality has been nipped in the bud, and the inflated ideas of 
would-be promoters have received a set-back which will 
prove highly beneficial. The Union-Gold, Ilex, Josephine, 
and the other swindles of the past, have taught people a 
lesson in caution which has evidently proved profitable. 
The same stripe of operators are still crawling about here, 
but it is noticeable that while tolerated, they do not main- 
tain the confidence of respectable experts, who very 
rightly consider it unsafe to have their names linked in any 
operation. It is a recognized fact that the rascal who 
would win success in financial ventures, must score early 
in the game and stand on velvet before the opprobrium of 
failure attracts attention to his unenviable personality. 
From the day it does, his progress to the gutter may be 
slow, but it is as certain as the cry of "Hands off" which 
follows the appearance of every scheme with which his 
name can be connected. So far there have been more re- 
jections of California properties on examination, than 
acceptances, and in nearly every case the cause has been 
the exorbitant price asked by the owners, who have been 
educated up to the belief that the average expert for for- 
eign capital is either a knave or a fool. No matter how 
much this may have applied to the past, it certainly does 
not to the men now to the fore in the business, a fact 
which has dawned upon the minds of one or two property 
owners during the past thirty days. In the course of 
time we will probably get business down to a legitimate 
basis in California mine promotion, when the surplus 
steam generated by wild-eyed enthusiasm has blown off. 
The mines are here all right, and investors will come in time 
when the "hog" is not rampant in mining circles, as he is 
at present. 

A sharp advance in the shares of the 
The Strike in Con. -Cal. -Virginia Company followed the 
Con. -Virginia, official announcement, made early in the 
week, of a new ore discovery in the old 
California ground. While driftiug in the region of what 
is known as the 1550 level, a vein of very high-grade ore 
was encountered, assays averaging, it is said, $200 per 
ton. The find cannot be exploited from this point, owing 
to lack of facilities for handling the ore. An upraise will 
have to be made from the 1650 level below. This will take 
some time. In the meantime, activity in the market 
should be stimulated by the chances for an improvement 
at any moment, as work in this upraise progresses. 
Friends of the business will hope that the find will open 
out into ample proportions, and stir up a breeze of genu- 
ine old-time excitement on the street. As it is, there was 
a better tone to the market during the week, with a live- 
lier run of business among the broking fraternity than they 
have had for some time past. An assessment of twenty- 
five cents was levied on Best & Belcher on Tuesday. 

People who own locations in Randsburg 
The Future continue to say that they have the big- 
Of Randsburg. gest thing on earth. Men who go there 
with the intention of investment, claim 
that this is all in their ind's eye, and that it will be time 
enough for the locators to figure up their profits in the 
millions when they op. m. up the ground and get water with- 
in some eighty or one hundred miles. Only a little differ- 
ence of opinion, that is all. 



January 30, 1897. 






«3 




. 






■H««r the Crier :" "Wni ihederll art thout" 
'One thai wlllt>I»i the .1, •. : , ,| r- with you ." 



WHAT our British cousins will think of us when they 
hear thai an ex Senator amused himself by chewing 
the ear of a waiter reman - eon. It is known that 

our Solous indulge in much talk and vituperation of other 
Powers when in the hallow,.! precincts of the Senate 
chamber, but that one of their useless order should so far 
endanger his life as to enter into combat with a waiter 
(a live one, not a dumbone is beyond our comprehei 
The fact will most assuredly be commented upon by the 
British press as a sign of the unsettled times. In extenu- 
ation we can say that Mr. Grady came from Ireland 
origiually and Fresno lately. 

WE are glad to state that the question of the Rev. Mr. 
Rader's orthodoxy is settled for ever, and that the 
allegations made against him by many up-to-date members 
of his congregation, accusing him of breadth in his religious 
views, are unwarranted and uncalled for. The gentleman 
in question delivered a few nights ago a lecture on "The 
Book of Jonah" and clearly proved to his detractors that 
his is still the sweet, simpie faith of the eighteenth century 
and that he is averse to all enlightenment. Mr. Rader has 
apparently swallowed his conscience as easily as the whale 
did its Jonah. 

THE last meeting of the venerable Pioneers passed off 
peacefully enough considering the combustible ele- 
ments constituting that religious Order. Time was when 
free fights were in order, but that was when two or three 
legitimate '49ers were scattered among the members. 
Now that they are dead a discreet silence is maintained 
by those remaining, lest their right to membership be 
questioned. The only Pioneers we know of are not mem- 
bers of the Society; their self-respect keeps them out of 
it. 

SAN FRANCISCANS should be glad that the great 
winds and the fogs celebrate high carnival in this 
city and that the softer zephyrs play about the southern 
portion of the State. All the one-lunged men in the world 
accumulate in Los Angeles and the neighboring villages, 
while here only the hardy and the healthy can exist. 
Thank God for the fog, ye Silurians and sitters on barrels. 
Were it not for our climate the one-lunged Easterner 
would run ye out of business. 

ONE Charles M. Stebbins, of Boston, is seeking noto- 
riety with a volume entitled "The New and True Re- 
ligion." Along with other public benefactors, Mr. Steb- 
bins is apparently willing to foist his wretched views on 
the world for the incidental remuneration of six-bits or one 
dollar. The Town Crier holds that the man who is fortu- 
nate enough to possess the true religion should go into the 
wilds of Borneo and hug himself. The thing is precious. 

KISSING, instead of being a capital pleasure, is con- 
sidered a crime in Oakland where the stewardess of 
the Receiving Hospital may be fired for allegedly indulg- 
ing in osculatory exercise with a gen'lum fren', and also 
committing other minor offenses. Were we a woman in- 
stead of a divine man, we would prefer to let the dead 
bury their dead rather than become a nurse if such cruel 
regulations went with the job. 

THE announcement is made that the Greeks of this city 
will form a company of volunteers for service in 
Cuba. Judging by their names these gentlemen, all of 
whom are in the liquor business, suffer from the "itch" 
even unto torture. Death might therefore be pleasure 
unto them. We fear, however, their enthusiasm will die 
out after a few parades up and down Polk Street. 

«N Oakland lady of advanced views has applied to our 
police for assistance iu finding her husband. The 
Town Crier suggests that the advanced one seek for him 
in her kitchen. 

WHY fight for cheaper water while the charges for 
whiskey are still so exorbitant? 



only to the dinner I 
now that ll ting to force Ill, 

c&amlm ./. twit, .r n halt li 

«!'< >' >i: del i! with a larger appreciation of humor than 
a shai . .itely arrested for 

1 lug and Belling ins wire's tombstone. The 

• ,1 the ornament and tribute to 
her blessed memory and, more likely than not. wa- pleased 
over the theft, Her friends will no longer have a clue to 

her age. 

IT is refreshing 1.. know that at last there is a chance of 
the Bewers 01 San Francisco being Hushed and through 

the aid of the Supervisors. The Town Cries recomn 
that as a first means towards achieving this desirab 
suit, these genial gentlemen be thrown down them one 
all. Heaven knows they are capable of cleaning out al- 
most anything. 

SN aged capitalist lately rejoined his wife after a 
mysterious absence of many years, and all in fulfill- 
ment of a dream. There must be some mistake here. The 
Town Crier, who joined the ranks of the capitalists some 
years ago, unfortunately lost with the elevation in his 
social status the ability to indulge in dreams. 

WE are not hearing much about those enemies to society, 
the milk-men, these days. Can it be that they have 
had private mains introduced into their dairies, and can 
thus acquire their necessary amount of Nature's sweet re- 
storer without attracting public attention by stopping at 
the pumps? 

THE directors of the Ebell Society have decided to 
maintain a dignified silence concerning the alleged 
blackballing of a lady aspirant to membership. Seeing 
that the directors are all women, the Town Crier laughs 
up his patched sleeve at their decision. 

SHOULD the Swanhilda and her crew go down to Davy 
Jones's locker without our knowing of it, the detec- 
tives and other unjailed criminals of the world will come to 
San Francisco, and die in due time of nervousness brought 
on by continual expectation. 

THINGS are getting decidedly hot up at Sacramento. 
The Crier recommends that Martin Kelly be sent up . 
there with that old fire engine of his, even if the city funds 
are drawn upon to get him there. They will be appropri- 
ated sooner or later, anyhow. 

THE Chronicle is authority for the fact that young Sir 
Robert Peel has written an "amazing" book. The 
Town Crier will bet his little war club that the fellow 
will be "skinned" by the critics before the down appeai-s 
on the lip of 1897. 

THE latest weather forecaster to venture into this wild 
and woollv city is a gentleman of the name of Reed. 
It will not be long before he is shaken by the wind of public 
opinion. 

THE Park Commissioners are to be petitioned for a 
bridle path in Golden Gate Park. Seeing that a 
Lover's Walk is there, the petition should be granted. 

WE understand that Corbet t and FHzsimmons will fight 
in Nevada and not in Mexico. Since when, pray, has 
the right of free speech been denied in that country? 

ftNEW "coach" has been hired to look after the Stan- 
ford youths. Needless to say, the fellow's attentiou 
will be given their muscles and not their minds. 

AN^aMan professor is said to have discovered a cure 
for consumption. This probably consists of the copious 
use of garlic as food. Even Death draws the line at that. 

ONE seldom sees a Chinaman intoxicated, but Little 
Pete, with three bullets in him, may properly be said 
to have been loaded. 

WHY all this abuse of the chewers of gum ? Since the 
Crier lost his teeth he has done it himself, and he is 
no slouch, either. 

BENEATH this stone a lawyer sleeps; 
Let's trust Death played with hiru for keeps. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 




BALLADE OF FORGOTTEN LOVES -arthur qrissom. 

SOME poets sing uf sweethearts (lead, 
Some sing of true loves far away, 
Some sing of those that others wed, 
And some of idols turned to clay ; 
I sing a pensive roundelay 
To sweethearts of a doubtful lot, 

The passions vanished in a day- 
Toe little loves that I've forgot. 

For, as the happy years have sped, 

And golden dreams have changed to gray, 

How oft the flame of love was fed 

By glance or smile, from Maud or May, 
When wayward Cupid was at play ; 

Mere fancies, formed of who knows what? 
But still my debt I ne'er can pay 

The little loves that I've forgot. 

t > joyous hours forever tied ! 

< ' Mtddeu hope that would not stay ' 
Held only by the slender thread 

Of memory that's all astray. 

Their very names I cannot say, 
Time's will is done, I know them not; 

But blessings on them all, I pray— 
The little loves that I've forgot 



Sweetheart, why foolish fears betray? 

Ours is the one true lovers' knot; 
Note well the burden of my lay — 

The little loves that I ve forgot! 



AT SUNSET-— MARTHA m'culioch-williams. in codey's maoazine- 

Send me a song at sunset, 
And fill each pulsing line 

With the lilt the runnel sang in June 
And the sigh of the swaying pine. 

The swaying pine had green young tips- 
One soft caressed my cheek; 

Ah : happily the water sang 

The thing we dared not speak. 

Send me a sigh at sunset, 

A sigh for life and loss. 
My heart shall hear, and whisper clear 

A thousand miles across, 
" In June the pine had green young tips— 

But ah! beloved, remember 
How clear the steadfast hue abides 

In frosts of chill December I " 

Send me a thought at sunset; 

Straight on the level beams 
It shall leap the earth and breast the sea 

To color all my dreams. 
Anew a golden June shall burn 

And pine-tips kiss my rheek. 
What time the lilting runnel sings 

The thing we dared not speak. 



A PARABLE.— thomas bailey aldrich 

One went Kast and one went West 

Across the wild sea-foam, 
And both were on the self-same quest. 
Now one there was who *'ared for naught 

So stayed a home: 
Yet of the three 'twas only he 
Who reached the goal— by him unsought. 



PARTING —EMILY DICKIHSOH, IN SCRIBNERS 

My life closed twice befor. its close; 

It yet remains to see 
If Immortality unveil 

A third event to me, 

So huge, so hopeless to conceive 

As this that twice befell. 
Parting is all we know of heaven, 

And all we need of bell. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 
309and 311 Sansome St. San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 unci 16 Threadneedle St.. London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,000,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENQL ND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 439 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insurance. 

Founded A. D. 1799. 

Insurance Gompanu ot North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capl lal 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022.016 

JAMES D BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000.000 

Assets 3. 192.00 1 . 69 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1 ,506,409 41 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager S01 Montgomery Si. 
B J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St. 
PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established nsa. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. t»oor P 3r"ea "»> 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 
413 California St., S. F, 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital M.700XOO 

BALFOUR, 3UTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
No. 316 California St., S. F 

DR RIOORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS.-Buy none but tbegenu- 
rT l,'„ \l ,Vr lne-A spoclnc for Exhausted Vitality. Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forcos. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States 
J. Q. STEELE & CO., 636 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco 
Sent by mall or express anywbore. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, II 25; of 100 pills, 12; of 2fJ0 pills, 
«3 60; of 400 pills. «6; Preparai.-ry Pills. 12. Send for circular. 

You Must Look Neat. 

Suits Cleaned ffi f\f\ 
and Pressed «P I .UU 

Bay. Gitu Clothing Renovatory, 

„ ,. „ „ 22K Geary St., Easterbrook B'ld'g, 

bulls called for and delivered. Rooms 19-20-21. 'Phone Grant 158. 



January 30, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I! . 



1 a 



£aJ 



9««i 




DEAR EDITH :— The new .sin- |ue coats are an immense 
improvement on the models worn last year, the backs 
being more graceful with the Su tings [ailing just in the 
middle, and the sleeves — a largo bishop before, now a full 
graceful bell — have a prettier appearance ainl ai 
coming to many more figures. Some of the most elegant 
sacques are trimmed with a fur tigaro falling in p<>ii 
the fronts and going apart up the back, where they join 
above at the place where the tinted pleats begin. Out 
door coats and capes have collars, revers and epaulettes 
of fur, two kinds of the same color being often taken, and 
the fronts and edges are adorned with bands either put on 
in the same fashion or with fur buttons added. 

The tailors are returning to that severity of cut 
characteristic of their earliest achievements as women's 
tailor's. The coat and skirt are now as they used to be. 
plain and simple, the sleeves reduced almost to the dimen- 
sions of the close-fitting coal shapes of long ago. There 
is no redundancy of basque. It fits close. It is neither 
very long nor absurdly short; its frilliness has quite dis- 
appeared; the revers are neatly shaped. The skirts are 
moderate in width, with the fullness kept well to the back. 
Concession to the prevailing craze for elaboration is ap- 
parent only in the stylish vests which accompany hand- 
some tailor gowns. 

The general tendency is to discard all stiff interlinings 
on the newest gowns. This does very well where one can 
afford a crisp taffeta silk lining in each new dress, but 
when this is not possible, not a few women are protesting 
against the use of nothing but a soft finished percaline 
lining, with no sort of interlining added even as a facing. 
They argue, and justly so, that a skirt so finished has a 
lank, unstylish appearance (especially if of soft wool fab- 
ric) after the so recent vogue of interlined undulating 
skirts with a crisp flare and a certain cachet wholly ab- 
sent in a soft-lined model whose folds or breadths fall limp 
around the feet like those of a Quakeress. There are a 
number of fashionable modistes who have come to the 
rescue in this matter. They have made an underskirt 
nearly as long as the dress skirt, employing crinoline, hair 
cloth, moreen, etc., as may be preferred, for the founda- 
tion. This skirt can be covered with silk of some dark 
shades, and if well cared for will last a long time. This 
skirt is gored on the front and sides with a deep flounce at 
the bottom, and the three or four shirred or box-pleated 
ruffles at the back are run through the inch-wide hem at 
their edges with a single band of featherbone. Worn 
under the dress, all the slightly flaring effect of an inter- 
lined skirt is given. 

Very lovely are many of the severely cut velvet gowns 
made ready for the new year and all its attendant festivi- 
ties. They have a regal magnificence all their own, and 
with but a little rare valuable lace and a very few well- 
selected jewels the effect of such a gown can not be sur- 
passed. The lace need not be cut if very choice, for it is 
now permitted to drape it temporarily with a few deft- 
hidden stitches and some rich jeweled lace-pins. If these 
pins are real gems suitable in color and not aggressive in 
appearance, any number— not excessive — may be em- 
ployed. The twofold advantage of this plan is that it pre- 
serves the lace intact and allows of a different arrange- 
ment from time to time. This year, not only are rich vel- 
vets in ruby, black, brown and green worn, but there are 
lovely pink, pale turquoise and deep peacock blues, mauve, 
heliotrope, yellow, gray and rose-colored shades, the most 
of them made extremely simple; others are elaborated 
with fur, lace and jeweled passementeries. 

Belinda. 

Have you visited the Japanese art store of Geo. T. Marsh <& Co., 
at 625 Market street? If not, you have missed one of the sights of 
San Francisco and have also overlooked an opportunity to purchase 
some of the most valuable curios and art goods at lowestprices. Only 
the best goods are kept on hand and Mr. Marsh has long had the 
confidence of all purchases. Call there to-day. 



Blanket Business. 

1 . 

uupon 
u«, we u 'hem. 



Lol 1 Fine Wblto Wool Blankets, from Ibe Stockton Mills, fro ar 

09 Inches nldc. not many Icfl l\r pair iDO.Zd 

Lot „•— sum, l.nm made for eilra large booB, fr 9 r\r 

tho K) kind, over reel wide Per pair ibrJ./O 

Lot :t-- A heavier crude than lot I, and snmo size (for double JQ or 

beds), solid ami duraiili . ats ::• blanket. Per pair WfJ.OO 

Lol I- About 300 pairs Extm Organ rise l.uml.'s Wool Bliiri 

Uets, T2 inches wide, the 17 50 blanket. Special this week fr. A *) r 

Perpatr «b4./t) 

Lot 5— Heaviest Texture Fin.' White Hlankols. sum.' size as fr A rr\ 

lot 1, on sale at «p4.9U 

Lot 6— Best Grade and Largest Size ol the Entire Purchase. ff/C t\C\ 

solid and heavy Per pair «DO.UU 




MURPHV BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

FINE FURS 
and 

SEALSKIN 
GARflENTS 

to order. Remodeling and 
repairing at prices far be- 
low those of any other fur- 
rier on the Pacific Coast. 
All work guaranteed. 

flD. K060UR, 

FASHIONABLE FURRIER, 

Sy 2 Kearny Street (Up-stairs), 

Opposite Chronicle. Formerly cutter with Revillon Freres, Paris, Lon- 
don. New York. 




THOS. PRICE & SON, 

ASSAY OFFICE, 



Thos. Price. Arthur F. Price 



GHEMIGAL LABORATORY 

BULL-ION ROOMS and ORE FLOORS. 
i'H Sacramento St., S. F, 



Dr. LEANER, 



Most skilled ni ' J 1 i 

Chiropodist 

on the coast 
Manioure attendants. Corns, bunions, ingrowing nails, 
chilblains and warts extracted without pain by the New Treatment. 

Office, 702 Market St. Office hours: 9 a m. to 6 p. m. 
Sundays, U a. m. to 1 p. m. 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE, 

Dentist. 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 



Dentist, 



[)R. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Office and Residenoe : 409^ Post St., San Francisoo. 

Office Hours : 9 to 12 A. m. ; 1 to 6 P. m , 

Weak rien and Women SSStiSVSft'ffiffiUSS: 

edy ; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
: et street, San Francisco. (Send for circular.) 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 




<O0tf£S? <0JV 



EACH morning when I leave my bed, 
And clothe me for the day's vocation, 
I wonder who is maimed or dead, 

And what new, terrible sensation 
My rapt attention will engage. 

My appetite, I'm sure, would fail me 
If, staring from the printed page, 

There were no scandal to regale me. 

I feel quite disappointed when 

I tind no gory tales of killing ; 
No massacre of maids or men, 

Or other dread disasters thrilling. 
Between my sips of coffee, I 

Am charmed to contemplate the question 
Of wholesale crime and butchery — 

Tis such an aid to the digestion. 

Somehow it makes my buttered toast 

Seem all the hotter when I'm reading 
A fiendish and atrocious roast 

Of some poor victim. When I'm "feeding" 
1 lind that I my lone repast 

Cannot enjoy unless, to cheer me 
With fakes at which 1 gaze aghast, 

I have my morning paper near me. 

On tales of faithlessness I gloat; 

With ecstacy I fairly revel 
When some one cuts another's throat. 

To get real friendly with the l'evil 
There is no surer, quicker way 

Than to remain at home in quiet, 
Peruse the journals of the day 

And cram your mind with sin and riot. 

What interest, profound, intense, 

What fond pursuit is mine, what pleasure 
When, in a quiver of suspense, 

I open up my printed treasure! 
My daily paper! Dearer yet 

Than all else in this world so fickle — 
A morgue report and police gazette. 

And scandal-breeder for a nickel ! 



The gay and debonair gentlemen comprising the mem- 
bership of the Produce Exchange are never so happy as 
when one member manages to obtain an advantage over 
another, especially if there is a little joker concealed in 
connection with the transaction. The Call Board men 
are much diverted over a twin case of this character, at- 
tributed to the close friendship of Albert Gerberding, 
President of the Exchange, and William Berg, "the Ger- 
man traveler." The story goes that Berg strolled into 
Gerberding's office, and, with apparent innocence, picked 
up the cover of an ink well, having a conical lop. Berg 
carelessly spun it around on the 

"Tell you what, Al," he said, as if the idea had just oc- 
curred to him; "I'll bet you five dollars that ink cover 
turns the other way before it stops spinning." 

" Done," unhesitatingly replied Gerberding. who is al- 
ways game for a wager, but who did not think his friend 
was serious. 

Of course the impromptu top, as it ceased to spin, gave 
a backward revolution. 

"That's a neat trick, Billy. Learn it in Germany ? " 
quizzed Gerberding 

Berg claimed and received the money, despite Gerberd- 
ing's mild protest that it was "a job and a sure thing 
bet." As the President of the Prodice Exchange is 1101 
more fond of the worst of a bargain than any other man 
on the Call Board, he did some hard thinking" about that 
wager, which ended in his laboriously filing the conical 
top from the cover of his ink well. The next time Berg 
came in, Gerberding glanced at him in apparent abstract 
tion. 

" I had something I wanted to ask you, Billy," he said, 
finally. "Oh, 1 remember now. It was about that trick of 
yours. I can't do it, and I don't believe you can repeat it." 



Berg turned away to hide his joy, and laughed softly to 
himself as he reflected on what a good thing his friend 
was. He wished he could share it with the boys. 

" We will make it $10 this time, if you like, Al," he 
said, and to this proposition Gerberding agreed. 

Then Berg spun the cover again, but with dire results. 
The loss of the pointed top cost him the bet. Now he is 
denouncing Mr. Gerberding for making him the victim of 
a conspiracy, but he has paid up the bet and stood a good 
luncheon into the bargain. He has concluded that Ger- 
berding is not such a good thing as he appears, while the 
latter smiles easily and jingles Berg's gold eagle, but 
says nothing. 

* * * 

"Uncle" George Bromley, James M. Hamilton, who is 
heir apparent to Uucle George at the Bohemian Club, and 
who will be "Uncle Jimmy" some day, and Hugo Toland, 
were spending the evening at a Pacific Avenue home, the 
mistress of which is noted for her strict devotion to her 
rigid religious views. The three clubmen were regarded 
with just a trifle of suspicion in that atmosphere, and be- 
ing perfectly aware of the light in which they were re- 
garded, and fearful of infringing on the ethics of the occa- 
sion, they were on their very best behaviour. By way of 
diversion, the hostess produced a planchette board, which 
is supposed to spell answers to questions, the theory being 
that the mechanism operates through hypnotic influence 
transmitted by the persons touching the board. A num- 
ber of questions had been asked by various guests and 
answered with due propriety by the planchette board. 
The clubmen were fearfully bored, although they were 
careful to give no indication to their hostess of their long- 
ing for the comfortable "Social Hall" of the Bohemian 
Club. As luck would have it, according to the affidavits 
of the trio, only Uncle George, Jimmie, and Hugo, had 
their hands on the board when the lady of the house in- 
quired if the following day would be fine. All present fixed 
their eyes on the board, which slowly spelled the letters : 

"G-o t-o h-e " 

Before the last word was completed, the hostess in- 
dignantly snatched up the planchette board, and disdain- 
fully turned her back on the assembled worldlings. In vain 
they protested their innocence, in ?horus and individually. 
The hostess maintained that they had been caught in fla- 
granti delicto. Each of that unhappy trio is now distinctly 
persona non grata in that religious home. 

* * * 

The appearance of Thomas R. Bacon of the University 
of California is such that while his pupils admire him as a 
lecturer on history, they are always careful to remain at a 
safe distance from their instructor. This feeling of con- 
straint is mutual, and it is said that where young women 
students are concerned, the formidable professor is an 
avowed coward. Apropos of this weakness, the Univer- 
sity town is laughing over an episode related by a young 
"co-ed." who was unable, through sickness, to take the 
Christmas examination iu ancient history, and who there- 
fore arranged for a supplemental examination on the re- 
sumption of class work at the beginning of the present 
term. At the appointed hour she repaired to the history 
class room and met Professor Bacon on the steps, pre- 
paring to go out. 

"Oh, I came for my examination in ancient history," 
she said, in answer to Bacon's look of inquiry. 

As she spoke, the Professor ran quickly down the steps. 

" Yes, I remember," he said, over his shoulder. "When 
did the Pilgrims land ? " 

Without waiting for a reply, be continued his flight, and 
as he turned the corner of the building he shouted back : 

" That's all right. You pass." 

* * * 

Application? for rooms at the Hotel Rafael are being 
received thus early by mine host Warfield from some of 
our swagger set, and present appearances indicate that 
quite a fashionable coterie will be in residence at that 
favorite place during the Lenten season so rapidly ap- 
proaching, to recuperate from society dissipations and be 
"fit " for the summer gaieties. 

Great redactions in fashionable furnishing goods at John W. 
Canuany's,25 Kearny St. 



Janua- 



KRAXCISCO \! \VS LRTTER. 



'7 



With a laudable ende;i 
whatever he undert.i 
roistering younp blade of I 

several CM] an attempt at | 

injr the town a blight irdinal hue. A 

panicil by a choice eacort, he traversed tin- entire co 
route one night While ii noted chiefly foi 

elaborate practical ji ..1 his knucl 

rapped when he tried to pick up his glass, and then en- 
joyed the delightful experience of having the floor sink- 
beneath his feet when lie attempted to examine a picture. 
Every one laughed except Hancock, who. in spite of many 
drinks, thirsted for revenue When the Los Ail 
said he saw the barkeeper touch a spring which caused a 
carved post to violently bump the back of the Banning 
head, all present assured him his impression was due to 
his alcohol-heated imagination. The victim was not at all 
impressed by the explanation, but he feigned acquiesc 

"Got em ajrain. have 1 1 " he yelled, in assumed terror. 

Then in a pretended paroxysm, he assaulted the bar- 
keeper and his friends in turn, and under cover of his 
affected delirium, administered much deserved castigation 
to the practical jokers. Before Hancock "recovered." 
the clothing of the entire party was in a lamentable condi- 
tion, and the saloon suggested the wreck of a gasoline 
schooner. But Banning is serenely conscious that he has, 
by the episode, earned an immunity from practical jokes 
in the future, so he paid for the broken glassware and 
damaged decorations with a light heart, if with a similarly 

weighted purse. 

* * * 

Apropos of the trial of J. J. Cooney, formerly a Notary 
Public, on the charge of perjury based on the alleged 
printer's date marks of a notarial certificate, the story 
has been revived of how the late A. A. Cohen secured his 
start in life. Cohen was a struggling law student in Eng- 
land and articled as a clerk to a firm of attorneys. A 
famous will trial was in progress in London involving the 
disposition of a vast estate. Everyone believed the will a 
forgery but no one had been able to secure any direct 
proof of its lack of authenticity. The will had been 
offered for probate twice to the Court and at the final 
hearing of the case, all possible points against it had been 
made, but the objections were ineffectual and the spurious 
will was about to be accepted. Young Cohen's employers 
were opposed to the fraudulent will and in a moment of 
abstraction, the clerk held the document up to the light, 
saw the date mark and noted that it was subsequent to the 
date of the alleged will. There was no difficulty then in 
securing the rejection of the bogus document. For his 
lucky and accidental service, young Cohen was paid five 
thousand pounds. He came to California and with his re- 
ward laid the foundation of the fortune which enabled him 
to build railroads, buy lands and amass an estate of 
several millions. 



As everybody who has sojourned in the saintly city of 
Sacramento knows, there is an ordinance there which pro- 
hibits men from expectorating on the sidewalks or in pub- 
lic places. There is also a law which exempts Legislators 
from being arrested fifteen days prior to, during, or fif- 
teen days after the sitting of Legislature. A few days 
ago, an eminent divine from this city was walking along one 
of the main streets, when he had occasion to clear his 
throat of some phlegm located there. This he proceeded 
to do, but was immediately pounced upon by a zealous 
policeman. While being yanked off to the judgment seat 
he espied a man literally cover a store window with a 
stream of offensive tobacco juice. 

"Look at that!" he cried to hiscapturer. 
you take him too ? " 

"Shure, an he's only an Assimblyman, " 
policeman. And the clergyman regrets 
missed his vocation. 



"Why don't 

answered the 
now that he 



Swain's Bakery on Sutter street is the best known restaurant in 
town and is patronized by only the very best people. Between the 
hours of 5 and 8 p. m. a first class table d'hote dinner is served for 
the small sum of $1.00. Swain's Bakery also enjoys the reputation 
of furnishing the finest pastries and delicacies in the city. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's SoothiDg Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 




Of vitality and energy, a good appetite, and per- 
fect health are obtained and endure by taking 



Peruvian 
Bitters. 



Army and Navy Club 



Is the only 



WHISKEY 



on the market, every package of which bears 
an affidavit guaranteeing it to be absolutely 
PURE and over SIX YEARS OLD. 

MEYERFELD, MITCHELL & CO., 

116 FRONT St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"Wonderful Beautifler, 



The Famous Skin Food. 



50 cents and $1.00 



EGYPTIAN 
ENAMEL. 

MEDIGflT&D" 

PFRFflTF i 50 cents and $1.00 

Trade supplied by REDINGTON & CO where I have no Agent, 
MP'S, ill. J. DUtlCr San Franoisco, Cal.,'rj. S. A. 

REMOVAL.^ 



-MAGONDRAY & GO. 



Importers Teas, Mattings and Silks. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 

Agents North China Insurance Company (Limited), 

Have removed to 

116 California Street, San Francisco, Gal 



Pacific Towel Company 



No. 9 



Lick Place 



Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates: Clean hand 
towels each week, $1 per month; 12 clean hand towels each week; 
$1 50 per month; 4 clean roller towels each week, $1, 6 months 
6 clean roller towels each week, $1 25 per month. 

Tr U the SflN FRflNGISGO LAUNDRY, 

Office, 33 Geaiy street. Telephone Main 5125. 
Oakland Office— 864 Broadway. Telephone Main 658. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 



-" -/■"» «•' 






First English Newspaper. — During the reign of 
James I., England's first newspaper was born, May, 1622, 
seeing the first issue of the Weekly News. Notwithstand- 
ing that it was illy received, its editor, Nathaniel Butter, 
lived by the business for eighteen years. The venture was 
the outgrowth of a custom among the country gentlemen 
to pay some writer in London for "news letters." and Mr. 
Butter's brave attempt was merely the printing regularly 
for the general public that which before had been written 
in a desultory manner for the private individual. 

Copper Pennies.— There are 119,000,000 old copper 
pennies somewhere. Nobody knows what has become of 
them, except once in a while a single specimen turns up in 
change. A few years ago 4,500,000 bronze two-cent pieces 
were set atloat. Three millious of these are still outstand- 
ing. Three million three-cent nickel pieces are scattered 
over the United States, but it is very rarely that one is 
seen. 

Asbestos ami Porcelain. — A French chemist has ob- 
tained from asbestos a substance closely resembling porce- 
lain. The libers of asbestos are very fine and that sub- 
stance may be ground into an almost impalpable powder. 
This is made into paste with water, thoroughly kneaded 
and molded into the required form. It is then heated in 
crucibles to 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. The result is a 
with the translucency of porcelain, 

Saw Dl ST 1 OB I 1 1 D. — Sawdust is turned into transport 
able fuel in Germany by a very simple process. It is 
heated under high steam pressure until the resinous in- 
gredients become sticky, when it is pressed into bricks. 
nan, with a two-horse power machine, can turn out 
9,000 bricks B (lay. 

PoiSOM Ivy. — Poison ivy is said to be antidoted by the 
brook balsam, spotted touch-me-not, or jewel weed (Impar 
tient fulva), which grows freely in this latitude along the 
banks of brooks. Its leaves and stems are bruised and 
applied as a poultice to the inflamed parts. 

Cork for PAVEMENTS. — Some of the pavement in use 
on the streets of Vienna is composed of granulated cork 
mixed with asphalt and other cohesive substances. It is 
compressed into blocks of convenient size. Its advantages 
are cleanliness, durability and economy. 

Concerning Weeks. — The Greeks and Romans had no 
weeks until they borrowed this division of time from the 
East. The Greeks divided the months into three equal 
periods; the Romans into three very unequal — the 
Kalends, Ides and Nones. 

Ska Signaling by Flags.— The flags to be hoisted at 
one time in signaling at sea never exceed four. It is an 
interesting arithmetical fact that, with eighteen various 
colored Hags, and never more than four at a time, no fewer 
than 78,642 signals can be given. 

Longest Telephone Commtjnic uion. — The longest com- 
mercial distance at which the long-distance telephone is 
now operated is from Boston to St. Louis, a distance of 
1,400 miles. This line is more than twice as long as any 
European telephone line. 

Salt in the Sea. — Every ton of Atlantic water, when 
evaporated, yields SI pounds of salt; a ton of Pacific 
water, 79 pounds: Arctic and Antarctic waters yield B5 
pounds to the ton, and Dead Sea water, 1ST pounds. 

The Original Languages.— It is said by philologists 
that there are thirteen original languages, the Greek, 
Latin. German, Slavonic, Welsh, Biscayan, Irish, Albanian, 
Tartarian. Illyrian, Jazygian, Chaucin and Finn 

Through Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 

The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad (Santa Fe route) runs daily 
through from Oakland to Chicago first-class drawing room and 
second-class modern upholstered tourist sleeping cars. Lowest rates 
to all points in the United stales, Canada, Mexico, or Europe. 
Ticket office, ml Market street, opposite chronicle Building. Tele- 
phone Main 1531. 



A SABBATH EVE. 

4 GOLDEN glory lights the west— 
"\ The sun's farewell; 
One cbime sounds clearer than the rest — 

The daytime's knell. 
The eastern skies are crimsoned now 

And edged with grey ; 
The beams that graced the mountain's brow 
Have passed away. 

On Alcatraz the light is lit, 

The Bay is still; 
And soon the trnant mists will flit 

O'er dell and hill. 
So still the town this Sabbath night, 

So calm the air. 
One almost sees the angels light 

Those stars up there! 

HOWARII V. Sl'THKULANn. 



AT THE RACES. 



THE finishing days of the meet of the California Jockey 
Club, at the track across the bay, proved as exciting 
and sensational as their predecessors. Occasionally you 
will hear some grumbling at results; but the trouble is, 
people do not seem to take into consideration the vast 
difference between the Ingleside and Emeryville courses. 
The Oakland course was built for speed. It has a hard 
foundation and a hard dressing, and plays havoc with a 
horse with suspicious underpinning. On the other hand, 
Ingleside has a spongy foundation, which is continually 
yielding the more the track is in use. But still with high- 
class horses the time will not vary much. For instance, 
Chartreuse, who has won a mile in 1.40:| at Ingleside, has 
been beaten in 1.41'. at Oakland with the same weights. 
McGregor has won in 1.40| at Ingleside, and has been 
beaten in 1.40$ at Oakland, so the two do not vary much. 
The whole difference seems to be with the nags with ail- 
ments. The public should be very careful of playing 
horses with bad feet at Oakland. 

The opening days of this week at Ingleside have been 
unusually exciting to the talent, who, on Tuesday last, 
failed to cash on a single favorite, and on Wednesday, 
Greyhurst and Mr. Reel, the only two out of seven, looked 
lonely indeed. But, withal, the sport was all that could 
be desired. 

Secretary Leake deserves great credit for the card 
brought forth on Wednesday. It was no easy task to fill 
out seven races all at a mile and over, and the apprecia- 
tion shown by the vast throng that filled every available 
inch of the grand stand well repaid the efforts put forth 
by the Association. 

The following well-known turfmen are said to be behind 
the game: Riley Grannan, $30,000; Ed. Purser, $30,000; 
John Coleman, $20,000; Will Wallace, $10,000; Charley 
Quinn, $10,000, and lucky Dave Gideon, of Requital fame, 
and the owner of three Futurity winners, is $5,000 behind. 

California-bred horses have won seven-tenths of the 
money offered by the two Associations, and California 
owners have won, so far, four-fifths of the money hung up 
in purses. 

Willie Sims, the crack Eastern jockey, who rode last 
summer for Dwyer at Gravesend, will arrive here within 
the next ten days. He will ride for Lucky Baldwin, who, 
by the way, seems to need a good, reliable trainer more 
than anything else. Sims will be of inestimable value to 
Lucky B., as he can outride any knight of the pigskin in 
the United States, in a race over adistance of ground, and 
Baldwin's horses are nearly all bred for long distances. 



PICTURESQUE SAN FRANCISCO. 

ANOTHER delightful residence locality is pictured in 
our illustrative series this week. The residences are 
all modern, and are inhabited by some of the wealthiest of 
our citizens. 

Paso Robles. 
Our new mud bath house is finished. The arrangement ol baths, 
dressing rooms, etc., are on the same floor. No stairs or steps to 
climb. We are now unquestionably the finest sanitarium or health 
resort on the Pacific Coast. Rest and health seekers are Paso Robles 
seekers, Rates, $10, $12.50, $15, and $17.50 per week. Climate warm. 



January 30. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



THE GIFT OF THE SEA. 
tvorAMo "tune. /« uanct «oo« iiuos 

TBI dead child lay in thr shroud. 
And ihr widow wMrhe.1 Ik* 
And ber mother slept, and ihr channel swept 
The gale in the teeth ol the tide. 

Hut the mother laughed at all. 

" I have lost my man in the sea. 

And the child is dead. He atlll," she said, 

" What more can ye do to mi 

The widow watched the dead. 

And the candle guttered low. 
And she tried to sine the Passing Song 

That bids the poor soul go. 

And "Mary take you now," she sang, 
" That lay ORaihst ray heart," 
And ''Mary smooth your crib to-night," 
Hut she could not say ''Depart." 

Theu came a cry from the sea, 

But the i-ea-rime blinded the glass. 
And "Heard ye nothing, mother?" she said, 
" Tie the child that waits to pass." 

And the nodding mother sighed. 
" 'Tis a lambing ewe in the whin. 
For why should the christened soul cry out 
That never knew of sin '.'" 

" O feet I have held in my hand, 
O hands at my heart to catch ; 
How should they know the road to go, 
And how should they lift the latch?" • 

They laid a sheet to the door, 

M'ith the little quilt atop, 
That it might not hurt from the cold or the dirt, 

But the crying would not stop. 

The widow lifted the latch f 

And strained her eyes to see, 
And opened the door on the bitter shore 

To let the soul go free. 

There was neither glimmer nor ghost, 

There was neither spirit nor spark, 
And "Hark ye nothing mother?" she said, 
" 'Tis crying for me in the dark." 

And the nodding mother sighed. 
" 'Tis sorrow makes ye dull; 
Have ye yet to learn the cry of the tern, 
Or the wail of the wind-blown gull?" 

" The terns are blown inland, 

The gray gull follows the plow, 
'Twas never a bird, the voice I heard; 
Oh, mother, I hear it now." 

" Lie still, dear lamb, lie still; 
The child is passed from harm. 
'Tis the ache in your breast that broke your rest, 
And the feel of an empty arm." 

She put her mother aside, 
" In Mary's name let be; 
For the peace of my soul 1 must go," she said. 
And she went to the calling sea. 

In the heel of the wind-bit pier, 

When the twisted weed was piled, 
She came to the life she had missed by an hour, 

For she came to a little child. 

She laid it into her breast, 

And back to her mother she came. 
But it would not feed and it would not heed, 
Though she gave it her own child's name. 

And the dead child dripped on her breast, 

And her own in the shroud lay stark ; 
And "God forgive us, mother," she said, 
" We l et it die in the dark." 

"Our Society Blue Book" 
For the season of 189S-97 is now ready for delivery. It contains 
the names, addresses and reception days of most of the prominent 
families of this city and other points on the Coast. Also lists of 
members of the most prominent Clubs with their business addresses. 

San Francisco Street and Avenue Guide, Ladies' Shopping Guide, 
etc. Price Five Dollars. C. C. Hoag, Publisher. 

Trade supplied by Haetweli, Mitchell & Willis, Successors to 
Dodge Bros, 225 Post St.. and 107 Montgomery St. 

Kelly's Corn Cure never falls. 25 cents. 102 Eddy street. 



ill top," "pearl ui 

■ smell," 

and "lust light," are great 

Macbeth in 

dudes them all. if you get the 

chimney made lor your lamp. 

Let us send you an Index. 

\ Macbeth Co 





CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS GUIDE 



KKST.W* HANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Aciuliinv BttlUllDg. 334-3M Pine Street Rooms for 

Tallies and families. prli ai<_- entrance. John DcrKe?.. Proprietor. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rntlsseric, Ml O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantinl, Proprietor 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor, Grant avc. and Hush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 180. A. 11 Ui.anco & B Bkun. 

DAIRIES 

Oakland Dairy Depot. :t*J'i Fulton slnet, S. F. Absolutely pure Milk and 
Cream . Telephone. Piue I69j 

DENTISTS. 

Dr. Thomas L. Hill, 

OFFICE: Odd Fellows" Building, southwest cor. Seventh and Market 
streets. Office hours: 9 a. m. to 5 P.M. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 

Dr. R. Cutlar, 818 Sutter street. 

MEDICAL. 

Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St. . near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description cesigned and constructed. 

PRINTING AND RUBBER STAMPS. 
Koch & Harney, (Jas. H.Harney, Geo. T Koch), Job Printers. 648 Sacra- 
mento St. Fine printing and embossing, seals, rubber stamps, stencils, eto. 



Maillard's Chocolates in 



CANDIES. 
; and 1-lb boxes. 



Roberts', Polk and Bush, 



VEHICLES 
Second-hand Victoria, O'Brien & Son's pat. Spring Buggy, Surrey and 
Top Buggy, for sale cheap. 500 Golden Gate avenue. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California, Looa 
tlou of works— Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 26th day of January, 1897, an assessment (No. 61), of 25 cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 33, Nevada Blook, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
2d DAY OF MARCH, 1897, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on the 23d day of March, 1897, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

M. JAFFE, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Julia Consolidated Mining Company 

Assessment No. 28 

Amount por Share 5 centp 

Levied January 21, 1897 

Delinquent in Office February 26, 1897 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March If), 1897 

J. STADTFELDT, Jr., Secretary. 
Office— Room56,NevadaBlock, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of cne Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, McAllis 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, Deo. 30, 1896. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six months ending December 30, 1896, free from all taxes, and payable on 
and after January 2, 1897. ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 

Gold Medals. Paris 1878-1880. These pens are " the best 
, In the world. 1 ' Sole agent for the United States. 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John Street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 




GASTRONOMY and cards were the prominent features 
of last week's gatherings, which may be character- 
ized as one of the dullest of the season; but that is usually 
said when dances are few. At Mrs. Jefferson James's, 
Mrs. Thomas Denigan's, and Mrs. J. P. Young's progres- 
sive euchre parties some very pretty prizes were won by 
the ladies who took part in the games. In the luncheon 
line Mrs. Krutschnitt and Mrs. Clarence Mann were the 
hostesses. Among the dinners was the handsome one of 
Mrs. Moses Heller, whose twenty-five guests were seated 
at a table most elaborately decorated with roses; Miss 
Rose Neustadter's dinner dance of thirty young people 
was in honor of Miss Mattie Ehrman and Albert Frank. 
The decorations were all in white and green; dancing fol- 
lowed the dinner, and an elaborate supper concluded the 
festivities; and Thos. McCaleb, the young New Yorker 
who is passing the winter in San Francisco, was host to a 
party of young people at a dinner given in the red room of 
the Bohemian Club, Mrs. 0. A. Spreckels chaperoning the 
affair. There was an UDUsual lack of teas during the 
week, but the one given by Miss Frances Curry, which 
was in honor of Miss Ea Vert of New Orleans, was, in 
spite of the unpleasant state of the atmosphere last 
Saturday, a charming affair, which may also be said of the 
meeting of the Saturday Evening Dancing Class that 
night. Mr. Dupero's theatre party at the Orpheum was 
in compliment to the bride and groom-elect, Miss Lizzie 
Carroll and Will Whittier, and was followed by supper at 
the University Club. 

This week opened with the dibut of Miss Frances Jolliffe 
at the first night of Mine. Modjeska's season at the Bald- 
win, and theatre parties varying in size from four to a 
dozen or more, were seen all over the house, and of course 
dainty little suppers followed the performance. Tuesday 
was a busy day. During the afternoon came the recep- 
tion at Mrs. Stanford's, and in the evening the Goodall- 
Keil wedding, and the reception of the Laurel Hall Club in 
honor of Mrs. Lowenberg. The reception at Mrs. Stan- 
ford's was an exceedingly large one. and between the hours 
of four and seven o'clock the rooms were thronged with 
guests, who came to do honor to Bishop and Mrs. New- 
man, who were the guests of the occasion. Although the 
beautiful rooms scarcely needed any additional decoration, 
foliage and flowers of every hue were used in lavish pro- 
fusion throughout the entire house, though roses were the 
blossoms chiefly in evidence. Mrs. Stanford received her 
guests in the India room, refreshments were served from 
a buffet in the banquet hall, the orchestra was stationed in 
the art gallery, and during the afternoon the University 
Glee and Mandolin Club gave a number of selections. Mrs. 
Stanford, who was assisted by a bevy of charming belles 
in her duties of hostess, wore a gown of heavy black satin 
and diamond ornaments. Mrs. Newman was robed in 
black velvet trimmed with duchesse lace. 

Beethoven Hall, where the Laurel Hall Club reception 
was held in the evening, was very prettily dressed with 
flowers and potted plants, and the entertainment con- 
sisted of recitations, reading of essays and vocal music, 
and last of all an elaborate supper, at which many toasts 
were offered and wittily responded to. 

But it is weddings that have been the leading features 
of the present week, and there have been several de- 
partures from the now rather worn out "pink and white, 
so favorite a nomenclature in society weddings for some 
time past. First came the violet wedding of Miss Seremi 
Goodall and Hugo Keil. which was solemnized at the home 
of the bride on McAllister street, on Tuesday evening. 
The bay window in the large drawing-room to the left of 
the hall was the place selected for the ceremony. It was 
transformed into a violet bower of smilax and purple 
violets, held in place by broad bands of white and lavender 1 
ribbons, a lovely bell of white violets was suspended from 



the center and beneath it the Rev. George Walk of Trinity 
Church tied the nuptial knot. Smilax, carnations and 
beauty roses were used in profusion for the adornment of 
the other rooms in which were assembled the relatives and 
intimate friends of the contracting parties. Promptly at 
the hour named, Miss Nellie Boyd, who was the maid-of 
honor, entered the room followed by the bride and her 
father, the orchestra in the hall playing the Lohengrin 
Chorus, and were met by the groom and his best man. his 
brother Edward, who awaited their coming. The bride 
looked very handsome in a robe of white brocaded satin, 
trimmed with Venetian point lace, a diamond cresent, the 
gift of the groom, gleamed in her hair amid the folds of 
her fleecy tulle vail, and she carried a boquet of white 
violets. Miss Boyd's gown was of white satin, trimmed 
with Brussells lace, and her bouquet was of purple violets. 
After the couple had been made one, congratulations fol- 
lowed, then came an elaborate supper, after which there 
was dancing. The presents were exceedingly handsome, 
consisting of jewelry, silverware, cut glass and bric-a-brac 
in endless variety. Mr. and Mrs. Keil are passing their 
honeymoon at Coronado and upon their return will reside 
in Belvedere. 

The second change in color was made by Miss Lizzie 
Carroll, who chose yellow as the hue for her wedding, 
which took place at the home of her mother on Van Ness 
Avenue, at noon on Wednesday. The limited space at the 
disposal of the decorators, for the house is a small one, 
was made the most of. and an original idea, certainly, was 
to have the ceremony performed beneath ripe fruit, as 
well as the blossoms which adorned the branches of the 
orange tree placed in the front parlor. Archbishop Rior- 
dan was assisted by Father Mulligan in the service which 
converted Miss Lizzie Carroll into Mrs. Will Whittier. The 
bridal robe was of white satin, trimmed with lace and 
orange blossoms. Miss Gertrude Carroll, as maid-of-honor, 
wore a costume of white mousseline (/■ tote, and the Misses 
Romie Wallace and Julia Crocker, who officiated as brides- 
maids, were gowned alike in yellow tulle over yellow satin. 
Milton Latham was the groom's best man. Following the 
ceremony came congratulations, and then the dejeuner was 
served, during which the orchestra played a selection of 
appropriate airs, and later in the day, which proved to be 
the wettest of the month, the bride and groom departed 
to spend the honeymoon at the ranch of the bride's uncle, 
Pat Murphy, near Santa Barbara, and next month Mr. 
and Mrs. Whittier will start on a six months' tour of 
Europe. 

Wednesday evening's weddings were those of Miss Rose 
Eppinger and Dr. Sharp, and of Miss Martha Shainwald 
and Leopold Meyers, and a very handsome wedding took 
place on Thursday evening, when Miss Mattie Ehrman and 
Albert Frank were married at the San Francisco Verein 
Club, in the presence of a large number of guests. Miss 
Agnes Brandenstein was maid of honor, and the Misses 
Olga Sutro, Martha Triest, Grace Hecht, and Ida Low 
were bridesmaids. 

Miss Sadie Hyman and Wilfred Mack will be wedded next 
Wednesday evening, the ceremony to take place at the 
San Francisco Verein Club; the Bloomingdale-Klein and 
the Scott-Castle weddings are also named to take place 
the same date. 

From Salt Lake has come the news of the marriage 
there this week of Miss Carrie Quinan, who was quite a 
figure in San Francisco society three years ago, and who 
was recently divorced, to Lieutenant Clement Flaglor, 
who is also not quite unknown in our social world. 

Society has sustained a severe loss in the death of Mrs. 
Mary Emma Flood, widow of the late capitalist. A few 
days ago she contracted a severe cold, which finally de- 
veloped into pneumonia, and which caused her death on 
Wednesday night last. Her children were at her bedside 
when she died. The deceased will long be remembered for 
her generous disposition, and for the numerous gifts of 
charity bestowed upon the needy. 



Maybe you've forgotten how good tea can be. 
Get Schilling "s Best of your grocer and bring 
back the good old times. 



January $ 



I- raw: 



-t ni»;ht the Kritl;i. 
thmr dances at Lout's i 1,. bring .. 

domino party, was highly I . ,1 bill feu of the mem- 

bers failed to put In And the ' 

cotillion of the Eotn «as danced in the Maple 

Hall. To-nik'ht. Mr>. Jos - a ball in Maple Hall 

at which her daughter, His 
social dehut. Another society debut will take 
Saturday, when Consul and Mr*. .1. Simpson will givi 
in their handsome new home on V alien street, for the pur 
pose of introducing their daughter, Mis> apson. 

The Pacific Dancing Club on Tuesday evening, and the 
Cotillion Club on Friday evening, will have dames at Odd 
Fellow's Hall next week. 

At the Baldwin Theatre, Machah Monday, Tuesday and 

Saturday nights; Adrienm I. irreun Thursday night, and 

' to-night, Wednesday and Friday nights, and 
Saturday matinee. Modjeska's Lady Macbeth was en- 
thusiastically greeted the last time' she played here: 
Howarth's Macbeth is of national fame. Adritnni has 
tender memories for most of our play-goers, as it was this 
play which introduced ModjesUa to the English-speaking 
stage, and Marie Stuart has always been a favorite role. 

The Stanford Choral Association (one hundred and fifty 
voices), and the Apollo Choral Society, are planning to 
unite in giving two grand choral concerts sometime in 
April. One of the concerts will be given in this city aud 
one at Stanford University. The Apollo Society will in- 
crease its membership to its full limit — one hundred and 
fifty voices. Singers who wish to associate themselves 
with a chorus of earnest students of the highest class of 
music, are invited to become members. 

Miss Minnie Burton has returned from her visit to Fort 
Logan, where she has been for the last three months, and 
if rumor can be relied on, she will return there ere long. 
Though the official "announcement" has not yet been 
made, it no doubt will be in the very near future. 

The Maria-Kip Orphanage is to be benefited by a 
theatrical performance next month, when Caste will be 
given at the Bush-street Theatre, with Miss Leila Burton 
and Miss Rose Hooper in the leading female parts. Frank 
Mathieu will also appear in the comedy. 

. A FINE CANVAS. 

S CANVAS is at present on exhibition in the studio of 
Amadee Joullin, which is one of the strongest and 
most interesting ever painted by our local artists. The 
canvas depicts a young Moqui Indian brave bending over 
the form of a dying chief in the interior of an Indian hut. 
The light falls on the two forms, the one outstretched upon 
an Indian blanket, the other kneeling at his head. The 
two figures almost seem to live. The muscles and sinews 
of the elder man show up in strong contrast to the delicate 
limbs of the younger, and on his face can be seen that 
grim determination which will not even be conquered by 
death. The color in the picture is perfect. There is no 
attempt made at false impressionism. The artist has 
painted life and approaching death as it is, not as it might 
be. To this is probably due the silent strength of the 
picture. < 

Mr. Joullin is not a mere painter; he is an artist in the 
higher conception of the word. We have seen and studied 
his work for many years, and always find something fresh 
in it to admire. In bis dune pictures he suggests the 
dreariest and coldest desolation, or the terrible sultriness 
of a too hot summer; m his pen and ink work he is delicate, 
while still being strong, and now we feel sure that he will 
give us a series of Indian pictures, which will not only 
bring him new laurels, but will also add considerably to 
the fame of San Francisco. We shall look forward with 
expectancy to the next picture. The subject is one of 
home interest, and has never been treated as it should be. 

To use any other complexion beautifier than Camelline is to run 
the risk of harming your skin. This favorite and indispensable ad- 
junct to a lady's toilet Has been pronounced harmless by the most 
eminent physicians and chemists and its success reflects much 
credit upon its originators, Wakelee & Co. It has taken prizes at 
many exhibitions and is absolutely without a peer. 

The Press Clipping bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
»nd personal. 




TE£Tffi?BRFATH. 



If unable to obtain SOZOOONT of your Druggist, one 
complete package largo bottle with box of powder will 
be sent prepaid by express or mail on receipt of regular 
retail price, 75c. m cash or stamps, hall* ruckii, Prop*., 
215 WiMngton St.. New York, 40 Mpiborn Vl«d UC l London. Eng. 



CI I * H*L ± The "Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

O I U IT\ D 1 3 I hea L re , Friedlander. Gottlob & Co. , Lessees 
and Managers. 

Next Thursday afternoon at3:30, 

FIRST SYMPHONY CONCERT. 

55 musicians. Gustav Hinrlchs, Conductor. 

Soloist: Katharine Flemming Hinhichs, contralto. 

Brilliant programme 

Reserved seats, 81 and 50 cents. General admission, 50 cents. 

Box office now open. 

Pacific Goast dockey Glub. 

(Ingleside Track). The only perfect winter race track in 
America. Racing from January 25th to February 6th, inclusive. 

FIVE OR MORE RAGES DAILY, 

rain or shine. First race at 2 p m. 

Take Southern Pacific trains at Third and Townsend streets 
depot, leaving at 1 and 1 :s0 o'olock p. M. Fare for round trip, in- 
cluding admission to grounds. SI. Take Mission street electric 
line direct to track The Tarpey Stakes Saturday. January 30. 
The Hobart Stakes Saturday, February 6. 
A. B. Spbeckels, President. W. S. Leaks, Secretary. 



SVHtl013fWOifd3Hl M SWmMfSnOIJM 




WAS. 




Wolfe's. 
Schiedam 



TO ENABLE CONSUMERS JO DISTINGUISH AT 



Aromatic SGlinapps. 



Its extraordinary medicinal efficacy in 

GraVeli Gout, Chronic Rheumatisrrtr 
Incipient Dropsy, Flatulence, Golic Pains 
in the stomach and bowels, whether in adults or infants, is acknowledged 
by the whole medical faculty, and attested in their highest written authori- 
ties. For sale by all leading druggists and grocers. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & GO., Agents, 

327-329 Market St. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 




of curiosities 
when he mar- 
Bell— That's 



"Why, Clara, dear, what has happened? It is not a 
month since your marriage, and I rind you in tears al- 
ready ! " "Ah, Hilda, darling ! George is standing as 
member for the county, you know, and I've only just 
learned from the opposition papers what a really dreadful 
man I have married ! " — Pearson's Weekly. 

"What is an anarchist, anyway ? " "An anarchist is one 
who howls, who lias no regard for authority, and who in- 
coherently gabbles night and day." "Yes: we have one 
at our house." "What is his name '.' " " Isn't named yet. 
He's our baby.'' — New York Tribune. 

" 1 want to see the lady of the house," said the wander- 
ing gentleman. "I am she," answered the lady. "In- 
deed? You look so perfectly happy and independent that 
I hope you will excuse me taking you for the hired girl." 
— Indianapolis Journal. 

" I've missed more fun this summer than you could shake 
your tail at," mused the bull. "How ? " asked the family 
horse. "To-day for the seventh time I let one of these 
new women get almost across the field before I realized 
she wasn't a man." — Pearson's Weekly. 

" That fellow puzzles me. I can't make out whether he's 
a philosopher or a fool." "That's easy to find out." 
"How?" " Call him the latter. If he makes a fuss he 
isn't the former." — Chicago Journal. 

"What is Bexton hustling around SO in the interest of a 
curfew ordinance for ? " " His boy saw him coming out of 
a variety theatre the other night and went home and told 
about it." — Indianapolis Journal. 

Daisy Bell — What a remarkable collection 
your husband has. Was he in the business 
ried you ? Mhs. Sourwbin — Oh, yes. Daisy 
what I thought. — Exchange. 

He — If there's anything I detest its a flirty woman! 
She— Humph ! Why not a flirty man? He— Oh, well, a 
man has some excuse. Women are so attractive, you 
know. — Odds and Ends. 

Poet — Let me tell you, sir, that poem cost me a week's 
hard labor. EDITOB (who has read it)— Is that all? If 
I'd have had the passing of the sentence you'd have got a 
month.— Tid-Bits. 

Ethel — Oh, they have the most exasperating piano in the 
flat next door! Laura — In what way is it exasperating? 
1. — Oh, its alwavs going, but it never goes. — New 
York Herald. 

" Why do you hate soap so? " asked the inquisitive lady. 
"I don't." said Mr. Dismal Dawson. "I simply ignore it. 
We don't move in the same set; that's all. "—Indianapolis 
Journal. 

Wallace — I notice that Hargreaves isn't wearing his 
diamond. Ferhv— No; he pawned it last week. "I 
wonder what he got on it'" " Drunk."— Cincinnati En- 
quirer. 

"Do you know that your confounded dog barks all 
night?" --Yes. I suppose he does. But don't worry 
about him. He sleeps all right in the day time."— Tid-Bits. 

Her Papa — Has my daughter given you any encourage- 
ment, sir? Me. Loveday — Well— er — she said you were 
an awfully generous parent.— Odds and Ends. 

Guest (complainingly)— This bill of fare is all in French. 
Waitbe (reassuringly) -Niver you moind that, sur; the 
cook is Oirish. — New York Weekly. 

" Is this a free translation .' asked the girl in the book- 
store. "No. miss," replied the clerk; "it costs fifty 
cents." — Boston Traveler. 

"He's a man after my own heart, pa." "Are vou sure 
it's not my pocket-book ?"— Town Topics. 

Minnie — The man I marry must be a hero. Maide — 
Yes, indeed. — Boston Globe. 

He — I always keep my word. Sue — Won't anybody 
take it? — Town Topi 



She— I'm afraid you can not bring real love to me. You 
have been married once. He— Yes; but that, you kjpow, 
was only a curtain raiser. SnE — And this is to be what — 
a comedy or a tragedy? Thanks, I'd rather not appear 
in either. — Boston Transcript. 

"Say, Mistah Johnsing, I's done turned ober a new leaf." 
"No! Den pay me dat haf dollah you borrowed las' 
yeah." "Sch-h-h!" I hain't de same man I wuz!"— 
Harper's Weekly. 

"It is said that we must all pass away as a tale that is 
told." "That sounds all right; but tales that are told 
don't pass away — they are forever being told over again." 
— Chicago Record. 

"Say, Tompkins, what did Brown die of?" "Well, he 
was fishing, and the ground gave way under him, I think 
— oh, sort — er — bank failure, I suppose!"— Boston Globe. 

"I tell you that a juror in a murder case has an awful 
responsibility on him." "Yes, indeed. If he goes to 
sleep he is liable to be fined for contempt of court." — 

"Stop," cried the old maid as the burglar made for the 
window. "Can't," replied the burglar; "I'm a married 
man." — Town Topics. 

Madge — How proud Mame is since she ordered her bicy- 
cle ! Tom — Well, you know pride goes before a fall. — 
Yonkers Statesman. 

Brown — Do you think a man ought to open his wife's let- 
ters? Jones — Not if she asks for money in them. — Town 
Topics. 

When a man asks for a whiskey he naturally wants the best. 
This has long been known to be the J. F. Cutter brand, the purity 
and strength of which is unequalled. The "Cutter" has been on this 
market for a quarter of a century and E. Martin & Co., the agents, 
411 Market St. state that its popularity increases every year. Try it 
once and you will never accept any other. 

BANKING. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up, 13,000,00 Reserve Fund, 8500,000. 

Southeast Cor. Bosh and Sansome Sts. 

HEAD OFFICE 80 LOMBARD Street, London 

Branches— Victoria. Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nan 
lamo, and Nelson, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Sandon, B. C; 
Kaslo, B. C. 

This Bank transac ts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— FlrstNatlonalBank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital &3,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (October 1, 1894).. 3,158,129 70 

CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Pres't 

THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

I. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev.)— 
Agency of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank, and 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Australia and New Zealand— Bank of 
New Zealand ; China, Japan, and India— Chartered Bank of India, Austra- 
lia and China; St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston. Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christian!*, Melbourne, Sydney. Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities In Italy. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital 11,000,000 

Successor to Sattaer & Co., Established 1851, & in Francisco. 

James K. Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowqill. Cashier. P. W. Wolfe. Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E. A. Brugutere, P. W. Sumner, Albert Mil- 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V. H. Metcnlf, James K. Wilson. 

agents: New York— J. P Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 



WILLIAM ALVORD President 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secr»tary 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass't Cashier 



January 30, 1897. 



SAN PRANC1 rBR. 



*3 



THE NEW WOMAN -ma iwu. 

She talked with great intetiMiy of ea.-h nun'. 
base propenMiy.an.ljpoke with Tolubil- 
ity of woman'* higher plane: 

She dwell on domesticity with mental elas- 
ticity, anil laid that inch frlii-itv was 
really .(nite In vain. 

Wiih Bcslures oratorical and phrases met- 
aphorical, ibc rolccd the powers 
numerical that woman had ontold, 

Ami spok< with realdrainaliral ol voting a JS- 
tematical, and bnllol-boxes spherical, 
votes not bought with 

She said in each vicinity the doctors of divin- 
ity would come from femininity; in 
bloomers they would be; 

And matrons with rapidity would lose all 
their timidity, and no more assinmnv 
in Congress would we see. 

And while with such audacity she showed her 
great capacity, and talked with great di- 
dacity. her husband learned to sweep; 

And while with such agility she dwelt on her 
utility with such intense pugnacity he 
puts the twins to sleep. 



11 TF there's anything I pride myself upon, 
1 tain of the steamship, as he peered through the 



said the cap- 
ough the fog 
and rang the bell for more steam, "it's the accuracy of 
my dead reckoning. Xow, unless I am greatly mistaken, 
we ought to make the Point inside of five minutes." Just 
then the ship struck. "Ah. I thought so," coolly observed 
the navigator. "My reckoning was right. But there 
must be something wrong with the compass or the cur- 
rents." 



THE interesting collection at the Golden Gate Park 
Museum has lately been enriched by a donation consis- 
ting of sixty original water colors of birds and animals, 
painted by Professor W. Harring by special permission of the 
authorities of the London Zoological Gardens. Professor 
Harring's reputation as a painter of animals is next to 
that of Landseer and he was once commissioned by the 
Khedive of Egypt to paint his horses. The gift in question 
was presented to the Museum by Mr. J. L. Bardwell. 

ON Thursday last, was given the first of a course of lec- 
tures at Golden Gate Hall, under the auspices of the 
Mercantile Library Auxiliary. Two others are to follow 
by Rev. Charles Wendte and Professor Charles Mills Gay- 
ley, on the 4th and 11th of February respectively. The 
last lecture was well attended, and much interest is taken 
in those to come. 

THE Santa Clara Magazine, published at San Jose, will 
henceforth be issued as the California Review. The 
Santa Clara was always bright, entertaining, and forceful, 
and Mrs. Carrie Stevens-Walter will continue as editor of 
the new venture. 



MANY of the messenger boys are said to be suffering 
from the effects of their run to the Stanford residence 
last Wednesday. Few of them were in proper training 
and the constitutions of one and all were undermined by 
cigarette smoking and a general participation in all sorts 
of vice. A dinner to the newsboys is now in order. 

EXPERIENCE has taught us that when Supervisors 
commence to find fault with the actions of their pre- 
decessors, they are only preparing to feather their own 
little nests. Dr. Rottanzi's virtuous protestation against 
the late Board causes us to tremble visibly. 

The Overland Limited, 

ONLY 3J£ DAYS TO CHICAGO. i% DAYS TO MEW YOKE. 

The Union Pacific is the only line running vestibuled Pullman 
Double Drawing-room Sleepers and Dining Cars daily. San Fran- 
cisco to Chicago without change. Vestibuled buffet smoking and 
library cars between Ogden and Chicago. Upholstered Pullman 
Sleepers, San Francisco to Chicago, without change, daily. Steam- 
ship tickets on sale to and from all points in Europe. For tickets 
and sleeping car reservations apply to D. W. Hitchcock, General 
Agent, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



BANKING. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

r STRKT. UUI KtAHKI. MacnAKIC*' iKM-ITm Men. DIBO. 
Guaranteed Capital. •1,000.000. Pald-Up Capital, 1300,000. 
■ rnrlHfl 
JAMES D PHBLAN, 1'no.lilenl. IS. O. MURPIIY, Vice President. 

JOHN A H ,lont. 

Uircctors— James D. Phelnn. L. P. Droller. John A. Hooper, C. O 
Honker, James Mofllt, S CI. Murphy. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McKlroy, 
unit Joseph D. Grant. 



Interest paid nn Term ami Ordinary Deposits, 
curittcs 

llta may be soot by postal order, Wolli "image 

on City ItanUs. When opeuloK »■ iRnatuio 



«ns on »ppmv< 

tahlor 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Cornrh California ani> Wkuii Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1895 BM.JOBJBS 

Guarantee Capital anil Surplus 1 ,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President I E B. POND. Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magcc, O. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardmnn, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable In San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. OiUce hours— 9. a. m. to 3 P. M. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK op san prancisco. 

Cor. Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid- Up Capital (1,000,000. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. P. Crooker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Soott 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansomb Sts. 

Capital authorized $6,000,000 I Paid Up 11,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill.* 'or collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART U aBO „„ D 



IGN. STEINHART 1 Mana „ ors 
P. N, LILIENTHAL f Mana g firB 



WELLS FARGO & CO/8 BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,850,000 

John J. Valentine President 1 Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 



N. Y. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F, Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sdtter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital (2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital (2,000,000 

Reserve Pund (860,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Preres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direot on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM1 
C. ALTSCHUL 



[Managers. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California St.. S. F. 

Capital actually paid up in Cash, 81,000,000. ReserveFund ( 715,000 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895 (30,727,586 59. Guaranteed Capital.. (1,200,000 

DIRECTORS. 

B . A . BECKE B President 

EDWARD KRUSE Vice-President 

DANIEL MEYER 2d Vice-President 

H. Horstman, Ign. Steinhart, Nic Van Bergen, Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ 
D. N.Walter. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbott, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 



Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



E J. McCutchen 
J. B. Lincoln 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1897. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 

(Pacific System.) 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ From January 1, 1897, 



| Arrive 



•<J:00a Nlles. Sao Jose, and way stations 8:45 a 
7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45 P 
7:00 a Benlcia, Vacarllle, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Oroville, and Redding, 

via Davis 6:45 P 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 

Napa, Calistoga. and Santa Rosa 6:15 P 
8:90a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Cbico, 

Tehama, and Red Bluff 4 : 15 P 

•8:80 a Peters and Milton *7:15P 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Raymond 
(for Yosemite), Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
Seles, Demlng, El Paso, New 
rleans, aod East — 4:45 P 

9:00 A Martinez and Stockton 4:45P 

9:00 a Vallejo 6:15 P 

Niles, San Jose Llvermore, and 

Stockton 7:15 P 

•1:00 P Sacramento River steamers *9:0OP 

> 1:00 p Niles, San Jose, and Llvermore.. K:45 a 
T1:30p Port Costa and Way Stations.... t7:45P 
4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano and 

Santa Rosa 9:15 A 

4:0Op Benicia, Vacaville, Woodland, 
Knight's Landing, Marysville, 

Oroville, and Sacramento 11:15A 

4:30p Latbrop, Stockton, Modesto, M< r 
ced, and Fresno, going via Niles, 

returning via Martinez 11:45 A 

6:00 P Los Angeles Express, Tracy, 
". Santa Barbara, and Los 

Angck-s 10.45a 

5:00p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 10:45A 

0:00 P European mail, Ogden and East.. 9:45 a 
6:00 p Hay wards, Niles and San Jose... 7:45 a 

J7:00p Vallejo f7:45p 

7 :00p Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 11:15 A 

tI0:0OP "Sunset Limited." Fresno, Los 
Angeles, El Paso, New Orleans, 
and East § 12:45 p 

Santa Cruz D ivision (Narrow Gauge). 

8:15a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, HoulderCreek, SantaCruz 

and way stations 5:50 P 

•2 :1Bp Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
New Almaden, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal 

way stations *1 1:20 a 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Oatos 9:50 A 

til :45P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose 

and way stations J7 :20 p 

Coast Division (Th ird and Townsend streets). 

6:46 a Sao Jose and way stations (New 

Almaden Wednesdays only) 1:30 P 

8:16a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and 

Srinclpal way stations 7:00p 
an Jose and way stations 6:00 p 

11:80 a Palo Alto and way stations 8*30 P 

•2:30p San Mateo, Menlo Park. San Jose, 
Gilroy. Tres Pinos, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey .Pacific Grove *10 :40 a 

•3:30 p San Jose and way stations 9*45 a 

•4 :30 p San Jose and Way Stations «8 :05 a 

6:80 p San Jose and principal way 

stations *8'45 A 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6 35 a 

tll:45P San Jo se and way stations f7:45P 

San Leandro and Havwards Local. 



(•6-00 AT 
8:00 a 1 
9:00A 
10 :00 a 

(11. 00 A 
2:00 P 
3:00 P 
4:00 P 
6:00 P 
6:30 p 
7:00 p 
8:00 P 
9:00 P 
ttll:16 p 



Melrose, 
Seminary Park, 
Fitchbdrg, 

San Leandho, 

and 

Haywards 



i Runs through to Niles. 
t From NUes 



9 
10 

Ittia 



:15 a 
:45 a 
:45 A 
:45 A 

:46 p 

45 P 
:45 p 
:4h p 
:)5 p 
:45 p 
:4S p 
:45 p 
:50 p 
:00 p 



CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street 
(BllpS). 

•7:15. 9:00, and 11:00 A. m., J1:00, «3:00, 18:00. 
•4:00, 15:00 and «6:00p. m .*«■<«, 

From Oakland— Foot or Broadway 

•6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. m.; 112:00. •1:00. 1200 
»3rf)0.t4:00 •6:00P.M. * ' 

a for Morning. p for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

{Sundays only, 
tt Monday. Thursday, and Saturday nights only 

lays and Satui 
^Sundays and Tbursdn 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for 
and check baggage from hotels and residences. 
Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other information. 



A FISH1N — JAM£S WHITCOMB RILEY. 

Wunst we went a-fisbin'— nie 
An' my Pa an' Ma. all three— 
When they was a picnic, 'way 
Out to Haxtoh'a wood one day. 

An' they was a crick out there. 
Where the Bshee is, an' where 
Little boys 'taint big an' strong, 
Uetter have their folks alonp ! 

My pa he ist fished an' fished, 
An' my Ma she said she wished 
Me an' her was home— an' Pa 
i?aid he wished so worse'n Ma! 

Pa said if you talk, er say 
Anything, er sneeze, er play, 
Hain't no fish, alive or dead, 
Ever goin' to bite! he said. 

Pun' nigh dark in town when we 
Got back home; an' Ma says she 
Now she'll have a fish fer shore— 
An* she bayed one at the store ! 

Nen at supper, Pa he won't 
Eat no fish, an' says he don't 
Like 'em— an' he pounded me 
When I choked— Ma, didn't he? 



THE AMERICAN SLAVE- 

TOM HALL. IN HOME AND COUNTRY. 

His lordship if feeble and old. my dear, 
What odds? All the sooner he'll die. 

And he has a sore need of your gold, my 
dear; 
.See the good you can do if yon try. 

And then a real lady you'll be, my dear, 

Not only by nature but name. 
Mama'll be so proud— you can see, my dear, 

No one thinks it, as you do, a shame. 

So bend your proud head. Are you faint , 
my dear? 

Keep the tears back ; be buoyant and brave, 
Keep that pose. Now a picture we'll paint 
my dear. 

To be called "The American Slave." 
Come, muster pleasanter smile, my dear, 

And put on your prettiest gown. 
Forget about Jack for a while, my dear; 

His lordship has just come to town. 

He's come here to get him a wife, my dear, 
And you have been up for sale. 

With a marvellous income for life, my dear, 
To balance your side of the scale. 



Cyclomania has attacked the govern- 
ment officials in London severely and every 
day six or seven machines are stacked in the 
hall of the foreign office, three or four out- 
side the local government board and as 
many at the India office. A dozen machines 
can always be found within the precints of 
the House of Commons. 



SOLID SILVER 

4 cents. This is aOentlr-mun'g Scarf Pin 

or Ladies' Stick Pin, two incl. 

we only show t bo top. The doubl.- hi , ir t 

is solid sterling silver warranted (05-1000 

fine « Sample by niiiil Four CeuU iu 

Postago Stamps. Address, 

LY.N.Y& CO., 48 Bond St., New York. 




[ArllC 




S. S. " Monowai," 
Thursday February 
4th, at 2 p. h. 

S S "Australia", for 
Honolulu only. Tues- 

(OfipRi)" ^February S3. .1* 

Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa J. D SPRECKELS &BROS.CO., 
Agents. 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St. .San Francisco. 



The Grand Pacific. SftSSJK- 

MRS. ELLA CORBETT, Proprietress. 
Furnished rooms by the day, week, or month. 
Telephone: Grant. 607. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

Tiboron Ferry- Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 A H; 13:35,3:30 
5:10, 6:30 P m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 
11:30 p M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 
and 11:30 PH. 

SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A M; 1:30. 3:30, 5:00, 
6:20 pm. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:15, 7:50, 9:20, 11:10 AM; 12:45, 

3 :40, 5 : 10 p M. Saturdays— Extra trips a 1 1 :5S 

and 6:35 pm. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 AM; 1:40,3:40,5:00, 

6:25 pm. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 



LEAVE S. F. 


In Effect 
Oct. 14, 1896 

Desti'tion. 


Arrive in S. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays. 


Sundays. 


Week 
Days. 


7:30AM 
3:30pm 
5:10pm 


8:00am 
9:30 AM 
5:00pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 AM 
6:10 pm 
7:35 pm 


8:40AM 
10:25 am 
6:23pm 






Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle, 
















8:00 am 


7:35PM 














T»A-|8 ! 0OAM| 1 «S« b »SSi.|T»r« 


6:22PM 


3-IopmI 8:0Oam 1 Guemevllle| 7:35pm 


10:25 AM 
6:22 PM 


7:30 am; 8:00AM l Sonoma, 110:40am 
5:|ii pm| 5:00pm i Glen Ellen, i 6:10pm 


8:40 AM 
6:22pm 


7:30AM| 8:00AM 1 SebastODO , 110:40am 
3:30pm| 5:00pm 1 »« 0tt stopol. | 6:10pM 


10:35AM 
6:33PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyservllle for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers ; at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelsey ville. Soda Bay and Lake- 
port; at Hopland for Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs; atUkiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Upper 
Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, River- 
side, Lierley's, Bucknell's Sashedoin Heights, 
Hullvllle, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot 
Springs. Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, 
Usal. Willitts, Cahto, Covelo, Laytonville, Har- 
ris, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday- to-Mond ay Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle 
Building. 

H.C. WHITING, 

Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Passenger Agent. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf. San Fran- 
cisco for ports in Alaska. 9 a.m.. Feb. 10,25. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound ports, Feb. 4, 10, 
15. 20, 25, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pom- 
ona," at 2 P. M. Feb. 1,5,9, 13, 17, 21. 25, and 
every fourth day thereafter. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
at 9 a. M.;Feb 3, 7, 11, IS, 19, 23, 27, ana every 
fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles) and Newport, Feb. 1.5, 9, 13, 1", 21, 25, 
and every fourth day thereafter, at 11 A. m. 

For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay. San Jose del 
Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La Paz, Santa Rosalia. 
and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 
a. M-, 25th of each month. 

The company reserves the right to change, 
without previous notice, steamers, sailing dates, 
and hours of sailing 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen*l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street. San Francisco 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO 
For Japan and China. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, atlPH, for YOKOHAMA and 
HONGKONG, calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Naga- 
saki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with Bteamera for India, etc. No cargo re- 
ceived on board on day of sailing. 
Gaelic (via Honolulu),... Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1897 

Home Tuesday, February 23, 1897 

BelgiC (via Honolulu). Saturday, March 13, 1897 
Coptic (via Honolulu)... .Thursday, April l, 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's 

Office, No. J21 Market street, corner First. 



D. D. STIJBBS, Secretary. 



Price per Cof>y. 10 Cents. 




Annual Subscription. $4.00. 



NE^ S —lis iJferER 




Vol. Li V. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 6, 1897. 



Number 6. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the proprietor, FEED JIAKlt/OTT 
&H Kearny street. San Francisco. HWmd at San Francis, o 
office at second-class Matter. 

The office of the XEHs LET 1 EH i„ ,\v., y.,rt City in at Jv,„,,u Court; 
and at Chicago. H03 Soyce BuUding. {frank E Morrison. F 
Representative), where information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 



THE rivalry between Reno and Carson, for tbe big 
prize fight, may not be altogether edifying, but it 
has all the charm of frankness. The Nevadans are not 
Saints, but on the other haud, they are not hypocrites. 

THE proposed State Board of Arbitration, for the ad- 
justment of differences between employers and em- 
ployed, would be wholly useless. It would provide sine- 
cures for a number of politicians, and that is all it is de- 
signed to accomplish. 



THE Californians of earlier days were noted for a cour- 
age that triumphed over misfortunes and disaster. 
In these times reverses often lead to suicide. Is not this 
degeneracy, so far as it goes? Blowing out one's brains 
is a fool's atonement for blowing in one's money. 

THE great amount of "space" which the Examiner is 
devoting to the coming prize fight in Nevada certain- 
ly indicates a decided interest in the "event." This inter- 
est may be of a purely sporting character, or it may be of 
a contingent or long-green sort. Readers are free to draw 
their own conclusions. 



NO better selection could be made than that of Chauncey 
Depew as Ambassador to England. He is a born 
diplomat, famous for all the qualities that adorn such a 
position, and withal a genuine American. Such a man at 
the Court of St. James is more potent than a treaty of 
arbitration to preserve the peace between the two nations. 

THOSE who defend pugilism, on the ground that it is 
"no more brutal than foot-ball," may with equal 
force and conclusiveness, justify assault and battery or 
aDy other form of violence. Physical suffering and injury 
are but incidents or risks of manly sport ; in prize-fighting 
the sole object of the combatants is to inflict disabling 
punishment. 

THE same newspapers that condemn as "atrocities" 
the burning of Cuban villages by Spanish troops, have 
no words but those of praise for the insurgents who do the 
same thing in the province of Havana. As of old, it makes 
a difference whose ox is gored. News from Cuba is col- 
ored and distorted in the daily press of this country, with 
but small exception. 

ASSEMBLYMAN Melick's libel bill should become a law. 
It provides that unless the plaintiff prove actual 
malice or want of good faith, or a failure to retract after 
a written demand, he shall recover as damages only such 
loss or injury as he shall specially allege or prove. This 
is no more than a reasonable measure of protection to 
publishers, and there can be no sound objection to it. 

S NUMBER of much needed amendments to the Wright 
irrigation law have been submitted to the Legislature. 
The principle of the original measure is a good one, in so 
■far as it enables land owners, by co-operation, to develop 
water for irrigation through organization and the issue of 
long-term bonds. But numerous abuses crept into the 
operation of the Wright Act, and these, it appears, are 
now to be remedied. 



SENATOR Withington's bill to create local monopolies 
of the retail liqoor business, under the name of tbe 
''Norwegian system, 

favor, The bUl provides that all the profits above four 
per cent, shall be devoted to "objects of public bem 
but in practice the gains would be very apt tn stick to the 
hands of the incorporators under the proposed law 

THE efficacy of oral argument has been much discussed 
of late, among lawyers and judges. The truth seems 
to be that in some cases such argument is of real value 
and in others not. There seems to be no merit in the 
proposed requirement of oral argument in all cases. The 
matter would better be left. ;is it Is now, to the discretion 
of the parties most concerned — the lawyers and the 
judges. 



A MOVEMENT is on foot in Brooklyn, New York, to 
reduce the course of study in the Girls' High School. 
Complaint is made that the curriculum overtaxes the 
strength of the pupils and impairs their health. Protests 
of this sort are occasionally heard in relation to the Girls' 
High School in this city. The tendency of American edu- 
cation is towards overstrain, and this cannot be too zeal- 
ously guarded against. 

SCIENCE and common sense unite in favor of a measure 
to bring about the extermination of dairy animals in- 
fected with tuberculosis. But there is no good reason why 
the State should compensate the owners for the destruc- 
tion of such animals. A cow diseased in this way should 
not be regarded as of any value whatever. The very best 
safeguard for the public against the spread of tuberculosis 
among dairies is that the dairymen take all the risks of 
loss. 

THE bill now before the Legislature granting street 
railway franchises on a percentage basis, met with 
opposition at the meeting of city officials and members of 
the Legislature, held last Saturday. The gentlemen 
rather favored outright sale of such privileges upon a cash 
basis. We are of opinion the percentage plan is the better 
one, inasmuch as, under fair regulations, it would yield am 
increasing return in proportion to a gain of business. In 
the East, the percentage basis of sale has operated with 
satisfactory results in municipal Government. 

MILLIONS of dollars' worth of tailings have been lost 
by California miners through ignorance of chemical 
methods of saving the gold. Professor Christy, of the 
State University, recognized as an authority in such mat- 
ters, declares that by the cyanide process tailings yielding 
no more than fifty cents per ton may be profitably worked. 
Improved chemical and other methods likewise make 
profitable the extraction and reduction of various low- 
grade ore, which, in the earlier history of the State, were 
considered to be too poor to be worth mining. 

THE Rev. Dr. Case condemns as "infamous nonsense" 
the remarks of Professor Jordan relative to "religious 
revivals," such as those in which men "lose their self-con- 
trol." For comparing this sort of emotional mania to 
alcoholic drunkenness, the reverend gentleman has called 
for the removal of "such an incompetent and dangerous 
personality from the Presidency of the Stanford Univer- 
sity." In which event we beg to nominate the Rev. Dr. 
Case for the position, he being eminently qualified by his 
piety, learning, and truly scientific spirit. A less toler- 
ant man might have suggested boiling oil as a fit punish- 
ment for the Professor, with hell fire to follow. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1897. 



THE WAY TO SUPPRESS THE EVILS OF CHINATOWN. 

THE way to do a thing is to do it. " How not to do it," 
Charles Dickens very vividly described long years ago, 
and about that time, it must have been, our local Police 
Department learnt the lesson most effectively. For more 
years than we care to recall, the suppression of the evils 
of Chiuatown has been a paramount need of this city. Yet 
during all that time those evils received police protection 
and notoriously paid for it. Regular officers were time 
and again permitted to resign, and forthwith appointed 
specials, with beats in Chinatown. We never knew one of 
those favored specials to fail to grow rich in an incredibly 
short space of time, and yet they, of course, had to divide 
with somebody. Now and then a show of activity has been 
made, but it has scarcely ever amounted to anything more 
than the sham and make-believe it was intended to be. 
Opium dens exist all over Chinatown to-day; some of them 
are visited by white girls of respectable parentage, and 
their location is perfectly well known. The police know of 
facts in this connection that are simply too terrible to 
print. The first real trouble between Little Pete and the 
rival Tongs arose over the matter of the importation of 
what are sometimes called "slave women." He could get 
his importations landed, but his rivals in business could not. 
Soon the price of a Chinawoman of that class rose to figures 
varying from sl'ihiii to 12500. It was an enormous sum for 
a Chinaman to get together, far transcending the value of 
a slave woman, whether a Creole or mulatto, in the South 
in the halcyon days of slavery. The vice of the Chinese, 
and extreme lucrativeness of the business, may be realized 
by these figures, which tell their own tale. Soon the rival 
Tongs found a new, if not a better, way to circumvent Lit- 
tle Pete. By the employment of Chinese servants in white 
families, white women posing as teachers, and the seduc- 
tive influences of money, the richer and more attractive 
class of Chinese traders and merchants found importations 
unnecessary. The facts cannot be more than hinted at. 
W. T. Stead, in the Pall Mall Gazette, shocked the civilized 
world by his plain exposure, entitled, "the maiden's trib- 
ute," yet stories can be told to-day of worse happenings 
in our own Chinatown. Little Pete, in the interests of his 
own business, tried to suppress them, and secured the 
assistance of the Chinese Consulate and of the Police De- 
partment. His assassination was principally due to that 
cause. 

It may be said, as it has been said, that the police would, 
if they could, have suppressed the seductions, opium, gam- 
bling, murders, and other crimes of Chinatown. How 
came it, then, that that system of gongs from certain 
police quarters to Chinatown was established? How 
came it that when those gongs were sounded the whole of 
Chinatown appeared to know what was meant, and hastily 
closed all criminal business before an apparently exhausted 
squad of policemen arrived? These things are no longer 
secrets. How came it that the celebrated Buckley-Toohy- 
Burns-Spots Grand Jury was called off and compelled to 
reconsider its indictments? Who was it that then said 
" they'll never put up another Grand Jury against me," 
and has ever since kept his word? What did those in- 
dictments charge, whom did they name, and why were 
squelched? How in the nature of things can it be 
compatible with police efficiency that the various Tongs 
have been in battle array scores of times; that hundreds 
of murders have been committed on the streets without 
anybody being tried, convicted or hanged? If the loss of 
their friend. Little Pete, should cause the law to be 
avenged this time, all right. But that will lead to the 
awkward inquiry as to why it has not always been simi- 
larly avenged. There is one very sure wav to deal with 
Chinatown at present. With its vendetta in full blast, de- 
fying and defeating the civil authorities, a state of war 
exists. Let martial law be proclaimed within a given 
area, and let every bighbinder'be hanged on the spot. The 
way to do a thing is to do it. Let Governor Budd take 
the hint, govern his action by the obvious failure of the 
ordinary processes of law, issue his proclamation and fol- 
low it up with the action that would then be lawful. Such 
vigorous action would result in the immediate purifii 
of that plague spot in this city. Within twenty-four hours 
Chinatown would be camped in Cow Hollow," if no better 
place could be found. 



Use the The effort now being made to cut down 
Pruning Knife, the number of teachers on the city pay 
roll is a step in the direction of sound 
economy and a practical reduction of expenditures in a 
useless direction. There is no right-thinking tax-payer in 
this city who objects to reasonable taxation for the sup- 
port of the public school system; there are none who do 
not believe that all practical necessities of the department 
be maintained, and their efficiency improved. But it is an 
undeniable fact that the control of the department has 
left the hands that should hold it, and little by little has 
found lodgment in the hands of the employees themselves 
— who very naturally are not disposed to look with meek- 
ness upon any attempt to curb their exalted ideas or cur- 
tail their impractical multiplication of departments. 

We are unable to see why strict business principles 
should not apply in the management of the public schools 
as in other municipal matters. But it is noticed that the 
protests are louder, angrier, and more persistent, when 
they come from the public instructors, than when they 
proceed from any other direction. There is resentment all 
along the line whenever school directors or other officials 
talk of needed reforms in the schools; and now a roar of 
virtuous indignation goes up because the present board 
has under consideration the dropping of certain teachers 
in departments that are of questionable utility, if indeed 
they are not utterly frivolous and fruitless. These extend- 
ing branches, which are the natural result of lax manage- 
ment, and easy-going, complaisant directors, are deserving 
of the attention of the new school board; and while it must 
ever be the wish of the intelligent that all possible advan- 
tage be afforded the children of San Francisco in their 
struggle for education, it is equally true that the original 
and proper practical scope of public instruction has been 
greatly exceeded. Let the new board pursue its proposed 
intent. The frills, the soft places, and the sinecures, of 
which there are many, should be cut off without regard to 
the outcry of the dismembered. 



Water The Courts have laid down the rule upon which 
Rates, water rates are to be fixed so plainly as to leave 
no occasion for heated discussion as to what is 
to happen in that regard. The rule has been approved by 
the Supreme Court of the State, and, in similar cases, has 
been affirmed by the Supreme Court of the United 
States. It is that water, like railroad fares and 
freights, must permit of the collection of a sufficient 
sum with which to pay for betterments, operating 
expenses, and interest on stock and bonds. In 
the case of the Spring Valley Water Company it is known 
almost to a dime how much will be required to accomplish 
those purposes. The accounts of the company for 
the past year have just been published, and its 
income permitted the payment of 6 per cent dividends 
to its stockholders. The Examiner wants the dividends 
for this year cut down to 5 per cent. Disregarding, for 
the moment, its bad motives and cinching ways, let us 
consider what merit, if any, there is in its proposition. 
Is 5 per cent the usual rate of interest in this market for 
local securities? We think not. We know of no Savings 
Banks, or other monetary institutions, that are making 
loans on gilt edged securities at less than six per cent. 
Indeed, the loaning of money for less than seven per cent 
is rather the exception than the rule. Spring Valley's 
stock is widely held in this city. It is the favorite local 
investment, because of the regularity of its dividends, and 
the confidence reposed in the company's management. 
Thousands of widows, and people of moderate means, hold 
the stock as their only source of income. It is not a stock 
that can be hurt without a great outcry and without the 
sure and certain effect of scaling down the number of 
nickels taken in by the Examiner. Besides, the Courts 
would set aside rates based on five per cent dividends. 
The new rate being declared void, resort would have to be 
had to the existing one. What good would that do any- 
body? It is proposed to reduce the city's payment for 
the water supplied to fire hydrants one half. We had 
supposed that every tyro in Municipal lore understood 
why the charge of hydrants was increased, Reduce it, 
and small consumers will have to make up the difference. 
Keep it as it is, pay it out of the City's general tax fund, 



February 6, 1897. 



SAM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



and, in that case, the big taxpayer is caught, and made 
to lessen the burden of the on 

The course of the Examiner I ..,,] ,]is. 

honest end. It opens the door and make- more. 
attainment, results that should be desired by no go 
zen. A false public opinion w , um ov 

which dishonest ofiicials would be oble to extort tribute 
from every , ..rporation doing business in San Francisco 
It would compel every corporation, as a matter of self- 
protection, to resort to the corrupt use of money in order 
to secure simple justice, and save its innocent shareh 
from disaster. It would bear no relation to the individual 
rights or burdens of the people. The parading of lengtby 
petitions proves nothing. The general public mind U so 
constituted that it will sign almost anything without hesi- 
tation; and the lists of names presented to the Supervisors 
are not entitled to more weight than the paper on which 
tbey are inscribed. Similar sheets placed about the 
streets, demanding a cut of one-half iu the price of bread, 
or boots, or overcoats, would without doubt be signed by 
every thoughtless passer-by. Those who sign the peti- 
tion of which the Examiner roars so loudly, cannot have 
knowledge of the cost of water, and are as unfamiliar with 
the immense capital employed in conducting the business 
of the Spring Valley Company, and the continued outlay 
involved in making necessary improvements, as if thev were 
inhabitants of a foreign land. The comparisons in cost of 
maintenance and operation of water works here and at 
the East, are misleading and manifestly unfair. Materials 
of all kinds are higher in San Francisco than they are in 
many Eastern cities. The single item of labor here, alone 
foots up an annual expenditure very greatly [in excess of 
the Eastern rate. An army of men are constantly em- 
ployed by the Spring Valley Company, and every man is 
paid a wage sufficient to support those dependent upon 
him in reasonable comfort. 

The laws of the State wisely provide that invested cap- 
ital employed in works of a public character shall earn a 
reasonable increment. As we have shown, and as is gen- 
erally accepted, six per cent, is a reasonable rate within 
the most conservative interpretation of law. It is far less 
than the millions of money invested in mercantile pursuits 
usually earn. The mature intent of the statutes is plain, 
and it is warranted by the financial conditions prevailing 
on this Coast. It is clearly in the interest of the whole 
people, having a fixed and just regard for the consumer 
no less than it has regard for the capital invested in neces- 
sary municipal enterprises. 

Remarkable Eestriction of undesirable immigration to 
Impertinence, this country has long been a crying neces- 
sity. The old plea of making the United 
States a refuge for all the stinking hordes of Europe has 
long since been exploded by direct friction against those 
"oppressed of all nations," the means of whose friends en- 
abled them to pay a steerage passage across the Atlantic. 
In a thousand channels the hurtful and vicious influence of 
this illiteracy, crime and degradation has forced itself 
upon the minds and into the lives of law-abiding, tax-pay- 
ing, and self-respecting men. Of all classes, only the pro- 
fessional politician — the Senators and Representatives of 
the country — have been unconscious of this great evil. 
Abject cowardice has kept them in safe oblivion of the ris- 
ing demand for legislative relief, and closed their eyes to 
the fact that the greatest peril of the country lay in the 
continued in-pour of Europe's scum. Up to a certain 
point assimilation was possible, but that period has been 
long past, as the most careless observation of the trend of 
events, both political and industrial, ominously demon- 
strate. 

Legislation protecting the products of labor has been 
one of the corner stones of the Republican party, but all 
thought of the laborer has been lost in the fear of disturb- 
ing and antagonizing the "foreign vote;" and all the 
place-buyers and office-hunters have dodged the question 
and shifted the responsibility that seemed to endanger 
their selfish and unpatriotic schemes. At last, however, 
there seems to be reasonable hope that the pickets will be 
• so firmly planted and raised so high that the object aimed 
at — the exclusion of the really undesirable and dangerous 
foreign elements — will become an accomplished fact. That 
this is true finds strong corroboration in the actions of the 



*'"! ' • nts urgent 

advising them t.. wire tl 1 

•he immigration bill, Informing 
,nt> "-' tually me., Ion, and 1 

favor of the same «iii mo.™ repudiate 

-.it at the next election.'' If any further B 

meal were required for the immediate enactment ..f such 
a law, the German Steamship agents have given it 
estion that the constituents ol Represents! 

it them at th.' next election" if thev dared |. 

a plain patriotic duty, strikes u thibitlonol 

Impertinence beyond belle}. And it develops a new and 
more <;;-. redltable reason for past Congressional apathy 

than that one of moral cowardice. Vast sums arc in\ 
in Transatlantic steamship lines, and their earnings have 
been largely made up of steerage traffic. Hitherto their 
opposition to any restrictive measure has been temp 
by the miscarriage of such legislation. The present bill, 
however, is sweeping, and will prove effective. It will 
keep out the undesirable classes and prevent the influx of 
the multitudes that now scourge the unfortunate lands of 
their nativity. This touching solicitude of the German 
Steamship agents for the welfare of the Representatives 
in Congress is a most beautiful evidence of gratitude for 
past favors: but there is little hope that it will avail 
their coffers one single penny. 

Judge Ogden's If Judge Ogden, of Alameda County, the 
Misconception, other day expressed an honest opinion, 
he proved himself too ignorant of the 
ways of this mundane sphere to be either an experienced or 
safe Judge. He refused to believe a husband, and two 
witnesses, as to acts of flirtation by the wife, on the sole 
ground that she came of respectable parentage. The hus- 
band was not appealing to the Court for any sort of 
redress; but for very naturally expostulating in private 
with his wife, she had him there as 'defendant in a suit for 
divorce, his too loving anxiety on her account being 
judicially held to be "extreme cruelty." Said the Judge: 
"Although it did not appear in evidence, it is yet a fact 
that the plaintiff comes of respectable parents; in fact, 
her father is a clergyman. Wantons do not come from 
such homes." In the first place, the Court in plaintiff's 
interest went outside the record for evidence not to be 
found within it, and that evidence he appears to have per- 
mitted to control his decision. In effect he says the hus- 
band ought to have known that a clergyman's daughter 
would only flirt innocently. Even if that were so, he still 
had a right to complain of it as unseemly in the mother of 
his children, and that appears to have been all he did. 
But how did Judge Ogden gain his knowledge as to where 
wantons do, or do not, come from? It is almost proverbial 
here, as it is in older and more staid countries, that 
clergymen's children are the worst of children, and that, 
in point of fact, they are much given to "going to the bad." 
It would be invidious to name local instances, but Judge 
Ogden's acquaintances can doubtless enlighten him on the 
point. There is, however, a case so conspicuous that 
there can be no impropriety in referring to it. The 
beautiful but notorious Lily Langtry is the daughter of 
a clergyman, and was raised not only in a good home, but 
amidst environments that all made for propriety and 
virtue. Yet the world too well knows what she became. 
The "Jersey Lily" has been in search of a divorce from 
Mr. Langtry for many years, but has never yet found a 
court iu which she dare ask for a hearing. She has had 
the misfortune all this while to overlook Judge Ogden, of 
Alameda County. 

Will Not The London Times welcomes Senator Wolcott, 
Succeed, praises his capacity and integrity, and says 
that President-elect McKinley could not have 
chosen a more acceptable envoy — all of which is very 
sweet and nice on the part of the Times, but we soon 
learn that its soft words are to butter no parsnips. It 
proceeds very delicately to regret that so distinguished a 
representative should have come upon so impossible a 
task. It says that the failure of his mission, in any other 
sense than as a political move to placate the silverites at 
home, is certain. Of course it is. We all well knew that 
in advance. The plank in the Republican platform was 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1897. 



only intended for buncombe, and the roving commission 
given to the ablest silverite of them all, was intended, 
first, as a compliment to him, and, second, as an object 
lesson to teach his silver friends that European finance is 
not to be captured by merely dropping a little salt upon 
its tail. For good, or for ill, the single standard of value 
for Europe is now fixed and immutable. All trade, com- 
merce, and values are based upon it. Silver is used for 
subsidiary purposes, and, of course, the cheaper the com- 
mercial nations can buy the white bullion the better for 
them. As we are the principal producers of that metal, 
it savors somewhat of simplicity to ask them to establish 
a corner in silver for our benefit, but to their own loss. 
The proposition was from the first a political device, trick, 
and humbug that everybody ought to have seen through. 
The rich silver mine owners were never deceived by it for 
a single instant, but many of their ignorant and deluded 
followers were, and in drawing them away it achieved its 
sole purpose. The truth is that silver must hereafter sell 
for what it is worth in the markets of the world. The 
United States Government has already passed the limits 
of safety in trying, without success, to uphold it. It is 
said that we, as a people, have not enough gold with 
which to transact our business. Very well. Let us, then, 
obtain more gold, and the way to do that, is to do as we 
did last year. We bought fewer goods abroad, sold more 
products, and, within the first ten months of the year, had 
a comfortable balance of trade in our favor, all in gold, be 
it remembered, of $266,086,709. The year upon which we 
have entered promises to do much better than that, be- 
cause the prices obtained for our products are higher. 
The way for the individual to acquire gold is to earn more 
and spend less. Precisely the same rule applies to a 
nation of individuals. 

The State Of The State of Nevada has long had an un- 
legalized enviable reputation all over the country, 
Brutality. and so far from being abashed thereby, 
it is only anxious to add to it. Known in 
politics as "the rotten pocket borough," it is about to be- 
come notorious as the State of legalized brutality. Tbat 
it should, at a time when every State in the Union had 
driven prize fighting clean out of the country, have re- 
pealed its own existing law, and, from motives of gain, 
passed another rendering prize fighting legal within its 
borders, is more than we had been prepared to believe of 
Nevada, shameless as we knew it to be. The United 
States guarantees a republican form of government to 
every State, but in the greater part of Nevada there is 
practically no government at all. It is a go-as-you-please 
arrangement all round. A man may not even live there, 
if a stronger one does not like him. Only a short time 
ago a highly respectable foreman of a mine was taken from 
the streets of Nevada's principal city, marched across the 
border, and warned never to return. His offense was 
that of being the employee of a new set of directors. The 
Governor, Sheriff, and other officialslooked on approvingly 
rather than otherwise. It has long been believed that 
anybody could be ,; put out of the way" in Nevada for 
money, and that belief is only too well sustained by proof. 
Familiarity with these things has doubtless done much to 
brutalize Nevada, to render it callous to the opinion of the 
rest of the country, and to constitute it the Hades of the 
continent. All that is decent in California regrets that 
Nevada should be so near. Better it were in Mexico, or 
better still, dropped into the depths of the ocean, along 
with Sharkey, Long Green Lawrence, and his Arizona 
friend, Umpire Earp. It was very noticeable that the 
Examiner gave the shameful measure all the aid and com- 
fort it could. The pugs are now asking for cheap fares. 
They should be given free rides upwards as high as 
Mordccais' g 

Regulating There is a bill before the Legislature that 

The Sale ought to pass. It makes the sale of poisons, 

Of Poisons, without a medical certificate, and without a 

record being kept of the same, accessible to 

all who may be interested, a misdemeanor. It also makes 

druggists responsible in pecuniary damages to husbands, 

wives, or other relatives who may .sutler loss through the 

infringement of the act. This being a general law, it will 

be applicable to the country districts where it is very 



badly needed. In San Francisco we have a local ordinance 
which measureably fills the bill, but the proposed state 
law is better. In one of the bay counties a case recently 
turned up in which a young wife was supplied by the 
village Pharmacist, who was also a Doctor, with an alarm- 
ing quantity of Chloral Hydrate, and when the inevitable 
resulted, and for days she hovered between life and death, 
he sought exorbitant fees for attending to the life he had 
for gain endangered. In the first place he had charged 
for the prescription, then for the drug, and finally for a 
very defective cure. The prescription happened to fall in- 
to the husband's hands and hence some interesting litiga- 
tion. In another instance no difficulty was found in buy- 
ing a corrosive poison to administer to a man in order to 
obtain the amount of a policy of insurance on his life. He 
luckily escaped, after suspecting the truth, and proving 
it. No doubt scores of cases, more innocent, perhaps, 
than these, yet of serious consequence, are daily occur- 
ring in some part of the State. The sale of opium, chloral, 
morphine, and kindred poisons are ruining thousands of 
families, and a law to prevent it must be passed, and its 
enforcement rendered certain, if it takes every constable 
in the State to accomplish that very desirable end. 

Railroad It is difficult to get anybody, during these 
Bankruptcies hard times, to listen to the undoubted 

In 1896. truth that the railroad fares and freights 
of the country, instead of being much too 
high, are in most instances greatly too low. There are 
far larger proportionate losses in this business than in any 
other kind of enterprise. The number of foreclosure sales 
of bankrupt railroad properties during last year was 58, 
involving 13,730 miles of road, owing in bonds and stocks 
$1,150,000,000. In the preceding year, 1895, fifty-two 
railroads, with 12,831 miles of roadbed, and a total in- 
debtedness of $761,000,000 became bankrupt. As if this 
were not enough, last year 34 additional roads with an in- 
debtedness of $275,597,000, and owniog 5,441 miles of road- 
bed, had to apply to the courts for protection against 
their creditors and go into the hands of receivers. Seventy 
per cent of the money invested in railroads by stockholders 
is earning no dividend, and nearly twenty per cent of rail- 
road bonds have gone to default. It is computed, and can 
be demonstrated, that if the railroads of this country had 
charged the same average of fares and freights as pre- 
vailed in England, their gross earnings of last year would 
have been $376,000,000 greater than they were." Common 
carrying in the United States is the cheapest in the world. 
Despite its cheapness and consequent failures, the cry of 
the day is for reduced fares and freights: — that is, for 
confiscation. The power of the courts alone saves rail- 
road property to-day from total annihilation. Bryan and 
Altgeld are for taking away that power. 

A Few of Those It is difficult to realize, until we group 
Who Stumbled, them, the long list of mortality in a 
single year among the men and women 
whose names are the property of the whole people. Try 
to recall the names of public and prominent persons, the 
accounts of whose deaths you have seen in the papers dur- 
ing the past year, and your fingers will probably suffice to 
tally them. Without attempting anything like an ex- 
haustive list, let us name a few of the most prominent 
among those of our own country alone as examples. From 
among journalists, authors, and publishers, there passed 
away in 1896 : Henry C. Bowen of the Independent. H. C. 
Bunner of Puck, Kate Field of Washington. J. W. Harper 
of the Harper publications, John A. Cockeril, Mary Abai- 
gal Dodge, Thomas W. Knox, Edgar W. Nye. and Har- 
riet Beecher Stowe. The list of public men 'includes such 
names as Benjamin H. Bristow. Charles F. CrisD, John R. 
Fellows, Governor F. T. Greenhalge, and William E. Rus- 
scl. The theatrical profession mourns the loss of Henry 
E. Abbej', Italo Campanini, James Lewis, Frank Mayo, 
J, H. McVicker, and Alexander Salvini, while among mil- 
lionaires and famous business men were numbered Austin 
Corbin, Hamilton Disston, John H. Inman, and Enoch 
Pratt. Here are twenty-four names familiar to the whole, 
country. Could you have named ten of them from memory? 
Yet the whole list would comprise a hundred and fifty 
names, and, strangely enough, not a San Franciscan among 
them. 



Februaiy 6, 1897. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



AT TME CAPITOL. 

Sa< It vv ■■nury 4. 18 

CHIEF Clerk Duckworth has been the star performer 
of the Legislature this week; and by hi> testimony 

charitably assumes the most of the sins otitis confr 

the stuffed payroll crime. Assemblyman Emmons turned 

the search-light on the witness, who." under his qui 
made admissions that would have been damaging to any 
less flagrant violation of integrity than is an admitted 
fact. While Duckworth made many of the appoint- 
ments under violent pressure, he DO doubt was prodigal ol 
promises in order to ensure his own election. From the 
present indications, I believe that the investigation will 
will end in a reprimand. But a scorching minority report 
may be expected, fathered by Emmons, who, by the way, 
is an honest and intelligent legislator. 

The attempt to take a half-million from the Treasury, 
and divide it between retaining dams for the miners and 
a State dredger for reclamation of overflowed lands, 
called Speaker Coombs from the chair to denounce the 
measure and inform the legislators that a record-making 
crisis confronted them. A combination has been effected 
between the localities and constituencies most interested, 
and the measure passed the House with a whoop, despite 
the earnest and angry protests of a very decided minority. 
Its fate in the Senate is more a matter of doubt, and the 
taxpayers may be saved in the Upper House and on the 
Governor's desk. 

Los Angeles street contractors are here, interested in a 
bill which, if it should pass, would work a great hardship 
on the owners of property contiguous to the streets on 
which the improvements have been made. At present 
payment for street work may be made by bond running 
ten years. The new "cinch" bill permits foreclosure and 
transfer of title to the property securing the bonds, unless 
paid upon one year's uotice. Some -of the contractors in- 
terested in this bill hold as high as a quarter million in 
these improvement bonds. 

At pretty nearly every session of the Legislature, tribute 
has been levied among other corporations and firms, on 
the foreign marine insurance companies by means of 
"cinch" bills. Without ascribing any improper motive to 
Senator Bert, who is the father of Senate Bill No. 11, the 
measure, I feel, would be an unjust and unnecessary law 
if passed, and the fact remains that this bill is one of the bi- 
ennial "cinch" bills, and should be beaten. Its object is to 
prevent any foreign insurance company from doing busi- 
ness in this State unless there is on deposit in some State 
in the United States securities to the amount of $200,000. 
Inasmuch as marine insurance companies are the particu- 
lar insurance companies the bill aims at, and as there 
is really no good reason why they should be asked to have 
securities on deposit as is proposed, there is, on the other 
hand, several reasons why the law is ill-advised and un- 
necessary. Insurance Commissioner Higgins incorporates 
in his late report to the Governor some of the arguments 
used by those who favor the measure. Some statements 
are wholly incorrect, while others are misleading. In one 
place he says "the companies foreign to the United States 
do not pay taxes," and that only a fee of $20 for filing 
their annual statement is received from them. As a mat- 
ter of fact, not only the $20 fee, but taxes in several forms 
are paid by such companies. Every quarter taxes on the 
amount of premiums recorded is collected. When over 
$10,000, the tax is $50; when under that amount, $25. 
Then there is an annual tax on the money in bank of 
each company, and a franchise tax on an estimated 
valuation of the company's franchise, which is never 
set at less than $2,000. Besides, these companies 
employ clerks, pay office rent and add in other ways 
to the prosperity of the State. If the people were 
to be benefited, of course no objection could be made, to the 
bill, but it seems to me that by destroying competition 
certain companies could boldly raise their rates to suit 
themselves, much to the disadvantage of those the law 
pretends to benefit. Another argument of the. Insurance 
Commissioner, so far as marine companies are concerned, 
which falls to the ground, is that a law requiring deposits 
would prevent forced settlements with the insured, insinu- 
ating that such a procedure was a common one. As a 



nr, Informed by rolinble marine insur- 

orded a ... 
sign marine company evaded payment of a loss or f 

by threat) naive litigation in a 

foreign country. The deposit feature, however, would not 

be utterly objectionable Ira reasonable amount •■■ 

'ay 150, Even that is really too large, but a 

(200,000 deposit would drive pretty nearly every foreign 
marine company out of business in California. 

The new Hoard of siate Library Trustees, bo il is re- 
ported, will elect W. w. Seaman. 'of Los Angeles, to 

reed Dr. Matthews, who is the present State Librarian 

and Mixologist, with private bar in Librarian's 1 

Pig, 

A Sovereign Remedy. 
DR. PARKER'S COUGH CURE. Our <!..„.■ will stop a cough. It neror 
tails. Try It. Price 2So. George DahlbpudtT & Co., 214 Kearny street. 

The Rio Grande Western Railway anrt connections are offering 
low rates and superior accommodations to all points East. Before 
purchasing tickets, call nt 1 1 Montgomery street. 

W. H. Sm:i.aki:u, General Agent. 



No lamp is a good one 
without its particular chimney. 

The Index tells what Num- 
ber to get ; sent free. 

" Pearl top " or " pearl 
glass." 

Geo A Macbeth Co 

Pittsburgh Pa 

G~l..«k!^ TL^^l The "Gem" Theatre of tfc 
OlUmbta I neatre- Friedlander,Gottlob&Co., 
and Managers. 
And now comes the greatest of them all, CHARLES HOPPER in 

GMIMMIE FADDEN. 

Direction of Frank McKee; the one distinct novelty of the year; 
five months in New York; one month in Chicago; one month in 
Boston; one month in Philadelphia; original company, scenery 
and effects. For two weeks only, commencing Monday, Febru- 
ary 8th. Attraction to follow, FANNY RICE. 

B-,1 J../:» TL^^-J-.^ AL - Hayman & Co., (Incorporated) 
aldvVin I neatre- proprietors. 

Two weeks, beginning Monday, February Sth. The eminent 
actor, Mr. 

LOUIS dAMES, 

Supported by Guy Lindsley, Alma Kruger, and a superior com- 
pany, in magnificent scenic productions of Mr. James' greatest 
successes 

EDtire first week: SPARTAGUS, 

Second week: "My Lord and Some Ladies," "Hamlet," 
'•Othello," etc. 



California Theatre. 



The Musical Event of the season. 

Messrs Friedlander. Cottlob & Co. take pleasure in announ- 
cing tue first appearance here of 

M'LLE TREBELLI, 

The famous prima-donna soprano, on TUESDAY evening, Feb- 
ruary 0th, at 8:15 p. m. assisted by Gustav Hinrich's Symphony 

Orchestra. Seats now on sale. 
Prices, 50c, $1, $1 50 



Tivoli Opera 

Every evening 



Mrs. Ernestine Krbling, 

Proprietor and Manager 



Mouse 

at y; our up-to-date extravaganza, 



ALADDIN, 

Or, The Wonderful Lamp. 

The latest sensation. '"La Danse des Flours Eleotriques;" the 
Floating Palace in Mid-Air; the Six Little Tailors: the superb 
Ballet of Cleopatras ; the new and novel Specialties. 
Popular Prices 25cand50o 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 

rpneUm. street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 
Week commencing Monday, February 8th. 

ARA, ZEBRA X l/ORA, 

Europe's premier equilibrists; Jobn and Bertha Gleason, Nov- 
elty Dancing Duo; Guille. ihe world's greatest tenor; Ward & 
Curran. the clipper comedians; last week of Bessie Clayton, the 
Franz Family, and the beautiful ballets . The Royal Hungarian 
Orchestra every eveningintheannex. Reserved seats, 35c ; bal- 
cony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50c. Matinees Wednesday, 
Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices: Parquet, any seat, 
35c; balcony, anyseat, 10c.; children, 10c., any part. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1897. 





We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THINK that somewhere 'in the dark 
backward and abysm of time,'' 
(as Mr. Bierce so fondly and so fre- 
quently quotes) a coarse ancestor of mine 
must have stormed and bellowed from 
his seat in the pit his robust rapture 
for the large uncompromising play acting of Mrs. 
Siddons. Something in me wakes and stirs to Macbeth. 
I have long and urgently deplored what I have 
called by no less title, if you please, than The Art of Ob- 
vious Playacting. I never quite wanted to reduce life or 
drama to* the pianissimo of Mr. Howells's, who writes with 
a chaperon, but I cherished a superior disdain of plays 
and players of the stage stagey. Now I find it possible to 
take my meed of tragedy iu the proper Siddons spirit. At 
least Macbeth rouses me thoroughly, takes me by the blood 
and vertebne and shakes me into strange excitement. 

Macbeth, with all its symbols and psychology is first, last 
and all the time drama of action and incident and valorous 
and bloodthirsty phrases — in a word, melodrama. History 
does not chronicle the actor who has played a quiet 
Macbeth . even ultra-modernity does not ask for one ; and 
the pink dawn of Romance, with its attendant swords, 
daggers and feats of arms and feats of lungs may even 
bring about a renaissance of the long lost "heavy legiti- 
mate. " And the heavy legitimate demands heavy play- 
acting to-day, just as it did in the palmy and pre-palmy 
days of old. Only there must be one innovation : Shakes- 
peare must be well dressed. The days of the shabby- 
genteel legitimate are over. Henry Irving, Augustin 
Daly and Richard Wagner — yes, Wagner and Beyreuth 
and the Metropolitan Opera House — have spoiled the 
public for masterpieces in rags. The sleek, prosperous 
present will accept contemporary romance in hand-me- 
downs, but it wants all velvet, and a yard wide, for the 
masterpieces. This is the reason why Irving and Daly 
are the only managers who can gracefully pull through a 
New York season with the "classics." This is why 
Margaret Mather's Cymbelim has to be advertised as a 
" $25,000 production ;" and the absence of it is why Louis 
James Is booked, "the only tragedian on the road this 
season " — for even the provinces have become fastidious. 
It is of course true that the legitimate died, not for want 
of good clothes and brilliant lights and millionaire scenery, 
but for want of playactors, real playactors, not enemic 
imitation play actors. But the age is luxurious ; virtu- 
osity is out of vogue. It takes more than one star to make 
a first night, and two's not a company. And so I take it 
that in the face of fads and cheap plays and cheap acting 
San Francisco has done handsomely by Modjeska and 
Haworth, and the slap-gathered little band of players who 
support them. 

Speaking of playacting, it is well for us to realize that 
in all America the brightest representative of this almost 
lost art is Joseph Haworth. And this simple statement 
of truth is not half the compliment Haworth merits, be- 
cause practically he has no competitors. Mansfield is a 
freak, young Salvini is dead, Warde is worse than dead, 
and James, though an actor of conspicuous talent, lacks 
the vital element of distinction. So Haworth is more than 
the peer of these. In fact, it looks very much as though 
he and Nat Goodwin were to divide the more dignified re- 
sponsibility of the American stage for the next decade. 

Haworth's Macbeth, being a creature of broad vocal 
depths and clean, impressive reading and irreproachably 
developed crescendo, is not a new Macbeth, beyond the 
rich color quality Haworth gives him out of his own per- 
sonality. As I said before, a new Macbeth would have to 
be a soft one, and Shakespeare has left enough soft 
spots in him as it is without requiring the misreading of 
any sensation-seeking actor. Considering William Shake- 
speare's occasional tendency to smother meaning in 
sweet phrases for the music-loving ear, and the length of 
Macbeth's part, it is conspicuously well defined. Of course, 



no sane person, removed from the evil prejudices of the 
schoolroom, can follow Macbeth through the splendid blend 
of despair and fury voiced in 

I will not yield 

To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet. 

And to be baited with the rabble's curse! 

Though Dirnam wood be come to Dunsinane, 

And thou opposed, being of no woman born, 

Yet will I try tbe last— 
and then see him started to the fray on this puny, Mother 
Goose couplet, 

Lay on. Macduff; 
And damned be he who first cries "Hold; enoueh!" 

without wishing William had enjoyed the privilege of such 
an editor, say, as Miss Gilder of The Critic. One might 
as well split gloves over the rhetorical juiciness of 
A horse ! A horse! My kingdom for a horse! 
when some horny-lunged Thespian exalts it to the pivot of 
a scene. 

However it is not my aim to be "lassed among those am- 
biguous gentlemen, Shakespearian scholars. I do not want 
to bicker about the temperature of the green calcium in 
the dagger scene, or how many little whiskers the first 
witch should wear on her chin. When you go after the 
Bard with a search light and a grappling iron and a 
Bocaccio and a Holinsbed, you lose sight of his transcen- 
dent scheme — he wrote for the playhouse and endeavored to 
be entertaining. Haworth seems to take very much the 
same view. He does not strive for any deep mysticism 
that is not on the surface of the text. He concedes Macbeth 
a covetous rascal in his first attack of the witches ; he gives 
him a broad brutality of his own, which, contrasted with 
the fragility of Modjeska's Lady Macbeth, keeps him 
rather prominently aloof from the hen-pecked key. This 
is the only charge of radicalism that can be laid against 
bim. His development of the character is unswerving and 
masterful; the ambition, the touch of humanness, the fear, 
the fatalism, the deed which is gilded with ambition, then 
crime gilded by more crime and attended by their ven- 
geances of superstition and hallucination ; the man sub- 
merged, the brute upheld until, in the climax of the combat 
with Macduff, he fights and dies with the snarl and — so 
almost is the illusion — the very being of an animal. And 
this is play acting ? obvious, too ? May I never again grow 
too young to enjoy it. 

* # * 

Modjeska plays Lady Macbeth very much as Patti 
might sing Briinhilde. And in a cast made up of vociferous 
traditionallists — who made a Scottish holiday of the rare 
opportunity to tear passion to tatters and still not exceed 
the bounds of art — her repressed intensity, and candid 
femininity could not be otherwise than at a disadvantage. 
Modjeska's reading is beautifully lucid and sincere, and in 
the sleep-walking scene she is stirringly convincing, 
but Nature never builded for an actress to embody such a 
Mary Stuart as Modjeska's, and yet attain to the heroic 
severity of Lady Macbeth. 

The disaster which befell Mr. Lonergan, and cast some- 
thing of a gloom over the Macbeth-Macduff fight in the 
last act, is not without the solace of humor: Mr. Loner- 
gan's voice forsook him, and he was compelled to fight in 
a hoarse whisper. Prior to this misadventure, Mr. Lon- 
ergan's work was earnest and telling. Mr. Osbourne 
played the drunken porter with such rare unctuousness 
(unctuousness is a word much abused by dramatic critics: 
it really serves at its best when describing the utter 
greasiness of a classic jag) as to almost redeem that ill- 
timed bit of "comic relief" with which William Shakespeare 
destroyed the suspense of one of the best moments in his 
play. The excellence of Landers Stevens's performance 
dumbfounded me. There were address, and resolution, 
and manly music, and a picture in his Malcolm. 
* # * 

Mary Stuart and Modjeska are names inseparably cher- 
ished in the hearts of this generation of play-goers. There 
is no other actress who can give to this old-fashioned 
picture play the fragrance, the spirituality, the complete 
reality that Modjeska does. In it she finds the epitome of 
her temperament. And it seemed more than a coincidence 
on Saturday night, when Modjeska played this part, as 
we of San Francisco have never seen even her play it be- 



February 6, 1897. 



SAN Francisco NEWS l.r: 



fore, that Haworth should have given us a Mortimer 
equally unforgettable. And think what there is to Morti- 
mer's part!— one bit, the death scene. Yot the eloq 
the heart-touch, the magnetic thrill of that moment, were 
as near the perfection of human art as we arc ever like to 
find it. It was not a night for sympathy with Ill-advised 
Mrs. Edgerton. who took this occasion to forsake the 
respectable business of a drawing-room reciter for the 
fiercer glitter of real footlights, Mrs. Edgerton has a 
bumptious conception of Queen Elizabeth which is certainly 
novel, but far from plausible. 1 think she mistakes the 
bastard queen for a female Palstaff. 

# * # 

The Tivoli has always been neglected in the matter of 
fair criticism, the policy of the papers being something 
like this : " If it is a good show, puff it ; if it is Dot so 
good, puff it anyway — there is always the money's worth 
at the Tivoli." Waiving all loftier considerations, this has 
been somewhat unjust to the management, inasmuch as 
the critics hare not always considered it necessary to visit 
the Tivoli prior to the puff. I have often claimed that the 
only unprejudiced theatrical reviews were those written 
by persons who never have seen the performance under 
discussion or formed any opinions whatever on the relative 
excellence of amusements — because your true critic beiDg 
by instinct and cultivation a man of taste, and hence ac- 
quiring a delicate appetite for what is good and artistic, 
and a vigorous distaste for what is neither of these, is, of 
course, unfitted for impartial consideration of the average 
performance in the average playhouse. In extenuation of 
myself, Aladdin, at the Tivoli, is not an average perform- 
ance, not merely a good show for a cheap price. It is a 
smashing spectacular production and ten times better in 
every partibular than either Jack and the Beanstalk or 
Babes in the Wood. It has that which both of those pieces 
lacked — a certain measure of unity. In Aladdin there are 
fun, color, glitter, pageantry, ballet, songs, specialty and 
specialty,all in the happiest balance. Ferris Hartman does 
not have the entire performance on his shoulders, and con- 
sequently both Mr. Hartman and the performance appear 
to much better advantage. In fact I have never seen 
Hartman so genuinely comical as he is this week. There 
is also a satisfying surety in all the electrical and mechan- 
ical devices, and the flower dance on the darkened stage 
danced by five girls studded with twinkling incandescents, 
is an Edisonian dream. The six little tailors headed by 
little Jack Robertson (a clever little lad in every particu- 
lar except that of singing through his little nose) are 
already the talk of all the children and grandparents in 
town. Miss Seabrook seems of a sudden to have lost her 
aggressive Delia Foxisms and her Aladdin is proportion- 
ately that much better than it would have been two weeks 
ago. All the Tivoli people are in the production, not for- 
getting those wonderful chorus girls to whom the Tivoli is 
largely indebted for every success. All in all, Aladdin 
to my mind is the best extravaganza ever staged at the 

Tivoli. 

* * * 

They call it The Prodigal Father at the Columbia, but it 
isn't. Father has not come home yet; he's still out prodi- 
galling, and several first-class vaudeville people, and sev- 
eral who are not so first-class are keeping the stage warm 
for him. If you really must have the comedy, The Prodigal 
Father, it is in a footnote on the programme. I did not 
need it myself; there were too many good variety acts 
bouncing about the stage. May Irwin's new song — the 
successor to "The New Bully"— "Oh, Mr. Johnson!"— is 
sung in the first act. It is the most fraternal thing I've 
heard in years — you can't lose it. Titenia's tittivating 
toes, Rose Melville's "jay girl from Slab Hollow," and "Oh, 
Mr. Johnson!" are to the limit of spiciness. And spice is 

the life of variety. 

* # * 

After the little Titian tenor, G-uille, had opened wide his 
silver throat, and sung the rafters out of the Orpheum, 
and sung them back again, and the audience still clamored 
for more, something happened which caused Phil Hastings 
to swoon outright in his great-coat. Guille bounded down 
to the lights, handed Rosner a piano score, and com- 
menced to sing "I dread the day you'll forget me, Mar- 
gue-rite." I waited, breathless, my eyes rivited on the 



gallery. Guille ended with a skyward BourUh 
.'. btch mM 

zon me. I 111 wl minute." And iii the 

gallery not red. for the gallery smiled. 

Tl.is w;is las) Sunday night. 

■ # 1 

The now , mphony concert! opened rather un- 

propitiously Thursday afternoon at the Columbia. It 
rained menageries without, and a defective furnace smoked 
hard enough to have cured hams within. Mr. Ilinrichs 
and his musicians claim neither the valor nor the lungs of 
accomplished Bremen, so to have played as well as they 
did while choking with smoke and smell (Mr. Greenbaum 
did not have time to perfume the lire) is doubly to their 
1. Dvorak's I) major symphony and Tschaikowsky's 
"Marche Slave were the novelties. The symphony is 
wantonly melodious, and the oivhest ration burns and zips 

in the Bohemian composer's characteristic spirit. Amer- 
ican music has a very nice step-papa in Dr. Dvorak. 1 
March teems with rhythm and color, and the interblend- 
ing of the Russian Hymn is handled with fine craft ; in fact, 
the entire work is one of strong character and masterly 
instrumentation. Mrs. Hinrichs' singing of the air from 
The Queen 0/ Sheba was disappointing. Her contralto is 
tremulous and not always true, and her method of singing 
is labored and unmusieianly. Asiiton Stevens. 



Chimmie Fadden, with the original company, comes to 
the Columbia next Monday for two weeks, with Charles 
Hopper in the title-role. The company is strong, and the 
dramatization of the play is said to be of even greater in- 
terest than the original story. 

Louis James, a sterling actor, opens a two weeks' sea- 
son at the Baldwin Monday night, in a revival of Dr. Bird's 
heroic play, Spartacus. Old theatre-goers will remember 
Forrest and McCullough in the gladiatorial role, which now 
is said to fit Mr. James better than anything he has ever 
played before. Alma Kruger and Guy Lindsley are of the 
company. 

Next week at the Orpheum Guille will sing Gounod's 
"Ave Maria," with violin obligato by Miss Nina de St. 
Herbert, a young San Franciscienne. Ara, Zebra and 
Vora, European equilibrists, and John and Bertha Glea- 
son, dancers, are the other new features. 

M'lle. Trebelli, prima donna soprano, (a daughter of the 
famous contralto by that name), assisted by Hinrichs' 
Symphony Orchestra, will give a concert at the California 
on Tuesday night, which promises to be one of the biggest 
musical events of the season. Trebelli will sing, among 
other numbers, the cavatina from Semiramide, the Salome 
air from Massenet's Her6dia.de, and Solverg's Song, which 
Grieg composed for Ibsen's Peer Oynt. Schubert, Hum- 
perdink, Saint-Saens, and Delibes will be represented in 
the orchestral selections. 

Aladdin has made a big hit at the Tivoli, and will con- 
tinue indefinitely. 



St. Denis 



Broadway & 1 1th St., 
NEW YORK. 

Opposite Grace Church 
EUROPEAN PLAN, 

Rooms $1.50 per day and Upwards. 

In a modest and unobtrusive way there are few 
better conducted hotels In the metropolis than the 
St. Denis. 

The great popularity it has acquired can readily 
be traced to its unique location, its home-like at- 
mosphere, the peculiar excellence of its cuisine and 
service, and its very moderate prices. 

WILLlAfl TAYLOR & SON. 

Pacific Goast (Jockey Glub, 

(Ingleside Track). The only perfect winter race track in 
America. Racing from January 25th to February 6th, inclusive. 

FIVE OR MORE RAGES DAILY, 

rain or shine. First race at 2 p m. 

Take Southern Pacific trains at Third and Townsend streets 
depot, leaving at 1 and 1 :%Q o'clock p. M. Fare for round trip, in- 
cluding admission to grounds. $1. Take Mission street eleotric 
line direct to track. The Tarpey Stakes Saturday, January 30. 
The Hobart Stakes Saturday, February 6. 
A. B. Spbeckels, President. W. S. L-eakjg, Secretary. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1897. 



CHIEF Dennis Sullivan of the Fire Department is a 
practical joker past reformation, and his best efforts 
in the indulgence of this pastime are reserved for his most 
intimate friends. His great crony is Johnny Murphy, 
proprietor of the St. George Stables, and not long ago 
the pair went on a little trip into the country. The chief 
started homewards in the evening, but Murphy, who had 
met some convivial spirits remained behind, lingered long 
over a bowl of wassail and concluded to retain his com- 
fortable quarters for the night. Before his departure, 
Sullivan told the landlord of the village inn that his friend, 
Johnny Murphy, suffered from occasional catalepsy and 
had to be waked up every hour. 

"He may kick a little when you rouse him," said 
Sullivan, "but don't you pay any attention to that. You 
wake him up every sixt}' minutes, sure now, or he 
will die." 

Much impressed by this warning, the landlord followed 
the Chief's instructions to the letter. In vain Murphy 
roared in indignation, groaned about his head and begged 
to be allowed to sleep in peace. To be sure that he was 
awake, the landlord, aided by the barkeeper and the 
Chinese cook, made him get out of bed and run around the 
room after each hourly "treatment." The Murphy rage 
was impotent and he was forced to submit. 

When Johnny came home he did not say much but he 
waited patiently for a chance to even up his score. He 
planned a blow at the Chief's dignity the other day by 
delivering a bogus message. 

"Eddie Graney left word for you here," said Mu 
"that he wanted you to superintend the whitewashing of 
his place." 

Parenthetically it may be observed that when Graney is 
not "doing politics," he conducts a large blacksmith shop 
in St. George's Alley, in convenient proximity to Murphy's 
stable and the Fire Engine headquarters. 

The Chief was secretly affronted by the message which 
he believed was and supposed was intended by 

Graney to depreciate his importance in the eyes of the 
members of the Fire Department. 

"All right. I'll boss his job" quickly responded Sullivan 
no little acrimony mingled with his alacrity, while Johnny 
Murphy satisfied with the movement, of the wheels he had 
in motion, turned away in gladness. 

When Graney returned to his establishment late that 
afternoon he was tilled with consuming wrath. The white- 
washing had not been confined to the interior of the shop, 
but the entire front of the place had been covered with the 
cheap mixture, obliterating the expensive paint placed 
Worst of all 1 lis immense horse 
of wrought iron, Graney's especial pride, had been 
two coats of whitewash. 

"What bally idiot did this'.'" shouted Graney in a tine 

frenzy. He used much additional language that was 

superfluous and unnecessary to this narrative. 

hap the; 1 one of the 

white 1 eted it all. Ani 1 aney, 

ere was so much extra work done, the job will cost 

you live dollars more than the price I told you." 

And then Graney's language was positively shockil 
* # • 

Some little amusement has been caused by Fremont 
Older's expedition to Canton, undertaken because the 
Major sent for him." Behind the visit to the President- 
in behalf of Judge Waymire's Cabinet aspirations is 
a little storj of how Older fooled his dearest friends re- 
garding his movements. At the time of the Senatorial 
election, the editor went to Sacramento as the adviser of 
the A in. whom he suddenly precipi- 

iinst Perkins, in eon- 
which fmi.r pas Waymire failed to secure endorsement for 
the Cabinet by the Republican legislative caucus. After 
it was all over, Older came home and went to bed with 
nervous prostration. He was invisible to his most inti- 



mate friends, and did not even hold communication with the 
editorial rooms of his paper. As days went by and Older 
failed to reappear, his associates grew anxious, but all 
inquiries regarding Fremont's health were answered with 
the indefinite gravity of a serious illness. After two weeks, 
Older's office companions became genuinely alarmed over 
his condition, and the gravest results of nervous prostra- 
tion were suggested. Just when apprehension was at its 
height, a dispatch from Chicago was printed in a morning 
paper to the effect that Older was <« routi to Canton to 
plead Waymire's cause. Then the nature of his mysteri- 
ous malady was apparent. It is said that if Waymire 
should be appointed to the Cabinet, Older would be the 
Chief Clerk of bis department — a contingency which will 
hardly cause him to leave his present position. The Presi- 
dent-elect is said to have suggested to Older that "per- 
haps Judge Waymire is needed in the California Legisla- 
ture," so the Alameda statesman may never be trans- 
ferred to the whirl of Washington political life. 



No doubt many people are haunted by the fear that they 
may be buried alive, and this mortal terror is kept active 
by periodical stories of uncovered graves and the discovery 
of the terrible truth that those who had been placed in 
them bad awakened only to find themselves four feet under 
ground and no telephone handy. A striking illustration 
of this fear occurred recently in this city. A wealthy man, 
feeling the approach of the grisly monster, and feariug 
that it might only he a bluff, determined not to be caught 
napping. He gave rigid instructions that the utmost 
precautions should be employed to determine if he had 
really departed to the pale realm of shade before his body 
should be committed to mother earth. He ordered that 
his executor, under pain of his immediate displeasure, 
should stay his body for three days in a vault, and sur- 
round it by perpetual watchers, who should note the least 
1 ! 1 i arance of returning life. . After this prolonged vigil, 
a physician should appear, and with the tools of his trade, 
gently but firmly disturb the repose of the remains by a 
scientific examination to the very seat of existence — the 
heart. If the result disclosed the final fact of death, the 
obsequies might proceed. He wanted to take no chances. 
Death finally came, and after the usual ceremonies the re- 
mains were transferred to a vault and the watch set about 
"idy for three days. Evidently life had fled; further 
assurance of that fact was not needed. But the executor 
determined to meet the orders of the deceased, and called 
Dr. H. Isaac Jones to make the final test. The doctor 
made the examination as required, although he knew it to 
be useless, and was told thereafter that embalming fluid 
had been freely used before the body was placed in the 
l aull . Inasmuch as the smallest quantity of this preserver 
of the dead would prove immediately fatal to a healthy 
j ki ile was really superfluous. The 
a On did nol think to ask whether the injection had 
made at the previous instance of the deceased, as 
additio ity against his premature interment; but 

he is prepared to believe it was. 

There is no doubt, however, that deceased was dead. 



Some time ago, Grace Church organized, under the 
direction of W. H. Holt, an able organist from England, 
an adult male choir. was undertaken 

as an experiment, it lias been most successful from its in- 
ception, the church evening praise services having been 
largely attended. On Sunday evening, the nineteenth 
festival service will be held, and an especially prepared 
programme, which here follows, will be given : 

Motet— 88th Psalm, (Ernest Ford) Full Choir 

Tenor Solo— Babylon," Watson). Frank Coffin 

Anthem—" The Radiant Morn," (Woodward) Full Choir 

Barytone Solo— " Israfel," (Oliver King) 8. Homer Henley 

Tenor Solo and Chorus—" From out the Kadiaut Mom." 

Frank Collin and Choir, 
offertory — Organ Solo "Allegretto." (Wely). 

The following gentlemen constitute the choir : Tenors, 
Frank Coffin, J. M. Shawhan, P. L. Bowe, J. E. Jones, 
G. H. J. Bremner, Charles Heuning; Basses, S. Homer 
Henlev, W. McDonald, George Batch, George H. Hooke, 
N. B.'Frisbie, S. E. Tucker, C. E. Holt. 



February 6, 1897. 



SAN* FRANCISCO NKWS I.KTTKR. 



Down in the Board Room of the Stock Exchange they 
are having no little diversion over the mutual jubila- 
tions of w! B. Miles and J. M. Forbes, each broker 
satisfied that he "did the other up," while the other mom 
bers agree that honors are aboK! even. Forbea la a big 
man, and for years he has patienth 'cultivated a beard, until 
it matched his other gigantic proportions. Those Bowing 
whiskers were the thief joy and pride of his life. Hi 
ished his affection on the capillary appendage to his chin, 
which made him look like a Popufist of the middle-of-the- 
road breed. The other stock-brokers chaffed Forbes un- 
mercifully about his whiskers, but Forbes loyally stuck to 
them. 

One day this week, Miles offered for sale three hundred 
shares of Yellow Jacket stock. 

" J will give you thirty-four for the lot,'' said Forbes. 

" You can have it for thirty-one. if you will go down- 
stairs to the barbershop and shave those whiskers," re- 
plied Miles, tauntingly. 

To his surprise and grief, Forbes promptly took him up. 
In twenty minutes the beard lived only in history. It was 
a thing of the past. Forbes then claimed the Yellow 
Jacket stock at three points lower than his own bid, and 
Miles reluctantly relinquished it. It was now Forbes' 
turn to guy Miles; but the tables were again turned, for 
on the following day Yellow Jacket was quoted at twenty- 
nine, and Forbes admitted, with chagrin, that he had paid 
two points higher than the current quotation of the stock. 
.Miles thinks the laugh is all his way now, for he bought 
back all the stock he wanted at twenty-nine. But Forbes 
mourns his lost whiskers and refuses to be comforted, be- 
cause they are not. 

* * # 

Mr. Harrison, the Sausalito Coal King, is once more on 
Change. He went to Washington six weeks ago to inter- 
view Mr. McKinley anent the opening of the Coast road 
through the Government reservation to Point Lobos. 
"William," said Mr. McKinley, as reported by Mr. Harri- 
son, "you may have my head for a football if that road 
don't go through. I know how Billy Berg, the German 
traveller, Tom Watson, Frank Cartan, and all the boys 
want that road, and they are going to have it. Give my 
regards to Commodore Harrison, and tell him we keep in- 
formed here about the way he is running those water 
works, and that if he does not come down a bit, I will have 
to send a special commission to Marin County to regulate 
affairs." 

Mr. Harrison thus merrily discourses of the great men 
he has met on his travels. The California newspaper boys 
Willie took with him are homesick. Arthur McEwen 
says he would rather be hammering away at the orthodox 
creeds in this glorious climate on a cracker a week, than 
living in New York on terrapin and champagne; Bob 
Davis has run out of his Western lies, and Charley Michel- 
son cries himself to sleep every night from pure nostalgia. 

* * # 

While the rain was coming down in torrents, and the 
wind blowing a gale which made the anemometer whirl at 
the rate of fifty miles an hour, a portly Montgomery street 
real estate agent stood in the doorway of his offiee_ talking 
to a friend possessing fewer years and less avoirdupois 
and discretion. 

"Just look at that woman crossing the street," said the 
younger man. "Beef to the heels, like a Mullingar heifer I 
Great Scott! White stockings, too! Doesn't she look 
like a tad? Wouldn't that jar you?" 

"It undoubtedly would jar me, but for one fact," said 
the real estate man, sweetly. "You see," he added, 

"she's my wife." 

* * * 

Donald deV. Graham took a large quantity of sketching 
material with him to the Islands. That is the place for 
models. Mr. Graham can catch the "altogether" in the 
water, where they disport like mermaids, or on the banks 
of the Nuuanu river, where they pose like Diana, fresh 
from her bath. They are by no means immodest, because 
too familiar with nudity to perceive anything objection- 
able in it, and they only entertain a dim idea of what 
virtue which their white sisters speak about actually 
means. They are daughters of Nature, those Hawaiian 
damsels, and obey all her promptings without any self-con- 
sciousness of evil. 



Harry I. ndent of 1 n for the 

Mark' 

nation on d 

- of the horse as t curiici I 

n New 5Tork, He attended a meeting at which tin- 
street spa< livery WB 
There arc ;ilh>i.i 6800 wagODS Of this 1 

and these horses, with atal occupy almost aquar 

■ the strict space, of that city. Therefore, the 

municipality has decided that the horse must go and the 
Wagons be propelled by compressed air. Mr. Lynch rode 
on a coach driven by compressed air, which had a speed 
capacity of thirty-five miles an hour, ami its arrangement 

-" simple that a child might be entrusted with the lever. 
ill see .some of them on this side pretty shortly. 
• • # 
The epicures of the clubs declare that the genuine New 
York sheep head has found its way to our waters, and is 
in the market today. Major Ned Palmer and Warren 
Payne, members of the Pots and Pans Society, have made 
affidavit that they ate a genuine sheep head on Friday, 
and that it was sweet as butter. Captain House, by the 
invention of his soluble Welch rarebit, has caused a run on 
the chafing dish stores, and never before was the gum 
tickling little animal so popular. Some of the haughty 
swells of the clubs mix it with champagne, and declare that 
the foaming wine and the rarebit were made for one an- 
other, while the more conservative old boys stick to ale 
and porter. The House rarebit requires neither, and may 
be eaten cold, which is a revelation in this line of natural 
history. 

Strictly up-to-date and handsomest line of gent's furnishing 
goods at John W. Carmany's, 25 Kearny street. 

The best of all Pills are Beecham's. 



Of vitality and energy, a good appetite, and per- 
fect health are obtained and endure by taking 



Peruvian 

Bitters. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1897. 




lt M 



A Book 
of 

the Week. 



ort time ago we noticed in this column 
a volume of criticisms by an English critic 
— Mr. A. T. Quiller-Couch; we now wish to 
draw attention to a book by an American 
critii — Professor Brander Mathews, of Columbia College, 
New York. "Ventures in Criticism" consists of seven 
essays, the most interesting of which are those entitled 
"American Literature." On pleasing the taste of the 
public," "Mr. Andrew Lang" and 'Robert Louis Steven- 
son." Of the English language the Professor says: "It 
is a heritage which we derived from our forefathers. We 
hold it by rightof birth. . . . 1 1 i— an American possession, as 
it is a British possession, no more and no less; and we hold 
it on the same terms that our cousins do. We have the 
rights of ownership, and the responsibilities also, exactly 
as they have, and to exactly the same extent." N'ow this 
course, true; but it is not the whole truth. Though 
English is the mother-tongue of Briton and American alike, 
they do not stand in quite the same relations to it. When- 
ever any question as to what is or is not